Canadian Forestry Corps
Canadian Forestry Corps in WWII
Information supplied by Robert Briggs with contributions by JFLH

I wish to thank everyone who has made contributions of photos, stories and other info of their
family members of the Canadian Forestry Corps to this website.

If anyone has additional photos or stories they would like us to add here – we would be pleased to do so

We are continuously trying to keep as up-to-date as possible regarding links that are ever changing, that photo’s are properly credited & any sourced material is also properly credited.

For Further information please contact Bob Briggs

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps
District 1, Camp 3
Skibo A, Spinningdale

Canadian Mobilization Point – Valcartier Camp
Mobilization Date –May 1942
Arrived in Scotland – 11 Jun 1942
Ceased Operations in Scotland – 1 Apr 1944
Camps Occupied in Scotland - Skibo A, Spinningdale

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps
History
23 January 1942 – Authorized – Serial 2137 (GO 84/42)
May 1942 – Mobilized at Camp Valcartier, PQ (CFC Website)
14 July 1945– Disbanded (GO 354/45)
War Diaries - Library And Archives Canada Military Heritage
16449 – 1942/05-1944/12
16450 – 1945/01-1945/07
Notes
31/5/42 – The company left Valcartier Camp enroute to Halifax with five officers and 188 ORs. CO was Major P.W. Belson. [WD]
1/6/42 – Arrived at Halifax at 0830 hours and embarked on MS Batory (E-490).
3/6/42 – Sailed from Halifax. Shared ship with detachments from 6th and 8th Field Company RCE. [WD]
10/6/42 – Dropped anchor in the Clyde. [WD]
11/6/42 – Loaded onto tender at 1330 hours and landed at Gourock. Entrained. [WD]
12/6/42- Arrived at Ardgay and arrived at camp near Spinningdale. [WD]
1/4/44 - Ceased operations in Scotland and continued operations in North-West Europe.
Courtesy David Ryan

CFC Cap Badge
Courtesy of Robert J. Briggs

The war created a crisis in wood supply for the United Kingdom. Pre-war domestic production covered only a small fraction of the timber needed to support the war effort. In addition to civilian requirements, it was estimated that every soldier needed five trees: one for living quarters, messing, and recreation; one for crates to ship food, ammunition, tanks, and so on; and three for explosives, gun stocks, coffins, ships, factories, and direct or indirect support for the fighting line.
Canadians stepped up to fill this need. During 1941 and 1942, thirty companies drawn from all regions of Canada, totalling 220 officers and 6,771 regulars, were deployed to Scotland.
Also it takes a number of support soldiers for each fighting soldier.

We did load a ship with lumber, yeah. And it went to Africa and I took a chalk and I wrote my name and address on the board. I get to, it was about a month after, first thing I get this letter from the soldier in Africa. He says, "I want to tell you, he said, that you people, your job is important," he said, "We used your lumber today, we landed in Africa.
Courtesy of Joseph Wilmer Gagnon - The Memory Project Historica Canada

Once again the British Government turned to Overseas Woodsman to assist in the war effort. Given their impressive record in World War One it was natural that they looked to Canada to provide forestry units once again. In May 1940 the Canadian Government decided to form a Canadian Forestry Corps. Twenty Companies were initially formed with ten more as the war progressed.
The financial agreement between the two Governments as similar to that in World War I. Canada would bear the cost of pay, allowances and pensions, all initial personal equipment, transport to and from the United Kingdom. The British Government paid for "all other services connected with equipment, work or maintenance" and certain others, including medical services. Canada covered the cost for Medical Officers and Britain paid for hospitalization.
The arrangement was unusual as it resulted in a Canadian Unit working for the British, who controlled the areas of work and disposal of the product, but Military operations of the C.F.C. was never surrendered by the Canadians and came under command of Canadian Military Headquarters in London. Even though the C.F.C. had to serve two masters, no serious problems ever resulted.
Mobilization centres for the Corp spanned all across Canada, and recruited both English and French speaking personnel. Many of the volunteers were veterans of World War One, including the Corp's Commander, Brigadier- General J.B. White. Many of the men carried out the same duties as they did in civilian life, such as loggers, black smiths, lawyers, store man, cooks and clerks. The big difference between the new Corp and their World War One counter parts were the new Corp were considered Combat Troops.

