Henry Fleete and his family

 HENRY FLEETE AND HIS FAMILY

(Adjusted from "Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents" Prepared by W. G. Stanard.)

The distinguished maternal ancestry of Henry Fleete (Sr.) should be first notice in a sketch of him and his family. Sir Henry Wyatt, of Allington Castle, Kent, England, "was a prominent figure at the Court of Henry VIII (1495-1509), and accompanied him to the Field of the Cloth of Gold" (Encyclopedia Britt.). His son, Sir Thomas Wyatt, the Poet, was born 1503, and died October 11, 1542. "Undoubtedly the leader and the acknowledged master of ' the company of courtly makers,' who, in the reign of Henry VIII, under Italian influence, transformed the character of English poetry. He took bachelor's degree at Cambridge at 15; was knighted in 1536, and was twice sent as ambassador to the Emperor (Charles V), a strong proof of his repute as a statesman and diplomatist" (Encyclopedia Britt.). He married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Brooke, Lord Cobham, and had a son, Sir Thomas Wyatt, the Rebel, born 1520, beheaded on Tower Hill, April 11, 1554. "From 1545 to 1550 he commanded at Boulogne, and in 1554 led the Kentish (Protestant) insurgents in the Duke of Suffolk's conspiracy, on occasion of the proposed marriage of Queen Mary with Philip II." (America Encyclopedia) "A cry that the Spaniards were coming 'to conquer the relm' (and restore England to the Pope) drew thousands to Wyatt's standard. The ships in the Thames submitted to be seized by the insurgents. A party of train bands of London, who marched with the royal guard, under the old Duke of Norfolk, deserted to the Rebels in a mass, with shouts of 'A Wyatt, a Wyatt. We are all Englishmen.'" (Green's English People.) "He entered London at the head of his followers, and, after a fight in the streets, he was captured, February 7, imprisoned in the Tower, and beheaded April 11, 1554." (America Encyclopedia.) He married Jane, daughter of Sir William Howt, and had a daughter, Joan Wyatt, who married Charles Scott, son of Sir Reginald Scott, of Scott's Hall, Kent, who "was captain of the castles of Calais and Langette; high sheriff of Kent, 1541-1542; was principally engaged abroad in military service; died December 16, 1554. Remarried Mary, daughter of Sir Bryan Tuke, secretary to Cardinal Wolsey, and had by her Mary, who married Richard Argall, and Charles Scott, who married Jane Wyatt." (Brown's Genesis and Berry's Kentish Pedigrees). Deborah, daughter of Charles and Jane Scott, married William Fleete, gentleman., of Chatham, Kent, England, who was a member of the Virginia Company, under the 3rd charter, and subscribed and paid 37 iosh. They had issue seven sons and four daughters. Four of the sons, Henry Fleete (Sr.), Edward Fleete, Reginold (Reynold) Fleete & John Fleete were among the early emigrants to Virginia and Maryland, member of the Maryland Legislature in 1638; believed to have been the person of the name who patented land at Tindall's Point, Gloucester County, Virginia, in 1662, and was living there in 1667.

Henry Fleete (Sr.) was one of the early explorers. The ships Warwick and Tiger sailed for Thames in 1621 with supplies, young women and wives for planters in Virginia. They fell among Turk ships, the Tiger, was rescued and landed in Jamestown, James County, Virginia. The ship was sent to upper Potomac River to trade for corn. On another voyage the Tiger with Henry Fleete (Sr.) and 21 men was attacked and Henry Fleete (Sr.) was taken captured by the Yawaccomoo-o Indians on the Potomac River in 1623; remained a captive until 1627, during which time he acquired a familiar knowledge of their language; was ransomed, and in 1627 went to England. Becoming a partner and agent for several London merchants, he was engaged for years in the Indian trade. He was an interpreter, trader and legislator in Maryland, and finally settled at Fleet's Bay, Lancaster County, Virginia. As early as 1629 he owned land in Virginia as recorded in the land office records. In 1631 the ship Warwick with Henry Fleete (Sr.) and John Dunton sailed forAmerica and visited New England, James River and Chesapeake Bay. In 1632 he traded in NH and the Isles of Shoals. While there he was arrested by John Utey because his papers were not in order. Governor Harvey and John Utey become interested in Indians with furs to sell. Henry Fleete (Sr.) knew them, so in order to get help from him they let him go free. He helped establish Colvert Colony in Maryland and acted as interpreter and guide. He settled in Maryland and was a prominent associate of Colvert. He was a Maryland Legislature Member in 1638. In 1642 the Virginia assembly gave him the right to explore for fourteen years. In 1644 Lord Baltimore gave him the power to Captain General to visit the Susquehanna Indians and make a peace treaty with them. In 1646 he was appointed to organize an expedition against the Indians and build a fort in the valley of Rappahannock River. In 1652-1653 the Virginia assembly renewed the "Privilege of Discovery" by authorizing Henry Fleete (Sr.) and William Claybourne to discover and trade where no other Englishman had ever been before. In 1656 he served as Lt. Colonel of the Militia and one of the Majesty Justices. He was Burgess for Lancaster in 1652, and engaged in an expedition against the Indians in 1660. His opinions in regard to Indian affairs seem to have had much weight in the colony. He wrote "A Brief Journal of a Voyage made in the Bark Virginia, to Virginia and the other parts of the Continent of American," the MS of which is in the Lambeth Palace Library, London, and which Neill published in his "Founders of Maryland." Streeter, in his "Papers Relating to the Early History of Maryland," says of him: "He was an active man, a useful citizen, a shrewd leader, an excellent interpreter, and contributed his full share towards laying the foundations of the Colony of Maryland, and building up the Colony of Virginia." He was the first to fix the name "Fleet" in the records of the two states. Fleet's Bay, Virginia was given this name because of Henry Fleete (Sr.)

