Canadian Forestry Corps
Canadian Forestry Corps in WWII
Information supplied by Robert Briggs with contributions by JFLH

I wish to thank everyone who has made contributions of photos, stories and other info of their
family members of the Canadian Forestry Corps to this website.

If anyone has additional photos or stories they would like us to add here – we would be pleased to do so

We are continuously trying to keep as up-to-date as possible regarding links that are ever changing, that photo’s are properly credited & any sourced material is also properly credited.

For Further information please contact Bob Briggs

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps
District 5, Camp 11
Lovat Estate

Canadian Mobilization Point - Chatham, NB
Mobilization Date - 20 Aug 1949
Arrived in Scotland - 20 Apr 1941
Ceased Operations in Scotland - 1 Apr 1944
Camps Occupied in Scotland Lovat No. 2 (Boblainy), Kiltarlity

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps, CASF
History
24 May 1940 – Authorized – Serial 2116 (GO 184/40)
20 August 1940 – Mobilized in Chatham, New Brunswick (CFC Website)
7 November 1940 - CASF designation dropped (GO 273/40)
16 July 1945– Disbanded (GO 354/45)
War Diaries
16437 – 1940/08-1941/06
16438 – 1941/07-1945/07
Notes
10/40 - On reaching their numbers No. 15 Coy then proceeded by rail to Quebec City for military training. (CFC Website)
31/10/40 – Immigration Building, Quebec, PQ – Nos. 11, 12, 13 and 15 Companies inspected by Brigadier-General J.B. White, Corps Commander. [No. 11 Company WD]
20/2/41 – Company left Quebec on TS-228 (Movement Control)
20/2/41 – Company arrived at Valcartier (Movement Control)
4/4/41 – 0900 hrs Company left Valcartier on TS-251. (Movement Control)
5/4/41 – 1130 hrs Company arrived Halifax and embarked on E-129 Batory. (Movement Control)
10/4/41 – 0830 hrs Company sailed for United Kingdom.
20/4/41 – Arrived in Scotland.
1/4/44 – Ceased operations in Scotland and continued operations in North-West Europe.
Courtesy David Ryan

CFC Cap Badge
Courtesy of Robert J. Briggs

The war created a crisis in wood supply for the United Kingdom. Pre-war domestic production covered only a small fraction of the timber needed to support the war effort. In addition to civilian requirements, it was estimated that every soldier needed five trees: one for living quarters, messing, and recreation; one for crates to ship food, ammunition, tanks, and so on; and three for explosives, gun stocks, coffins, ships, factories, and direct or indirect support for the fighting line.
Canadians stepped up to fill this need. During 1941 and 1942, thirty companies drawn from all regions of Canada, totalling 220 officers and 6,771 regulars, were deployed to Scotland.
Also it takes a number of support soldiers for each fighting soldier.

We did load a ship with lumber, yeah. And it went to Africa and I took a chalk and I wrote my name and address on the board. I get to, it was about a month after, first thing I get this letter from the soldier in Africa. He says, "I want to tell you, he said, that you people, your job is important," he said, "We used your lumber today, we landed in Africa."
Courtesy of Joseph Wilmer Gagnon - The Memory Project Historica Canada

Once again the British Government turned to Overseas Woodsman to assist in the war effort. Given their impressive record in World War One it was natural that they looked to Canada to provide forestry units once again. In May 1940 the Canadian Government decided to form a Canadian Forestry Corps. Twenty Companies were initially formed with ten more as the war progressed.
The financial agreement between the two Governments as similar to that in World War I. Canada would bear the cost of pay, allowances and pensions, all initial personal equipment, transport to and from the United Kingdom. The British Government paid for "all other services connected with equipment, work or maintenance" and certain others, including medical services. Canada covered the cost for Medical Officers and Britain paid for hospitalization.
The arrangement was unusual as it resulted in a Canadian Unit working for the British, who controlled the areas of work and disposal of the product, but Military operations of the C.F.C. was never surrendered by the Canadians and came under command of Canadian Military Headquarters in London. Even though the C.F.C. had to serve two masters, no serious problems ever resulted.

Mobilization centres for the Corp spanned all across Canada, and recruited both English and French speaking personnel. Many of the volunteers were veterans of World War One, including the Corp's Commander, Brigadier- General J.B. White. Many of the men carried out the same duties as they did in civilian life, such as loggers, black smiths, lawyers, store man, cooks and clerks. The big difference between the new Corp and their World War One counter parts were the new Corp were considered Combat Troops.

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps War Diaries - Library And Archives Canada Military Heritage

Aug 1940 Sept 1940 Part 1 & Part 2
Oct 1940 Part 1 & Part 2 Nov 1940 Part 1 & Part 2 & Part 3 & Part 4
Dec 1940 Part 1 & Part 2 Jan 1941 Part 1 & Part 2
Feb 1941 Part 1 & Part 2 Mar 1941 Part 1 & Part 2
Apr 1941 May 1941 June 1941 July1941
Aug 1941 Sept 1941 Oct 1941 Nov 1941
Dec 1941 Jan 1942 Feb 1942 Mar 1942
Apr 1942 May 1942 June 1942 Jan 1943
Feb 1943 Mar 1943 Apr 1943 June 1943
July 1943 Aug 1943 Dec 1943
War Diaries courtesy of Melynda Jarratt

No. 15 Coy
No. 8 Canadian Forestry District
No. 1 Canadian Forestry Group
Jan 1945 Feb 1945 Mar 1945
Apr 1945 May 1945
War Diaries courtesy of Melynda Jarratt

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Enlistment and Training

On reaching their numbers No. 15 Coy then proceeded by rail from Ottawa to Quebec City for military training at nearby Valcartier Camp, Quebec where they and the other Companies would have had 5 to 7 months military training. After completion of training the men travelled by train to Halifax for embarkation, where they joined other units to make the crossing of the North Atlantic in convoy. The crossing itself was about 9 days. They disembarked at a Clyde estuary port, whence they proceeded by train and lorries to their Scottish Camps.
At the end ten of the companies went to the mainland in the Invasion of Normandy, to cut timber there. Ten companies stayed in Scotland to work at their saw mills. Ten companies were disbanded and went back to Canada to form units to cut fuel wood. The No. 15 Coy was one of the Companies that went to the mainland of North West Europe in the Invasion of Normandy. The ten companies that went over to the mainland were No. 1, 5, 9, 14, 15, 16, 25, 27, 28 and 30. However a lot of men were transferred from one company depending on where that soldier was needed. Also about 700 men were transferred to other units.