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps War Diaries Library And Archives Canada Military Heritage

June 1942 July 1942 Aug 1942 Sept 1942 Oct 1942 Nov 1942
War Diaries Courtesy of Robert J. Briggs

Dec 1942 Jan 1943 Feb 1943 Mar 1943 Apr 1943 May 1943
June 1943 July 1943 Aug 1943 Sept 1943 Oct 1943 Nov 1943
Dec 1943 Jan 1944 Feb 1944 Mar 1944
War Diaries Courtesy of Jean-Francois Chicoine

No. 30 Coy No 8 Canadian Forestry District
No 1 Canadian Forestry Group
Canadian Forestry Corps

Apr 1944 Part 1 & Part 2 May 1944 Part 1 & Part 2 June 1944 Part 1 & Part 2 & Part 3
July 1944 Part 1 & Part 2 Aug 1944 Part 1 & Part 2 Sept 1944 Oct 1944
Nov 1944 Part 1 & Part 2 Dec 1944 Part 1 & Part 2 Jan 1945 Feb 1945
Mar 1945 Part 1 & Part 2 Apr 1945 May 1945 June 1945
July 1945 Part 1 & Part 2 & Part 3 War Diaries Courtesy of Jean-Francois Chicoine

This larger Map shows that the men came from across our country of Canada and where each of the original 20
companies was mobilized and what percentage from each province the men came from.
Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

After the initial 20 companies were raised an additional 10 companies were formed.
These ten companies except for No. 25 Coy was formed up in Valcartier Camp, Quebec
Library And Archives Canada Military Heritage - No. 30 Coy War Diairies

The soldiers of No. 21 Coy – to No. 30 Coy were enlisted in various areas of Canada and then transferred to CFC Wing, Valcartier, A(I)TC – Army Infantry Training Centre
for combat training prior to going overseas. Valcartier CFC Combat Training

Comte d'Athlone et William Lyon Mackenzie King passant les soldats en revue The Governor General and his prime minister inspecting troops in 1940 at Valcartier Camp
CFB Valcartier - Wikipedia
See page for author [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

CFC soldiers at Valcartier Camp, Quebec
Photo courtesy of Bob Briggs – grandson Private Perle Bruce Tucker

Map of Camp Valcartier, Quebec
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Troop Movement

No 30 Coy CFC Ships Roll 1 Jun 1942 Courtesy of David Ryan

St-Gabriel de Valcartier Quebec Depot Train Station
-Train Schedule 624 Serial #2137
-Embarked 31 May 1942 – arrived in Halifax 1 June 1942

MS Batory 1937 MS Batory - Wikipedia
By Zdjecie niepodpisane (Tygodnik "Swiatowid") [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Boarded ship at Halifax, Nova Scotia
Sailed 3 June 1942
Ship number E490 - Convoy NA-10 MS Batory

Library And Archives Canada Military Heritage
Credit: Canada. Dept. of National Defence / Library and Archives Canada / PA-112993

Convoy in Bedford Basin, Halifax
1 Apr 1942

Interactive Map of Port of Halifax & PDF Map
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Canadian soldiers aboard a troopship arriving at Greenock, Scotland, 31 August 1942.
Reproduction of Faces of the Second World War - Image 300
Photographer: Laurie A. Audrain

Courage at Sea

Interactive Map of Gourock - Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Enlarged Maps of Gourock Scotland - Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Ardgay Station after a Snowfall - geograph.org.uk - 723950 Ardgay Railway Station - Wikipedia
Peter Gamble [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Arrived 12 June 1942 at Ardgay

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Camp 3

Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders


Skibo Castle where Skibo A, Spinningdale was located

CastleUK.net

A map and list of the 33 CFC camps in Scotland Note Camp 14, Highwood (Feabuie), Culloden
Canadian Forestry Camps in Scotland
Courtesy of The Sawdust Fusiliers by William C Wonders

CFC Map Scotland
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Camp 3 was the home of No. 30 Coy CFC from 11 Jun 1942 until 1 Apr 1944

Interactive Map of Camp 30
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Larger Version
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

The camps were located on estate property near a road to permit vehicle access. Buildings were mostly frame, lumber cut in Corp's sawmills. Some Nissan huts were erected and housed shoemakers, armourers carpenters as well as serving other purposes
Men were housed in huts accommodating 14 men each. A cookhouse, ablution hut with hot and cold showers, sergeants' quarters and mess, officers' quarters and mess, orderly room, medical hut, quartermaster stores, garage and workshop were present in the camp.