Captain Henry Fleete (Sr.) was a justice of Lancaster County 1653, and on the division of the county (when Rappanhannock County, Virginia was formed) he was appointed by the Assembly, December 13, 1656, a Justice of Lancaster (of the quorum, and 2nd in the commission), and lieutenant- colonel of militia. (Lancaster Records). There is recorded in Northumberland County, Virginia (the date is gone, but is about 1659), a deed from Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Fleete (Sr.), conveying 300 acres of land to Christopher Garlington. Sarah, wife of Col. Henry Fleete (Sr.), joins in the deed. In 1650 he had a grant of 1,750 acres at Fleet's Bay, and received, in all, grants for 13,197 acres. From a record in Lancaster, May 8, 1661, it appears that Sarah Fleete was widow of Lt. Colonel Henry Fleete (Sr.). She married subsequently Col. John Walker, of Rappahannock County (and formerly of Gloucester County), member of the Council, and had by this marriage (as appears from her will, recorded at Essex C. H.), several daughters, one of whom was named Sarah. (It appears that Mr. Hayden was mistaken in his statement in "Virginia Genealogies" that Edwin Conway married Sarah Fleete. Her name was Sarah Walker, and hence the name of Walker Conway). There is recorded in Lancaster, in 1715, and then acknowledged by Henry Fleete (Sr.), a deed from the said Henry Fleete (Sr.), who, at the time of making it, resided in Fairfield parish, Northumberland, conveying in consideration of 1,000, all his title to 2,000 acres of land in Cittenburne parish, which was granted to Col. Henry Fleete (Sr.) in 1657; afterwards, in 1661, granted to Walter Granger, who assigned it to Col. John Walker, and by Walker's will it was left to his (Walker's) daughter, Sarah, and had since been surveyed and divided by said Conway in right of his wife, Sarah. There are also several deeds at Essex C. H., which speak of Sarah, wife of Edwin Conway, as one of the daughters and co-heiresses of Col. John Walker.

See "Henry Fleete and Fleet's Island" historic sign by Virginia Department of Historic Resources, 1995.

Henry Fleet (Jr.) was a justice of Lancaster County 1695 and sheriff 1718 and 1719. There are recorded in Lancaster the following deeds: Henry Fleete (Sr.) of Northumberland County, gentleman, to John Turbervile, of the same county, merchant, for 188 acres at Fleet's Bay, Lancaster County, November 29, 1689. Henry Fleete (Sr.), of Lancaster County, to his son Henry Fleet (Jr.), of same, 500 acres, part of the land called Fleet's Island, February 11, 1718. Henry Fleet (Jr.) to his son William Fleet, 300 acres, part of Fleet's Island, February 11, 1718. Following is his will:

"In the name of God, amen! I, Henry Fleet (Jr.), of the County of Lancaster, being of sound memory, do make this my last will and testament in the manner following, viz: I bequeath my soul to God, my creator, and my body to the earth, its original, being fully assured the sacrifice of Christ is a worthy expiator for all the sins of the faithful, and therefore hope that my soul and body will have a joyful meeting at the resurrection of the just by the merits, mediation, and intercession of my complete Redeemer, the Lord Jesus Christ.