This larger Map shows that the men came from across our country of Canada and where each of the original 20
companies was mobilized and what percentage from each province the men came from.
Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

CFC soldiers at Valcartier Camp, Quebec

Photo courtesy of Bob Briggs – grandson Private Perle Bruce Tucker

Map of Camp Valcartier, Quebec Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

No.15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Troop Movement

1941 No. 15 Coy CFC Troop Movement Courtesy of David Ryan

St-Gabriel de Valcartier Quebec Depot Train Station
- Train Schedule 251 Serial #2116
- Embarked 4 Apr 1941 – arrived in Halifax 5 Apr 1941

MS Batory 1937 MS Batory - Wikipedia
By Zdjecie niepodpisane (Tygodnik "Swiatowid") [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Boarded ship at Halifax, Nova Scotia
Sailed 10 Apr 1941 arrived in Scotland 20 Apr 1941
Ship number E129 - Convoy TC-10 MS Batory

Map of Port of Halifax
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Firth of Clyde where the men came in to disembark at Gourock and caught a train to Beauly
Train Station then took a lorry to Lovat No. 2 (Boblainy) Camp No. 11
HQ No 5 Dist was at the Balblair House, near Beauly, Inverness-shire, Scotland

Arriving at 2000 hrs and then had supper

Map of Gourock
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Beauly railway station 1775164 Beauly Train Station in 1961 - Wikipedia
Ben Brooksbank [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Camp 11

No 15 Coy CFC Camp 11 Lovat Estate Part1 & Part 2
Courtesy of Sheena McIver (Burris) daughter of Pte Laurie Bernard Burris
When we were in Beauly the mail delivery man took us to the actual mill. The mill shed was still standing along with the housing and stables plus where they held the dance every weekend, dad was stationed there. He used to load his truck up with soldiers and take them all to the dance, got into trouble for doing that. They were told they were going to lose the dance. I guess it didn’t scare them as the next week they were loaded up and off to the dance again.
Yes we definitely were walking in his footsteps as he was with us every step of the way. I will never forget it.

NB Soldiers with Canadian Forestry Corps in Scotland

Canadian Forestry Camps in Scotland WW2 - Camp 11, Boblainy, Lovat 2, Scotland
Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

Map of Camp 11
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside


Photos courtesy of The Sawdust

Fusiliers' by William C Wonders

The camps were located on estate property near a road to permit vehicle access. Buildings were mostly frame, lumber cut in Corp's sawmills. Some Nissen huts were erected and housed shoemakers, armourers carpenters as well as serving other purposes
Men were housed in huts accommodating 14 men each. A cookhouse, ablution hut with hot and cold showers, sergeants' quarters and mess, officers' quarters and mess, orderly room, medical hut, quartermaster stores, garage and workshop were present in the camp.

Nissan Hut at some of the camps
Due to its semicircular, corrugated iron shape the Nissen Hut deflected shrapnel and bomb blast making it a perfect bomb shelter
Courtesy of Melanie McLennan

It is convenient at this point to describe the War Establishment of a Forestry Company, C.F.C. The Establishment (CDN/IV/1940/12A/1, DATED Mar 41) provides for a total of 194 all ranks, of whom six are officers: one Major as Commanding Officer, one Captain as Second in Command, one Adjutant, and three Subalterns "for Timber operations". Of these last, one is normally is in charge in the bush, one is in charge of the mill, and one is technical officer. There are 12 Sergeants, of whom two are Mill Foreman and five Bush Foreman, one a Blacksmith, one a M.T. Sergeant, one a Sergeant Cook, and two Assistant Instructors. It is not necessary or desirable to rehearse all the details here, as the Official Historian will have all War Establishments easily available to him; but it may be noted that the list of rank and file includes the following tradesmen: 2 Millwrights, 2 Sawyers, Forestry; 1 Electrician; 3 Motor Mechanics, one of whom is a Corporal, 1 Carpenter, 1 Plumber or Pipefitter; 1 Shoemaker, and 1 Tailor. Among the mass of non-tradesmen, the following groups are conspicuous: 20 Logmakers, 30 Rollers and Chainmen, 10 Road Cutters, 14 Drivers I.C. (Internal Combustion)
Re No. 29 Report

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Logging Operations

No.15 Coy brought with them the most up-to-date logging equipment then available in Canada. They brought a standard medium type rotary mill with a capacity of 1500-2000 bd. ft. an hour or c. 8,000 cu. ft a week/3-5-4-7 cm an hour or 227 cm a week. (The British Forestry Commission also provided the company with a Scotch mill or bench, but these were not popular with the Canadians.) Power was supplied by 100-horsepowe Diesel generators. Logging equipment included TD9 caterpillar tractors, lorries, sulkies (pneumatic-tired arches), angle dozers for road making, and two and three drum winches for high-lead logging. They also were equipped with a variety of transportation vehicles, four tractors, two sulkies, one motorcycle, and originally six bicycles.

Heavy CFC logging truck
Courtesy of Al Neale - son of Pte Charles Frederick Neale

The heavy-laden Canadian lumber lorries from mills to shipping points placed a great deal of strain on local roads and access roads even when they were gravelled, particularly during rainy periods.
Even before felling could begin most companies had to introduce an access road network in the forests to enable their mechanized equipment to be used, in contrast to the widespread use of horses in prewar local forests. Road building and maintenance continued to occupy part of the CFC personnel even after the initial period.

The military role of the CFC as distinct from its industrial role was important, particularly during the period of possible German Invasion after the fall of France. Personnel were allowed to wear civilian clothing while working, but uniforms were required for military activities and when on leave. As combatant troops they received additional military training on Saturdays after their week's work in the woods. This included practice on rifle ranges and tactical exercises with other military units. Periodically they participated in weekend military schemes in their areas.

Companies usually worked in two sections, "one cutting 'in the bush' and bringing out the timber, the other sawing it into lumber in the company mill, and both using mostly Canadian mechanical equipment," The relative openness of the cultivated Scottish forests in contrast to the tangled undergrowth of most natural Canadian pleased the CFC. Nevertheless, pressure had to be applied to Canadian fallers to cut trees close to the ground in Scottish fashion, rather than higher up, which left unsightly stump-fields so common in home forestry operations. The felling crew consisted of three men, two sawing down and one trimming or limbing. Hand saws and axes were the tools employed. The trees involved reflected the variety of Scottish plantations, with Scot pine, spruce and larch particularly common, but also Douglas fir and hardwoods on occasion. The frequent alternation of rain and snow proved unexpected for many of the Canadians, accustomed to a more continuous snow season. Men's hands were often cut up by handling wet lumber in raw cold weather. Most of the area where they were working in Scotland lay north of 57degrees N, a higher latitude location than most forest operations in Canada-approximately the latitude of Mile 150 on the Alaska Highway (some 100 miles or 160 kilometers north of Fort St. John, B.C.), Fort McMurray, Alberta, Lynn Lake, Manitoba, and the Belcher Islands in Hudson Bay. Consequently, the longer winter darkness period in Scotland was an inconvenience for the felling teams at the extreme ends of the working day and working hours had to be adjusted to seasonal light conditions. (Companies worked a full-hour day, with precise hours decided by individual company commanders. There was no specific equipment provided for loading logs on trucks when they had to be transported to the mill. In most cases where the logging was conducted not too far from the mill, the trees could be taken tree length to the mill by the sulky and bucked (cut into log lengths) at the landing.