Nissan Hut at some of the camps
Due to its semicircular, corrugated iron shape the Nissen Hut deflected shrapnel and bomb blast making it a perfect bomb shelter
Photos courtesy of Melanie McLennan

No. 30 Coy consisted of 190 - 230 all ranks, under the command of a major. British authorities already had identified and requisitioned the major forest resources to be harvested. They were on privately owned land; the owner had a long tradition of scientific forestry and was generally willing to assist in the wartime emergency despite the cost to their long-range forestry programmes. Their campsite was near completion by civilian contractors and No 30 Coy was thus to proceed directly on arrival, from the Clyde ports to their camp.
The majority of companies (18 of 30) remained at the same camp throughout their entire time in Scotland. No. 30 Coy was one of the Companies that stayed in one camp until it was time to prepare to get ready to go over to the mainland.

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Logging Operations

It is convenient at this point to describe the War Establishment of a Forestry Company, C.F.C. The Establishment (CDN/IV/1940/12A/1, DATED Mar 41) provides for a total of 194 all ranks, of whom six are officers: one Major as Commanding Officer, one Captain as Second in Command, one Adjutant, and three Subalterns "for Timber operations". Of these last, one is normally is in charge in the bush, one is in charge of the mill, and one is technical officer. There are 12 Sergeants, of whom two are Mill Foreman and five Bush Foreman, one a Blacksmith, one a M.T. Sergeant, one a Sergeant Cook, and two Assistant Instructors. It is not necessary or desirable to rehearse all the details here, as the Official Historian will have all War Establishments easily available to him; but it may be noted that the list of rank and file includes the following tradesmen: 2 Millwrights, 2 Sawyers, Forestry; 1 Electrician; 3 Motor Mechanics, one of whom is a Corporal, 1 Carpenter, 1 Plumber or Pipefitter; 1 Shoemaker, and 1 Tailor. Among the mass of non-tradesmen, the following groups are conspicuous: 20 Logmakers, 30 Rollers and Chainmen, 10 Road Cutters, 14 Drivers I.C. (Internal Combustion)
Re No. 29 Report

No. 30 Coy brought with them the most up-to-date logging equipment then available in Canada. They brought a standard medium type rotary mill with a capacity of 1500-2000 bd. ft. an hour or c. 8,000 cu. ft a week/3-5-4-7 cm an hour or 227 cm a week. (The British Forestry Commission also provided the company with a Scotch mill or bench, but these were not popular with the Canadians.) Power was supplied by 100-horsepowe Diesel generators. Logging equipment included TD9 caterpillar tractors, lorries, sulkies (pneumatic-tired arches), angle dozers for road making, and two and three drum winches for high-lead logging. They also were equipped with a variety of transportation vehicles, four tractors, two sulkies, one motorcycle, and originally six bicycles.

Heavy CFC logging truck
Courtesy of Al Neale - son of Pte Charles Frederick Neale

The heavy-laden Canadian lumber lorries from mills to shipping points placed a great deal of strain on local roads and access roads even when they were gravelled, particularly during rainy periods.
Even before felling could begin most companies had to introduce an access road network in the forests to enable their mechanized equipment to be used, in contrast to the widespread use of horses in prewar local forests. Road building and maintenance continued to occupy part of the CFC personnel even after the initial period.

The military role of the CFC as distinct from its industrial role was important, particularly during the period of possible German Invasion after the fall of France. Personnel were allowed to wear civilian clothing while working, but uniforms were required for military activities and when on leave. As combatant troops they received additional military training on Saturdays after their week's work in the woods. This included practice on rifle ranges and tactical exercises with other military units. Periodically they participated in weekend military schemes in their areas.