I give to my son, Henry Fleet (III), the plantation that Patrick Mullin now lives on and all the land thereunto belonging, from William Fleet's line down to the mouth of the old house creek. The said land and appurtenances I give unto the said Henry Fleet (III) and the heirs male of his body lawfully begotten and for want of such issue to my son, William Fleet, and the heirs male of his body lawfully begotten, and for want of such male issue to my grandson, Harry Currell and his heirs forever. Item: I give to my son, William Fleet, the plantation I now live on and all the land adjoining thereunto as far as the narrows, including the island plantation and all the land thereunto belonging, which said plantations and the land and appurtenances in the whole tract not before given I give to my son, William Fleet, and the heirs male of his body lawfully begotten, and for want of such issue to my grandson, Maior Brent, and his heirs forever. Item: I give to my son, Henry Fleet (III), my best saddle and all the furniture thereto belonging. Item: I give to my son, William Fleet, all my wearing apparel and also my sword and belt. Item: I give to my loving wife for life the plantation whereon I now live with as much land as she shall have occasion for, also the use and profits of three negroes called Jack, Bess and Sampson, and after her decease I give the said three negroes to my daughter, Elizabeth Currell, and her heirs. Item: I give to my daughter, Elizabeth Currell, and her heirs four negroes by name Saul, Lucy, Bess and boy called Jack Snelgrove, three whereof she has already received. Item: I give to my granddaughter, Ann Currell, and her heirs a negro girl called Winney and all her increase. Item: I give to my daughter, Judith Hobson and her heirs two negroes called Daniel and Pegg, now in her possession. Item: I give to my said daughter, Judith, for life the use of three negroes named Richard, Isaac and Hannah, and after her decease I give Hannah and her increase and Isaac to my granddaughter, Sarah Hobson, and her heirs and I give Richard to my granddaughter, Judith Hobson, and her heirs. Item: I give to my granddaughter, Mary Margaret Cox (called Mary in her father's will), and her heirs two negroes called Newman and Nell, now in her possession. Item: I give to my third daughter, Mary Margaret Cox for life the use of three negroes, viz: a girl called Hannah and Sue and Anthony, and after her decease I give said three negroes and their future increase to Fleet Cox and his heirs. Item: I give to my granddaughter, Elizabeth Howson, and her heirs two negroes that her father received of me called Sary and Patty and their increase. Item: I give to my three grandsons, John Fleet, Maior Brent and Harry Currell, each a mourning suite of twenty shilling price. Item: I give all the rest of my personal estate to be equally divided amongst my wife and three daughters, Elizabeth Currell, Judith Hobson and Mary. Item: It is my will that my estate shall not be appraised, unless desired by executrix. Item: I appoint my son, William Fleet, and my two daughters, Elizabeth Currell and Judith Hobson, my executors.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 31st day of January, 1728.

[SEAL] HENRY FLEET (JR.)

Signed and sealed and published in the presence of

EDWIN CONWAY,
ANN CONWAY,
EDWIN CONWAY, JR."

Henry Fleet (III) was sheriff of Lancaster County 1729 and 1730, and died unmarried in 1735. His will is as follows:

WILL OF HENRY FLEET (III), OF LANCASTER CO., VA, 1735.

In the name of God Amen:

I, Henry Fleet (III) of the parish of Christ Church, in the County of Lancaster, gentleman being sick in body, but of perfect sense and memory do make this my last will and testament in manner as followeth, that is to say first and principally I commend my soul to the Almighty God, an my body to a decent burial. Item, my will is that my just debts be fully paid and satisfied. Item, I give and bequeath twenty pounds currently money to the poor of Christ Church parish aforesaid, to be laid out or distributed as the vestry of the said parish shall think convenient. Item, I lend to my mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Fleet, my negro boy cupid during her natural life, and after her decease I give the said negro to Samuel Hinton. Item, I give and bequeath to the said Samuel Hinton my tract of land which I bought from Charles Kelly, with its appurtenances as also my term yet to come in the lands adjoining the said tract, which I lately leased from the said Charles, to him the said Samuel and his male heirs lawfully begotten forever. Item. I give and bequeath to the aforesaid Samuel Hinton my two negro men Lewis and Phill, also my horse Pompey, my still, my great looking glass and desk, my silver hilted sword and belt, my trunk and all my clothes therein, also my plank and framing stuff and other necessaries I have provided for my building on the plantation where he lives. Item, I give and bequeath to Rebecca Banton my dwelling plantation with its appurtenances to contain two hundred and fifty acres contiguous, during her natural life, and after her decease, I give the said plantation, land and appurtenances unto my nephew, George Fleet and the heirs of his body lawfully begotten forever. Item. I lend the use of my negroes hereafter named, viz. Bristow, Terry, Sally, Libby, Jenny, Kate, Joe and Judy to the said Rebecca Banton during her natural life, and after her decease I give the said negroes and their increase to the aforesaid Samuel Hinton and his heirs male, and do then annex the said slaves to the lands before by me given to him in this my last will and testament. Item. My will is that my negro boy James serve the said Rebecca Banton till he attains the age of twenty-four years, and that she then obtain his freedom as the law requires. Item. I give and bequeath unto my nephew George Fleet, my negroes, Charles, Dick, Ruby, Sarah, Winney, Bess, Nanny, Pegg and Daniel. Item. I give unto my niece Mary Ann Cox my negro girl Letty, which I had out of my father's estate since his death. Item. I give to my nephew John Fleet my best saddle and horses furniture. Item. I give to my godson Richard Edwards, fifteen pound sterling to buy him a young negro. Item. I lend to Daniel Pugh my negro girl Hannah during his term he now has in the plantation, and afterwards I give the said negro girl to my nephew John Fleet. Item. I give unto my tenant Thomas Edwards, the plantation he lives on from the branch to the walnut tree, for twenty-one years next ensuing, he weaving for Rebecca Banton, eighty yards of Virginia Cloth per year. Item. I give unto the said Thomas Edwards one cow and calf and my cloth coat I now wear, also what tobacco he is now indebted to me. Item. I give to William Mugg my spaid mare. Item. I give to Rebecca Banton my mares Conny and Jewel, and my horse Ball, and my will is that she have the use of my still during her life without fee or reward. Item. My desire is to be buried by my father, and that the burying place be handsomely bricked in at the expense of my estate.

Item. I give to my loving friend Thomas Edwards, ten pounds current money to buy him a suit of mourning. Item. I give to Davy Pugh, my Durry Vest and Breeches. Item. I give to William Mugg, my Durry Coat. Item. I give to Samuel Hinton by black cloth suit of clothes. Item. I give to my trustee and executors hereafter named each a mourning ring of twenty shillings price. Item. The half of all the rest and residue of my estate, I give to the aforesaid Samuel Hinton. Item. The other half of my said estate residue, I lend unto the said Rebecca Banton during her natural life, and after her decease, I give the same to Samuel Hinton. Item. I desire my worthy friend, the Honorable John Carter Esq., to be trustee of this my last will and testament.

Lastly. I do appoint my loving friend, Mr. Thomas Edwards and Samuel Hinton Executions of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all other wills by me made. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this 26th day of November, Anna Domini, 1735.

HENRY FLEET [SEAL]

See another Henry Fleete's Will at Finch-Fleet-Scott-Wyatt &c. Connections.

See Henry Fleete at Joe Payne's Stone Message Board Page.

See Henry Fleete's wife at the Will of Sarah Walker

LIBRARY

  • Fleet, Betsy (Author). Henry Fleete: pioneer, explorer, trader, planter, legislator, justice & peacemaker, Whittet & Shepperson Printers, Richmond, Virginia, 1989.
  • Umhau, Jan Fleet (Author). Potomac Captive: The Adventures of Henry Fleete, Dietz Press, Richmond, Virginia 1998. See the picture of cover and the description at Prose & Poetry By Sonia Savage
  • Go to Sources (Biblography) and look for more information and order the book.

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    Table of Contents

    | Ancestral Chart | Census | de la Flotte to Fleete Pedigree Chart | E-mail | Eric Cameron Fleet |
    | Eric's Ancestors On The Web | Family History | Fleet Men On the Web | Fleet People Of The Millennium |
    | Fleet Women On the Web | GEDCOM | Genealogy Pages On The Web | Grayce Drive |
    | Henry Fleete and his family | Home | HTML Codes | Index of Names | Letters | My Family |
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    | Reward | Sign my GuestBook | Sources | Special Thanks | Surname List | Survey |
    | The Ancient History of the Distinguished Surname Fleet No. 1 |
    | The Ancient History of the Distinguished Surname Fleet No. 2 |
    | The Great Fleet Family Tree Descendant Chart | Want To Know More Information |

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