Total Production of Forest Products CFC Scotland
Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

Even before felling could begin most companies had to introduce an access road network in the forests to enable their mechanized equipment to be used, in contrast to the widespread use of horses in prewar local forests. Road building and maintenance continued to occupy part of the CFC personnel even after the initial period. In August 1941 for example, No. 15 Company reported that it "had approximately 35 men working on actual logging with 15 men on the average, road building. The remainder of the Company were employed in and around the camp area or down at the mill. Even after roads had been constructed almost constant maintenance was necessary because of the frequent heavy rains and resultant damage.
Wet grounds conditions at several camps forced the provision of drainage ditches and laying down of duckboards. At times even summer rains necessitated the use of four-wheel drive lorries on logging roads. In October 1943 the No. 15 Company at Boblainy Camp was reminded by renewed rain after a fairly dry period "that once more we face a winter of rain, rain, and more rain, with heavy semi-liquid mud slowly and relentlessly moving down the hill sides behind the tractors.
Confusion also existed at times because of the unique requirements of forestry troops. No. 15 Company at Boblainy Camp could not but temper their exasperation with amusement when "British sources supposed to supply us with 100 double-bitted axes could not obtain the double-bitted variety so sent us 200 single-bitted in their stead.

"The Sawdust Fusiliers" by William Wonders
Appendix B p104-106
The Woods Operations of No. 15 Company, CANADIAN FORESTRY CORPS,
From the Month of April, 1941 till October, 1943

The year 1939-1940 found Britian very short of Timber, Owing to this the authorities sent in every available man, no matter from what trade, profession or walk of life, to cut timber. The big factor was that this was more or less an experiment in timber operations and taught those in charge that the fundamental problem in any job is transportation. They discovered that into the larger and more distant woods, roads needed to be built and the futility of building roads, logging, etc., with little or no equipment and unskilled men. The results were that Canadian, Newfoundlanders and others were brought into the country and given the larger forests and more inaccessible woods to cut. They with their smaller crews kept to the forests more or less along the main highways. No. 15 Company on arriving inherited one of the Forestry Commission's, known afterwards as "Ministry of Supply, Home Grown Timber Production Department", initial undertakings with school boy and University Undergraduate labor. This was a patch of timber approximately 10 acres in extent on the other side of the valley from the camp.
Click here to read the rest of the story

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Life in Scotland

The military role of the CFC as distinct from its industrial role, was important, particularly during the period of possible German invasion after the fall of France. Personnel were allowed to wear civilian clothing while working, but uniforms were required for military activities and when on leave. As combatant troops they received additional training on Saturdays after their week's work in the woods. This included practice on rifle ranges and tactical exercises with other military units. Periodically they participated in weekend military schemes in their areas. CFC lorries often were called on to transport personnel of other units as well as its own.
Members of the CFC were seen in uniform regularly at local parades in support of varied wartime causes. In addition to their distinctive cap badges and shoulder patches, from Mar 1943 the CFC were identified by a green triangle below the 'Canada' flash on the upper arm of the battle dress. Church parades also brought them to the public's attention as the No. 15 Coy made use of the local church buildings as well as holding religious services in the camp.

Courtesy of Melanie McLennan

As Allied invasion preparations increased in late winter and spring of 1944 the CFC also prepared for movement across the Channel. At Lamington Park No. 9 Company noted "The Coast that lies only a few miles from us, after having been evacuated in December last year, bristles with training activities, The Firth (Cromarty) with float landing craft of various descriptions; the roar of guns that even shake our camp can be heard by day and night, the surrounding countryside is the site of several airfields and the activities of aircraft are carried out continually."
Beginning in the spring of 1944 further Canadian Forestry Corps companies were withdrawn from Scottish timber operations in preparations for the Invasion of Normandy. The Companies that went to the mainland were not comprised of the same men. The men that were to go over were selected by the officers who were chosen to lead the men. The officers had to keep in mind in the selection that they needed men with certain skills and were they young enough for the job. Going to the mainland was different from working in Scotland. Companies No. 5, 15, 16, 28, and 30 made up No. 1 Canadian Forestry Group, mobilized 1 May 1944, with its headquarters located briefly at Wilderness Camp and then at Beaufort Castle. (A further five companies joined them subsequently, which was Companies No. 1, 9, 14, 25 and 27. The first five companies were sent to Carronbridge Camp just north of Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, for further military training. The men of these first five companies thought they were the cream of the crop until they heard that they on their way to Belgium. They proceeded directly to a staging area at Lancing, Sussex, in southern England. The first companies crossed the Channel from Portsmouth to Normandy beaches in the last days in July and the first in August 1944. From there they moved with the First Canadian Army in the advance across North-West Europe.
Ref: The Sawdust Fusiliers by William Wonders

Extra training Carron Bridge near Thornhill
Courtesy of Linda Bish - daughter of the Pte Edward (Ted) Bish

Companies No. 5, 15, 16, 28, and 30 made up No. 1 Canadian Forestry Group, mobilized 1 May 1944, with its headquarters located briefly at Wilderness Camp and then at Beaufort Castle. A further five companies joined them subsequently, which was Companies No. 1, 9, 14, 25 and 27.) The first five companies were sent to Carronbridge Camp just north of Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, for further military training. The men of these first five companies thought they were the cream of the crop until they heard that the other five companies were on their way to Belgium in October 1944. The first group proceeded directly to a staging area at Lancing, Sussex, in southern England. The first companies crossed the Channel from Portsmouth to Normandy beaches in the last days in July and the first in August 1944. From there they moved with the First Canadian Army in the advance across North-West Europe. Source: 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C Wonders


Beginning in the spring of 1944 further Canadian Forestry Corps companies were withdrawn from Scottish timber operations in preparations for the Invasion of Normandy. Companies No. 5, 15, 16, 28, and 30 made up No. 1 Canadian Forestry Group, mobilized 1 May 1944, with its headquarters located briefly at Wilderness Camp and then at Beaufort Castle. They were sent to Carronbridge Camp just north of Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, for further military training. They proceeded directly to a staging area at Lancing, Sussex, in southern England. The first companies crossed the Channel from Portsmouth to Normandy beaches in the last days in July and the first in August 1944. From there they moved with the First Canadian Army in the advance across North-West Europe.