Companies usually worked in two sections, "one cutting 'in the bush' and bringing out the timber, the other sawing it into lumber in the company mill, and both using mostly Canadian mechanical equipment," The relative openness of the cultivated Scottish forests in contrast to the tangled undergrowth of most natural Canadian pleased the CFC. Nevertheless, pressure had to be applied to Canadian fallers to cut trees close to the ground in Scottish fashion, rather than higher up, which left unsightly stump-fields so common in home forestry operations. The felling crew consisted of three men, two sawing down and one trimming or limbing. Hand saws and axes were the tools employed. The trees involved reflected the variety of Scottish plantations, with Scot pine, spruce and larch particularly common, but also Douglas fir and hardwoods on occasion. The frequent alternation of rain and snow proved unexpected for many of the Canadians, accustomed to a more continuous snow season. Men's hands were often cut up by handling wet lumber in raw cold weather. Most of the area where they were working in Scotland lay north of 57degrees N, a higher latitude location than most forest operations in Canada-approximately the latitude of Mile 150 on the Alaska Highway (some 100 miles or 160 kilometers north of Fort St. John, B.C.), Fort McMurray, Alberta, Lynn Lake, Manitoba, and the Belcher Islands in Hudson Bay. Consequently, the longer winter darkness period in Scotland was an inconvenience for the felling teams at the extreme ends of the working day and working hours had to be adjusted to seasonal light conditions. (Companies worked a full-hour day, with precise hours decided by individual company commanders. There was no specific equipment provided for loading logs on trucks when they had to be transported to the mill. In most cases where the logging was conducted not too far from the mill, the trees could be taken tree length to the mill by the sulky and bucked (cut into log lengths) at the landing.

Total Production of Forest Products CFC Scotland
Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Life in Scotland

Church parades also brought them to the public's attention as the No. 7 Coy made use of the local church buildings as well as holding religious services in the camp.
The Chaplains of the Canadian Forestry Corps were attached to CFC HQ or to one of the District HQ to serve the needs of the soldiers.
For extra information on the Chaplains go to Chaplains of the CFC

Courtesy of "The Sawdust Fusiliers" by William C. Wonders

The Scottish people above all appreciated the kindness shown local children by members of the CFC. Christmas celebrations however, were the highlights. CFC personnel went out of their way to make the day memorable for the local children, many of whom came from poor crofts and many of whose fathers were away in the services

For further reading on Life in Scotland
Courtesy of "The Sawdust Fusiliers" by William C. Wonders

No. 30 Company was quite involved in sports (Company, District, Corps and Army)
For further reading .............
Courtesy of The Sawdust Fusiliers by William C. Wonders

Members of the CFC were seen in uniform regularly at local parades in support of varied wartime causes. In addition to their distinctive cap badges and shoulder patches, from Mar 1943 the CFC were identified by a green triangle below the 'Canada' flash on the upper arm of the battle dress. Church parades also brought them to the public's attention as the No 25 Coy made use of the local church buildings as well as holding religious services in the camp.

The Scottish people above all appreciated the kindness shown local children by members of the CFC. Christmas celebrations however, were the highlights. CFC personnel went out of their way to make the day memorable for the local children, many of whom came from poor crofts and many of whose fathers were away in the services.

Photos courtesy of Melanie McLennan

As Allied invasion preparations increased in late winter and spring of 1944 the CFC also prepared for movement across the Channel. At Lamington Park No. 9 Company noted "The Coast that lies only a few miles from us, after having been evacuated in December last year, bristles with training activities, The Firth (Cromarty) with float landing craft of various descriptions; the roar of guns that even shake our camp can be heard by day and night, the surrounding countryside is the site of several airfields and the activities of aircraft are carried out continually."
Beginning in the spring of 1944 further Canadian Forestry Corps companies were withdrawn from Scottish timber operations in preparations for the Invasion of Normandy. The Companies that went to the mainland were not comprised of the same men. The men that were to go over were selected by the officers who were chosen to lead the men. The officers had to keep in mind in the selection that they needed men with certain skills and were they young enough for the job. Going to the mainland was different from working in Scotland. Companies No. 5, 15, 16, 28, and 30 made up No. 1 Canadian Forestry Group, mobilized 1 May 1944, with its headquarters located briefly at Wilderness Camp and then at Beaufort Castle. (A further five companies joined them subsequently, which was Companies No. 1, 9, 14, 25 and 27. The first five companies were sent to Carronbridge Camp just north of Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, for further military training. The men of these first five companies thought they were the cream of the crop until they heard that they on their way to Belgium. They proceeded directly to a staging area at Lancing, Sussex, in southern England. The first companies crossed the Channel from Portsmouth to Normandy beaches in the last days in July and the first in August 1944. From there they moved with the First Canadian Army in the advance across North-West Europe.
Ref: The Sawdust Fusiliers by William Wonders