For further info on No.15 Coy in North West Europe go to - No 8 Canadian Forestry District

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Photos and Stories

Bragdon, Hebert Gough Pte G48058

From: chris fagg
Sent: Wednesday, December 16, 2020 11:34 AM
To: Bob Briggs
Subject: Re: re your grandfather re CFC
Thanks Bob. I have a WW2 portrait. Would you like it for your site?

Harvie, James Burrell L/Cpl F85518
Ref: Reproduction from Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Hennessey, Pat Pte G48191
Contact Us - Canadian Forestry Corps, CFC, Beauly, Scotland ...
Letters of Private Patrick Hennessey
Pat wrote more than 300 letters from Beauly, Inverness-shire, to his family in Canada.
In these excerpts he describes the friendly Scots and his love of the countryside and wildlife.
February 4, 1942: We haven't any snow at all but in England the roads are blocked. It doesn't seem like winter but the nights are cool.
All the people you meet here are awful nice to us Canadians. In the YMCA and dozens of other places they all cheer us and their first words are "Hello Canada!".
March 15, 1942: Just another letter - everyone is well. The robins are beginning to sing more in the mornings like they do at home in May but the robin red-breast
here is no bigger than a sparrow.
He is a cute little fellow and will hop right into the kitchen. We feed him currants.
November 12, 1944: Just a wee note to say we are okay. It has been raining all day. I went to Mass at nine o'clock this morning. We have to cross the river and the
village is an old place Oliver Cromwell passed through on his way north. He knocked down the monastery. Its walls still stand in ruins.

Pte. Patrick J. Hennessy, age 56, in early December, 1940, shortly before he left for basic training at Valcartier Camp in Quebec. Standing with Patrick outside the family home in Bathurst, New Brunswick, Canada is his youngest daughter Anna Hennessy. Across the street is the old Holy Family Catholic Church. Patrick was 61 years old when he returned from Scotland in 1945, making him one of the oldest men to serve for the Canadian Armed Forces during World War Two.

Patrick Hennesy in his Canadian Forestry Corps uniform (middle) with his wife Beatrice (left)
and daughter-in-law, Frances Hennessy, in a photo taken at the Hennessy family home in Bathurst, summer, 1940.

L-R: Alvin Milton Scott, Unknown, Hugh Frederick Carson, Unknown, Unknown, Hinckey
Courtesy of Carrie Robichaud - grand daughter of Hugh Frederick Carson

Carson, Hugh Frederick L/Cpl G48004
Courtesy of Carrie Carson - grand daughter of Hugh Frederick Carson

John Kenneth Fitzpatrick It was taken about 1944-45 by a photographer in Holland or Belgium in exchange for cigarettes
Courtesy of Lenise Fitzpatrick - granddaughter

Pte Zoel LaViolette
From: Denise LaViolette

Photo's Courtesy of Denise LaViolette

Pte's
Zoel LaViolette,
Gordon McNair,
James LaViolette


R - Pte Joseph Thomas O'Toole
Hi Bob, these are photos of Eddie O'Toole, 15 COY, CFC, Beauly, Scotland. He went over to Scotland with 15 COY on April 20, 1941 on the SS Batory with the original group and stayed to the end. He was from Bathurst and is the brother of my aunt Eileen O'Toole who married my uncle Roger Hennessy (my mother's brother). Eddy was with Alleyne Hubbard when Alleyne was killed in Nijmegan. The story unfolds in the 15 COY diaries for November 20, 1944."

Photos courtesy of Melynda Jarratt


Pte Joseph Thomas O'Toole

Pte Joseph Thomas O'Toole

R - Pte Joseph Thomas O'Toole

Pte Joseph Thomas O'Toole

Unknown Soldier

Winter in Scotland

Unknown Soldier

From: pascal
Sent: Wednesday, March 09, 2016 3:57 PM
To: Bob Briggs
Subject: Private Sellick G48066 grouping
Hi Bob.
Another grouping from a Canadian Forestry Corps member. Private Sellick G 48066. I served with the 15th Coy

Sellick, Lester Merrill Cpl G48066
Photo courtesy of Pascal Auger

From: Dawna Scott
Sent: Saturday, November 02, 2019 5:10 PM
To: rj.gonefishing@shaw.ca
Subject: Scott Family
Hi Bob,
I was able to locate a couple of pictures and have attached them for you. The young soldiers in the picture I sent are, on the far left William Scott, Alvin Scott in the middle and Douglas Scott on the right. If I can locate any more pics or information I will send it your way.
Take care Dawna Scott

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - War Brides

Allen, Robert Kenneth Capt married Miss Jean MacApline Tate
Cook, Arnett Edward Pte married Miss Margaret
Hayes, Joseph Lawrence Pte married Miss Flora Anderson
Henry, Robert L. Pte G17344 married Miss Rachel Stewart Miller
LaViolette, Zoel Pte married Miss Mairi Rattray
Perkins, Kempton Keith Pte G48062 married Miss Elizabeth McCart Connell
Scott, Alvin Milton Cpl G48200 married Miss Annie Gradley
Scott, Douglas Haig LCpl G48038 married Miss Jane Simpson Robinson
Scott, William Stickney Cpl G48039 married Miss Emma A. Gradley
Tough, William Taylor Pte H99315 married Miss Sarah

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Company Photos
Why are some soldiers missing from the company photo's


No. 15 Company CFC 11 Nov 1940 - Large Photo
Courtesy of Denise LaViolette daughter of Pte Zoel Joseph Alexander LaViolette G48142


No. 15 Company CFC Aug 1941 Scotland - Courtesy of Denise LaViolette daughter of Pte Zoel Joseph Alexander LaViolette G48142

Larger Photo
National Defense Directorate of History and Heritage
& for further reference Library And Archives Canada Military Heritage
Courtesy of Jean-Francois Chicoine


No. 15 Company August 1943 Scotland - Large Photo
Courtesy of Donald Ferguson son of Lt Col Neil Cameron Ferguson CO of HQ No 1 CFG CFC
Via Michel Boily

No. 15 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Soldiers List
List of Abbreviations - Library and Archives Canada
ABBREVIATIONS and ACRONYMS of WW2 and service records
Military Districts of Canada 1939
Calgary Military Historical Society
No 15 Coy CFC Nominal Roll Call

Access to Information (ATI) Online Request – to obtain the services records for a soldier

Adams, Owen Wilmont Pte F85643 Transf from No.13 Coy transf to CBH R.C.I.C - See CFC Casualties
Akin, John Cedric Leith Lt D105756 Adj - transf from HQ CFC & OCTU transf to No.28 Coy - See No 8 CFD & No 5 Det
Albert, Emile Joseph Cpl G48121
Alkern, Roy LCpl G5044 Transf from 104th Anti Tank Batt RCA transf to No.13 Coy
Allain, Thomas Adophe Sgt G48011 Discharged
Allen, Robert Kenneth Major Offr I/C Military training - 2I/C - transf to No.21 Coy & No.15 Coy & No.5 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Anderson, Pte Transf from CIC
Armstrong, D.L.W. Pte B111627 - See No 8 CFD
Arsenault, George Arthur Pte G48122
Arsenault, John Peter Pte F85563 Transf from No.13 Coy
Baker, E.L. Pte M100625 Transf to No.16 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Barr, Homer A. Pte F51051
Barr, T.R. Pte K41271 Transf from No.29 Coy transf to No 1 CSFS
Barrett, C.S. Pte G7384 - See No 8 CFD
Barrett, J, Pte G5095
Barrett, William Pte G48048
Bateman, William Howard Pte G48123 Transf to No.26 Coy
Beek, Bernard Russell Pte G48069 Transf to No.13 Coy & No.2 Coy
Beek, Edward Henry Pte G45648 cook - transf from No.4 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Bell, Pte - See No 8 CFD
Bell, Joseph Felix Pte C30608 Transf from No.3 Coy & No.24 Coy
Betts, Bert Murzerolle Pte G48070 Transf to No.13 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Bilokury, Pte
Blizzard, Alfred Phair Sgt G48193 foreman 'B' - transf from No 7 DD transf to HQ No 5 Dist
Blizzard, Lemuel Allen Pte G48192 edgerman - transf from No 7 DD
Boehner, William Leroy Pte F85612 Transf from No.13 Coy
Boone, James Duncan ASgt G48152 works foreman
Bosien, Donald Edward CQMS G17025 Discharged - transf from No 7 DD
Bostrom, Alphonse Sgt B17114 blacksmith "B" - transf from No.14 Coy & No.26 Coy & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Boyce, Claude Alexander Pte G48071 Transf to No.8 Coy
Bragdon, Hebert Gough Pte G48058
Branch, Douglas Arnold Sgt G48124 IC tractor driver
Branch, Samuel Harding Cpl G48125 foreman
Breau, Edmond Pte G48108
Breau, Emilie Joseph Pte G48097
Breau, Joseph Leon Pte G48126
Breau, Wilbert Pte G48098 Transf to No.10 Coy
Brehaut, Lawrence Marshall Pte G48099
Brenton, Walter Campbell Pte F85574 Transf from No.13 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Brewer, Fraser Wylie Pte G48003 Transf to No 6 DD
Brewer, Tennyson Lockhart Pte G48059 Transf to No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Brien, R.P. Pte G48236 Transf from No.10 Coy
Brown, Gerald Roland Pte G48049 motor mech
Bryson, Harry Elliott LCpl F85608 Transf from No.13 Coy transf to No.26 Coy
Burns, Arthur Stephen Pte G48050 Transf to No.29 Coy
Burris, Laurie Bernard Pte F77403 Transf from & back to No.13 Coy
Butler, Pte Transf from CIC
Byers, Karl Rodman AStaff Sgt G48051 Transf to RCAMC
Caldwell, A.S. Pte G48196 carpenter - transf from No 5 DD
Cameron, Hoyes Alexander Lt F6129 Transf from Anti Tank Batt transf to No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Cameron, John James Pte G48109 millwright - transf to No.29 Coy
Campbell, Allen John Pte G48102 Transf to No.29 Coy
Campbell, Duncan Robert Pte G48127
Carlisle, Harry Everett ASgt G48168 foreman - transf to No.9 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Carr, Murray William Pte G48072 driver IC tractor
Carson, Hugh Frederick L/Cpl G48004
Cassidy, James Edmund Pte F85594 Transf from No.13 Coy transf to No.26 Coy
Cates, Seymour Fraser Pte F25381 Transf from No.13 Coy
Chambers, George Harold LCpl G48175 Transf to No.13 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Chambers, Leo John Pte G48005 Transf to No.13 Coy
Christie, Joseph Henry Pte G48128 Transf to HQ No 1 CFG
Clark, William Joseph Pte G48073 Transf to No.29 Coy
Clewley, Harold Albert Pte G48006
Clouthier, Oliver Capt C63153 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 8 CFD transf to Forestry Directory Works – Rear HQ No 21 Army Group
Clow, Benjamin Leonard Sgt G4206 cook
Clowater, Eldon Samuel Pte G48074 Transf to No 1 CFG - See No 8 CFD
Clowes, Coleman Kitchen Pte G48153 Discharged
Cogswell, Frederick William SSgt G17024 clerk 'C' - transf from No 7 DD transf to HQ No 2 Dist
Collins, James Cameron Lt K41139 Transf from No.30 Coy & OCTU & No.6 Coy & No.20 Coy & No.10 Coy & No 1 CSFS - See No 8 CFD
Colwell, Coburn Irvine Pte G48169 cook
Condly, George Alexander Pte G48007 tailor
Cook, Arnett Edward Pte G758
Craig, Charles Ernest "Ernie" Armr Staff Sgt C2439 RCOC att to No.15 Coy transf to QOCH
Crawford, Wendell S. Pte G19741 Transf from H&PER - See No 8 CFD
Creighton, Lawrence William Sgt G48110 cook - See No 8 CFD transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Croal, Kenneth Alexander Sgt K54045 Orderly Room Sgt - transf from No.29 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Crockett, Joseph Hutchinson Pte G48284 Transf from HQ CFC
Croston, Sgt
Curley, Arthur Solomon Pte G48054 Transf to No 7 DD
Currie, Harry Riccard Capt G18738 Adj - transf from No 7 DD transf to HQ No 5 Dist & HQ CFC
Dampier, W. Pte H94610 Transf from No.29 Coy & No.10 Coy
Daniel, James Edward Pte F85654 Transf from No.13 Coy