Extra training Carronbridge Camp near Thornhill, Dumfriesshire
Photo Courtesy of Linda Bish daughter of Pte Edward 'Ted' James Bish No.28 Coy CFC

Companies No. 5, 15, 16, 28, and 30 made up No. 1 Canadian Forestry Group, mobilized 1 May 1944, with its headquarters located briefly at Wilderness Camp and then at Beaufort Castle. A further five companies joined them subsequently, which was Companies No. 1, 9, 14, 25 and 27.) The first five companies were sent to Carronbridge Camp just north of Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, for further military training. The men of these first five companies thought they were the cream of the crop until they heard that the other five companies were on their way to Belgium in October 1944. The first group proceeded directly to a staging area at Lancing, Sussex, in southern England. The first companies crossed the Channel from Portsmouth to Normandy beaches in the last days in July and the first in August 1944. From there they moved with the First Canadian Army in the advance across North-West Europe. Source: 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C Wonders

For further info on No.30 Coy in North West Europe go to
HQ NO 8 CANADIAN FORESTRY DISTRICT

No.30 CAN FORESTRY CORPS S.E. OF NIEMAGEN HOLLAND 1944
Photo Courtesy of Wayne Johnson

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - War Brides

Hall, John Hubert Pte K98499 married Miss Mary Colvin
Klaudt, Bernard (Barney) Pte K70292 married Miss Florence Mary Tideswell
Watkinson, Thomas Pte K41338 married Miss Catherine Edith Campbell

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Photos and stories of the soldiers

Letter home to Mother Mrs Hilda Anderson - from son Pte Henning Anderson
From: Maureen Evans
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 4:30 AM
To: Bob Briggs
Subject: Re: forgot
I Maureen Anderson Evans, The Daughter of PVt. H. W. Anderson, give my permission for his photos and letters on the Canadian Forestry Corps Website.
Thank you, Maureen Evans

Voght, Timothy Pte K41384
From: Vicki
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 11:23 AM
To: rj.gonefishing@shaw.ca
Subject: Canadian Forestry Corp, No. 30 Aug 1943 Company photo
Mr. Bob Briggs,
Good afternoon Mr. Briggs, I was searching online and looking for any information on the Canadian Forestry Corp WW2 and to my surprise I found my grandfathers Company photo. I am looking for any information on how to obtain a copy of the No. 30 Aug 1943 Company photo. My late grandfather Timothy Voght is in that photo. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much.
Being present for roll call and marching at the Remembrance Day ceremonies was very important to him. I asked Grandpa a few times about the war, he would get sad and not say too much about it. Grandpa was a very hard worker, he built his own log home and 4 cabins at his ranch. He worked with team horses that cleared the land and eventually cut hay in his fields. He was a blacksmith, a cowboy and a very good hunter and trapper. I miss him dearly.
Sincerely, Vicki

From: Tom Watkinson
Sent: Tuesday, October 22, 2013 5:15 PM
To: rj.gonefishing@shaw.ca
Subject: Searching for my father
Hi Bob, I was looking at the information on the Canadian Forestry Corps today. My father was stationed in Scotland during the mid part of WWII. He was Private Thomas Watkinson K41338 CFC. I do not know what company he was with, however, I suspect it was Company 30 which may have been stationed near Bonar Bridge, in camp Skibo A Spinningdale or Skibo B Spinningdale. I am trying to find out when and where he signed up, and where his company went after they left Inverness on about June 22, 1944. My father married Catherine Edith Campbell Watkinson and my older brother Frederick Donald Campbell Watkinson was born in Dingwall June 20, 1944. I am trying to figure out when dad's company went into Normandy. I believe it was the last week of June 1944 and then where they fought. Dad would not talk about the war when we were young except if he had been drinking. Dad died August 3, 1978 at the age of 65.
I am trying to write our family's story and this is vital.
Thanks, Tom A. Watkinson (Jr.) - Photos courtesy of Thomas Watkinson Jr. - son