Davidson, Charles Wetmore Pte G48154
Davidson, R.L. Pte K41273 Transf from No.29 Coy transf to No 1 CSFS
Daye, Frederick George Pte G48008 Transf to No.13 Coy & No.29 Coy
Deneau, Raymond Pte K41336 Transf from No.29 Coy & No.18 Coy transf to No.27 Coy - See CFC Casualties
Dempsey, Frederick William Pte G48129 Transf to No.13 Coy
Dempsey, Joseph Alexander Pte G48009 Transf to No.29 Coy
DeRoche, Frank Pte G45754 Transf from No.4 Coy transf to No.4 Coy & No.10 Coy
Doak, Hedley John Sgt. G48104 foreman - See No 8 CFD
Doak, John Hedley Sgt G48103 foreman
Doggett, Ervin B. Cpl F79972
Donnelly, Allen Elroy Pte G48010 log canter - transf to No.21 Coy
Doucet, Donald Joseph Pte G48130 Transf to No.13 Coy
Downey, Kenneth Raymond Pte G48155
Doyle, T.E. Pte G50073 - See No 8 CFD transf to No.1 Coy & No.28 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Drost, Perry Pte G45610 Transf from No.4 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Duguay, Clifford Joseph L/Cpl G48176
Duguay, Raphel Pte G48087 Transf to No.13 Coy & No.20 Coy
Dunham, John Richard Pte F85509 Transf from No.13 Coy
Duplisea, Fred Perry Pte G27148 Transf to No.29 Coy
Dyment, Lawrence Bayfield Pte F85576 Transf from No.13 Coy transf to HQ No 1 CFG
Earle, Percy Burton Pte G7320 Transf from No 7 DD transf to No.13 Coy
Ellison, Robin Granville Pte G48088
English, William Emanuel Pte G48096 Transf to No.13 Coy
Estey, George Clement Pte G48111 Transf to No.13 Coy
Evans, T. Pte K41238
Everett, George Gordon LCpl G48156
Everett, Lloyd Elmer Pte G48283 Transf from HQ CFC
Fawcett, Donald Goucher Pte G48157 Transf to No 6 DD
Fitzgerald, Donald Andrew Pte G48131
Fitzgerald, Gerard Cpl G48550 Transf to No.13 Coy
Fitzpatrick, John Kenneth Pte G48112 steward at Officers Mess & barber - transf to HQ No 2 Dist & HQ No 8 CFD
Flanagan, John Leo Pte G48132 Transf to No 6 DD
Fletcher, Jesse Edward Pte G45660 Transf from No.4 Coy transf to No.12 Coy & No 1 CSFS
Fletcher, Raymond John Sgt G48073 Transf to No.8 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Foster, Melbourne George Alfred Pte G48012 Transf to No.13 Coy
Fraser, Howard Gordon Pte G48013 works foreman
Fulton, Clarence Joseph Sgt G18139 Transf to No 2 CIRU
Furlong, A. Staff Sgt E25804 19th Field Ambulance RCAMC att to No.15 Coy
Gamblin, Samuel Tilley Pte G48158 Transf to HQ No 5 Dist & No.15 Coy & No.8 Coy
Gates, S.F. Sgt F25381 motor mech 'B' - transf from & back to No.13 Coy
Gee, Herbert Perley Sgt G48159 sawfiler 'C' - transf to HQ No 5 Dist
Gibbons, Garnet Earl Pte G48170 cook
Gill, Harry Pte F85598 Transf from No.13 Coy
Godfrey, George Ronald Pte G48120 IC tractor driver
Goneau, Havelock Earl James Pte G48133
Gorman, Howard Thornton Pte D108073 Transf from HQ CFC transf to No.13 Coy
Gorman, Stanley William Pte G48089
Gorveatt, Arthur Leslie Pte G48167
Goudreau, Joseph Wilbert Pte G48134 engine artificer
Graham, George Napier Cpl G48068
Graham, John Edward Pte G48014 Transf to Gen Workshop & HQ No 1 CFG
Grant, Coleman Otty Pte G48015
Grant, William Edward Pte G48135
Gray, Robert Pte G48100
Green, Edward Gerard Pte G48016 cook
Greene, Frank Sydney Pte G48077 shoemaker
Green, Karl Alexander Pte G48076 Discharged
Green, Robert Duncan Pte G48060
Gregan, Robert Eldon Pte G48183 Transf to No.29 Coy
Gunning, Philip Charles Pte G48299 - See No 8 CFD transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Hadley, Leander Joseph Pte G48136 Transf to No 6 DD & No.16 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Hall, E.M. Pte - See No 8 CFD
Hamilton, F.W. Pte L110123
Hanson, Albert Edgar Major Transf to No.29 Coy
Harding, Charles Frederick CQMS G48052 Transf to OCTU & No.7 Coy & No.6 Coy
Harvie, George Levi Pte G48137 Transf to No.13 Coy
Harvie, James Burrell L/Cpl F85518 Transf from No.13 Coy - See CFC Casualties
Hayes, Joseph Lawrence Pte G48055 Transf to No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Hennessey, Patrick Joseph (Pat) Pte G48191
Henry, Hayward William ‘Bunny’ Pte G48160
Henry, R.L. Pte G17344
Hetherington, Frank Llewellyn Pte G45671 Transf from No.4 Coy transf to No.16 Coy - See No 8 CFD & RCASC
Hewitson, Eric Kitchener Pte G48018
Hewitson, William Errington Pte G48017
Higgins, Raymond Edward Pte G48171
Hinchey, Roland George Pte G48019 Transf to No.13 Coy & No.21 Coy & No.29 Coy
Hirtle, Vincent Henry Pte F85522 Transf from No.13 Coy
Hooper, William John Pte M61865 Transf from No.19 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Hough, John Sgt G48172 Transf to No.13 Coy transf back to No.15 Coy
Houlahan, Michael Joseph Pte G7399 Transf from No 5 DD transf to No.13 Coy
Hubbard, Alleyne Russell Lt 33028 woods offr - transf from No 1 CGRU & Reinf Sec - See No 8 CFD & CFC Casualties
Hughson, Shalta William Pte G48020
Jewers, Earl Huntley Pte F85571 Transf to No.13 Coy
Johnston, Dougal MacKenzie Cpl G48021 - See No 8 CFD
Joncas, Joseph Manuel Pte G48138 Transf to No.13 Coy
Kennedy, Graydon Pte G48061 Discharged
Kennedy, Herman Frederick Pte G48161
Kenny, Raymond Pte G48053 Transf to No.13 Coy
Kent, Sidney Stephen Pte G48139 Transf to No 6 DD
King, Benidict Francis Sgt G48177 woods foreman
King, Joseph Sylvester Pte G48078 foreman
Kinney, Elijah Mills Pte G48256 Transf to No.10 Coy & No.4 Coy
Korola, S.R. Pte B130045
Ladds, Charles William Pte G48022 Discharged
Landry, Albert George Pte G48087
Landry, Emile Joseph Pte G48140 Discharged
Landry, John Pte G48113 Transf to No.29 Coy
Langlo, Pte - See No 8 CFD
LaViolette, Zoel Joseph Alexander Pte G48142
Lawton, William Russell Sgt G48151 Transf to OCTU & No.16 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Layton, Harry Reginald CSM K98557 Transf from No.6 Coy & HQ No 2 Dist & No.22 Coy & No.19 Coy- See No 8 CFD
Lebell, Armand J. Pte G32393 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Leblanc, Charles Gregory Pte F85580 Transf from No.13 Coy
Lejeune, Joseph Francis Pte G48141 Transf to No.21 Coy
Leslie, C. Pte K41407 Transf to No.29 Coy
Leslie, Walter Davidson Sgt G48023 bush foreman
Levesque, George Pte G45742 Transf from & back to No.4 Coy
Lewis, Glen Pte G48168 edgerman
Lindsay, Gerald Parker Pte G48024 Discharged
Little, Harvey Frederick Lt C63071 Adj - transf from No.1 Coy & HQ CFC & HQ No 5 Dist & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Lovely, Elvin Cecil Pte G45561 Transf from No.4 Coy transf to No.4 Coy & No.10 Coy
Lowney, Francis Gerald Sgt G43143 RCAMC att to No.15 Coy - See CFC Casualties
Lowrie, J.R. Pte G4342 millwright - transf from No 5 DD
Ludford, Harold Ernest Sgt G48025 mill foreman
Lund, J.F. Pte - See No 8 CFD
Lynds, Eben Wilfred Pte F85558 Transf to No.8 Coy
MacDonald, Eugene Harold Pte G48090
MacDonald, L.F. Cpl F44618 Transf from No.26 Coy
MacDonald, Lorne Locklane Pte G48026 Transf to HQ No 5 Dist
MacDonald, Merrill Frances Pte G48091 motor mech
MacDonald, R.A. Pte C34602 Transf from No.21 Coy
MacKey, Emmett L. Lt
MacNaughton, Gordon Earl Pte G48033
MacPhail, Duncan Archibald Major - See No 8 CFD
MacQueen, Ronald Homer Pte M49752 Transf from No 13 DD & No.19 Coy transf to No.23 Coy
Mahoney, James John Pte G48114 Transf to No.13 Coy & No.21 Coy & No.26 Coy
Martin, D.A. Pte D113081 Transf from No.9 Coy & HQ No 1 CFG - See No 8 CFD
Martin, William Charles Pte G48027 Transf to No.26 Coy
Matheson, Alden Pte G48178
Matheson, William MacDonald Pte F85602
Mauzeorell, Alexander Cpl G48179 cook 'C' - transf to HQ No 2 Dist & RCASC att to HQ No 2 Dist & No.4 Coy & No.10 Coy
McAdam, Frank William Sgt G48028 mill foreman 'A' - transf to HQ No 5 Dist & No.21 Coy
McCallum, William Ross Pte G48101 Transf to No.26 Coy
McCarty, Duncan Irvine Pte G48163
McCready, George Milton Staff Sgt G48029 - See No 8 CFD
McCulloch, Levi Earl Pte F65593 Transf from Reinf Sect & No.18 Coy- See No 8 CFD
McDonald, Harry Joseph Sgt G48030 transp - See No 8 CFD
McIntyre, George Pte G48081 Transf to No.13 Coy
McKay, Herbert Burton Pte G488031 Transf to No.13 Coy
McKeen, William Allen Cpl G48001
McKeil, Cecil Bertram Pte G48032
McKeil, William Glen Pte G48079
McKenna, Peter Pte F96492 Transf from Reinf Sect transf to No.29 Coy
McLean, Harry Ernest Pte F85618 Transf from No.13 Coy
McLean, Lawrence Spencer Pte F85619 Transf from No.13 Coy
McMahon, J.A. Pte H99509 Transf from No.29 Coy
McMahon, James Francis Pte G48115
McNair, Gordon David Pte G48143 Transf to No.13 Coy & HQ No 1 CFG
Melanson, Thomas Tony Sgt C19035 Transf from C&YR & No 7 DD transf to HQ No 1 Dist & Reinf Sect & No.21 Coy & No.3 Coy & No 7 CIRU
Mersereau, Bryon MacLeod Sgt G48060 bush foreman - transf from No 7 VGC transf to No.23 Coy
Michaud, Ephraem Pte G45741 Transf from No.4 Coy
Miner, M.E. Pte G49446 - See No 8 CFD
Mitchell, George Freeman Pte G48080
Mobbs, Cecil William Pte G45728 Transf from No.4 Coy transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Moran, Frank Leo Pte G45744 Transf from No.4 Coy transf to No.4 Coy & RCASC att to No.4 Coy
Morrison, James Michael Pte G48184 Transf to No.26 Coy
Mott, Arnold Edwin CSM G17662 Transf from No 7 DD
Muck, Bert Roy Pte G48067
Murphy, Gerald Cecil Lt TK96611 Transf from No.6 Coy & CGRU transf to CFC HQ No 1 Dist - See No 8 CFD
Murray, John Lyall Pte GG48034 Transf to No.13 Coy
Murray, Robert Reid Lt Adj - transf from No 1 CERU transf to HQ No 2 Dist & HQ No 3 Dist & No.25 Coy & No.24 Coy & No.6 Coy & No.16 Coy & No.5 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Nason, David Earl Pte G45659 Discharged - transf from No.4 Coy
Neal, Arthur Walter Pte G48164
Nelson, Henry Joseph LCpl G48035 Transf to No.29 Coy
Norquay, William Banks Pte G48056
Ogilive, Ernest William Sgt G48036 cook - Discharged
Orser, S.A. Pte G46836 Transf from Reinf Sect transf to HQ No 5 Dist & HQ No 1 Dist
Oslund, Stone E. Sgt H62692 Transf to HQ No 5 Dist & back to No.15 Coy
O'Toole, Joseph Thomas Pte G48144
Owens, Ernest Patrick Pte G48037
Pallen, James Pte G48092 Transf to No.13 Coy
Palmer, Frederick John Pte G45721 Transf from No.4 Coy transf to No.25 Coy
Parker, Raymond Arnold Sgt G48173 foreman - See No 8 CFD
Parker, Royce Lemuel Pte G48194 Discharged - transf from No 7 DD
Parks, Harold Lawrence Pte G982 Transf from Reinf Sect- See No 7 CFD
Paton, Pte Transf from CIC
Patriquin, H.W. Pte F95478 Transf from Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD
Patriquin, Lionel Hiram Pte F85532 Transf from No.13 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Patterson, C.A. Pte - See No 8 CFD
Patterson, G.F. Pte - See No 8 CFD
Patterson, W.R. Pte M60473 - See No 8 CFD transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD transf to No 13 CBR
Perkins, Kempton Keeth Pte G48062 - See No 8 CFD
Perkins, Philip Pte G48063 Transf to No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD transf to HQ No 7 CFD
Phipps, Ivor V. Pte M46310 RCASC att to No.15 Coy transf from No.10 Coy & HQ No 5 Dist - See No 8 CFD
Reid, Edward Alexander Pte G48056
Rennie, A.M. Pte K72631 Transf from No.18 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Richardson, Edmund George Pte G48145 - See No 8 CFD
Richardson, Frank William Pte G48082 engine artificer
Riordon, Lawrence Wilfred Pte G48231 sawyer 'A' - transf from HQ CFC transf to OCTU & No.3 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Robinson, Melvin James Pte G48083 - See No 8 CFD
Ross, Hanford Michael Pte G48093
Rossignol, Noah Pte G45740 Transf from No.4 Coy
Roussell, Onile Pte G45753 Transf from & back to No.4 Coy
Roy, Albert E. Pte G45752 Transf from & back to No.4 Coy
Russel, Romeo Joseph Pte G48146
Sampson, Arthur Joseph Pte F85535 Transf from No.13 Coy
Sargent, Harold Bryon Pte G48147 Transf to No.27 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Saunders, Bud Pte G48238 Transf from No 7 DD & No 5 DD transf to No.13 Coy & HQ CFC
Saunders, Frederick Willard Cpl G48002 Transf to HQ No 5 Dist
Saunders, R.H. Pte K41434 Transf from No.29 Coy transf to No 1 CSFS
Savage, Percy Benedict L/Cpl G48116 Transf to North Shore (N.B.) Regt
Savoie, Paul Emile Pte E5326 Transf from RCE transf to No.13 Coy
Savoie, Walter Pte D125431
Savoie, William Henry Sgt G48187 foreman - transf from No 7 DD transf to HQ CFC
Savoy, Colin David Pte G48094
Savoy, John William LCpl G48185 Transf to No.7 Coy
Scott, Alvin Milton Pte G48200 Transf from No 5 DD transf to RCE
Scott, Douglas Haig Pte G48038 - See No 8 CFD
Scott, William James Pte G48015 driver IC tractor
Scott, William Stickney Cpl G48039 foreman
Sealey, Robert Hugh Pte G48148 Transf to No.21 Coy
Sellick, Lester Merrill Cpl G48066 - See No 8 CFD
Seymour, Gerald William Pte G48040 Transf to No.11 Coy
Shaw, Samuel Erlin Pte G48064 Transf to No.29 Coy
Shewan, Laurence Pte C89523 electr - transf from No.11 Coy transf to No.29 Coy
Simpson, Alexander Pte G48168 Transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Sippley, Nazaire Pte G48084
Smeeth, Edward Holton Capt K24013 Adj & 2I/C- transf from 17th SBRCA & No.6 Coy & HQ No 5 Dist & No.18 Coy & OCTU transf to No.19 Coy & No 1 CSFS & back to No.15 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Sobiski, Bernard ‘Bud’ Pte H94663 Transf from No.29 Coy
Soucie, Charles Pte G45756 Transf from No.4 Coy
Spavold, William Stanley Pte F85567 Transf from No.13 Coy
Stairs, Ivan Eric Cpl G48041 Transf to RCAF - See No 8 CFD
Stewart, Leonard Douglas Pte G48293 Transf from HQ CFC transf to No.13 Coy
Stewart, Manford Perley Pte G48106 Transfe to No 7 DD
Swazey, Herbert Ruben Pte G48174 saw filer 'C' - transf to HQ No 1 Dist
Taylor, Aaron Raymond Pte G48298 Transf from HQ CFC
Taylor, Derwith Roderick Pte G48297 Transf from HQ CFC transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Taylor, Durham Peter Pte G48300 Transf from HQ CFC
Taylor, Millage Allen Pte G48166 Transf to No.29 Coy
Theriault, Romeo Pte G45755 Transf from No.4 Coy transf to No.4 Coy & No.10 Coy
Thompson, Sydney Melvin Pte G48043 Transf to No.26 Coy
Thomson, John Ellis Cpl G48107 Transf to No.13 Coy
Tims, John Robert Pte G48042 Discharged
Totten, Arthur Bruce Pte G3407 Transf from HQ CFC transf to No.13 Coy
Tough, William Taylor Pte H99315
Trevors, Hazen Melvin Sgt G48117 Transf to No.4 Coy & HQ No 8 CFD
Trevors, Stafford Benson ALCpl G48118 Transf to No.29 Coy
Ullock, Melvin Richard Pte G48180
Underhill, Stanley Ian CQMS G48182 Transf to No.29 Coy
Urquhart, Charles Murel Pte G48044 Discharged
Wallace, George Gregory Pte G48085
Walsh, George S. Pte G48095 millwright
Walsh, James Pte G48181 sawyer
Watson, E.J. Pte
Weatherbee, Donald Ross Pte F85545 Transf from & back to No.13 Coy
Westman, John Thomas Capt mill officer - transf from CFC Training Camp Valcartier & No.21 Coy transf to No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Weston, Arthur J. Pte G48199 engine artificer - transf from No 5 DD - See No 8 CFD
Whelton, Bedford Edward Pte G48149
White, J.R. Pte G53007
Wiggins, Maurling Lewis Pte G48045 - See No 8 CFD
Williams, Charles Archie Lt Col E.D. O.B.E. CO - transf to HQ No 3 Dist & HQ No 2 Dist & HQ No 8 CFD
Williams, Fred Henry 'Dick' Pte G23854 Transf from No 7 DD & Reinf Sect & No.29 Coy transf to No.16 Coy - See No 8 CFD & CFC Casualties
Williams, John Eldon Pte
Williams, Raymond John Pte G28690 Transf from Reinf Sect
Williston, Allen Seymour Pte G48119
Wilson, H. Pte K41542 Transf to No.28 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Woods, David Pte G48086 Transf to No.13 Coy
Worthylake, Cecil Edwin Pte F85592 Transf from & back to No.13 Coy
Wourinen, Pte - See No 8 CFD
Wyman, Jasper Alonzo Pte G48065
Yerxa, Donald Clifford Sgt G48046
Young, Claire Machar Capt Discharged
Young, Fred Alexander Pte F76947
Yourth, J.E. Pte

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