No. 30 Company Canadian Forestry Corps - Company Photos
Why are some soldiers missing from the company photo's


No. 30 Company Aug 1943
Larger Photo
National Defense Directorate of History and Heritage
& for further reference Library And Archives Canada Military Heritage
Courtesy of Jean-Francois Chicoine

No. 30 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Soldiers List

List of Abbreviations - Library and Archives Canada
ABBREVIATIONS and ACRONYMS of WW2 and service records
Military Districts of Canada 1939
Calgary Military Historical Society

Access to Information (ATI) Online Request – to obtain the services records for a soldier

No.30 Coy Barrack Damages - No 30 Coy CFC War Diaries Library And Archives Canada Military Heritage
The undermentioned personnel will be SOS No 30 Coy CFC to Units indicated hereunder - Library And Archives Canada Military Heritage

Aird, George McCrae Pte H56385 postal clk - transf from No.17 Coy - See No 8 CFD transf to WR COF
Anderson, Henning Gustav William Pte K41566 Transf to No.1 Coy & No.16 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Austin, Samuel W. Sgt K41132 Transf to No.17 Coy
Balocz, A.W. Cpl K41156 Transf to No.1 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Barrett, A. Pte G41690
Belson, Percy William Major Transf from No.18 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Bernie, W. Lt
Birnie, William Capt CO - transf from No.1 Coy - See No 8 CFD transf to HQ No 1 CFG
Bisnett, C.A. Pte K41147 Transf to No.17 Coy
Bizzell, H.A. Sgt K41191
Boardman, H.L. Pte K41150 Transf to No.1 Coy & No.16 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Bohnet, Ernest Arnold Sgt K41245 bush foreman ‘B’ - transf from No 11 DD Vancouver & No.29 Coy - See No 8 CFD & CFC Casualties
Boyd, R.J. CSM B76427
Brenton, Henry Pte K71448 engine artificer 'B' - transf from No.29 Coy & No.10 Coy & No.1 CSFS - See No 8 CFD & CFC Casualties
Brown, Richard Nelson Pte K47099 Transf to No.9 Coy
Brown, W. Pte K73885
Brownscombe, H,W. Pte K41126
Bryde, A. Pte K41173 Transf to No.17 Coy
Bush, R.E. Pte K41170
Campbell, D.G. Pte K63178 Transf to HQ No 7 CFD
Carbert, Gordon Franklin Pte K41434 Transf from No.29 Coy
Capel, Albert William ASgt K41062 Transf to RCASC att No.9 Coy
Carbert, Gordon Franklin Pte K41434 Transf from No.29 Coy & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Casper, M.F. Pte K41192 Transf from No.29 Coy transf to No.9 Coy
Cassidy, W.M. ACpl K41366 Transf to No.17 Coy
Chambers, G. Pte K41114
Chambers, R.F. Pte K98029
Chew, E.C. Pte K62686
Clapperton, Duncan Pte Transf to No 1 CSFS
Clarke, W.J. Pte K41383
Collins, James Cameron Sgt K41139 Transf to OCTU & No.6 Coy & No.20 Coy & No.10 Coy & No 1 CSFS & No.15 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Coulas, A. Sgt C70334 Transf from No.12 Coy & No 5 DD transf to No.1 Coy
Cunningham, Robert Kenneth Capt 2I/C - transf from No.14 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Curtis, George Edward Capt M.M. Adj - transf from No.22 Coy & No.16 Coy- See No 8 CFD & HQ No 7 CFD
Darnshaw, K.J. Pte K29
Diamond, C.F. Pte K70660 Transf to No.21 Coy
Diewart, E. Pte K41193
Docker, M.G.I. Pte H94665 Transf from No.29 Coy
Edmunds, A.W. Pte K67680
Ellis, T.G. Pte K76277
Evans, A.J. Pte K41120
Fetzco, P. Pte K41121
Fillingham, Charles Edward CSM E38232 Transf from No.16 Coy & No.8 Coy & No.1 Coy transf to No.28 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Fisher, Rupert Seldon "Rupe" Sgt F77182 Transf from No.13 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Fordham, B.J. Pte K41143
Ford, Herbert Cyril Pte K41122 Transf to No.17 Coy
France, D. Pte K41290
Gabourie, C. Pte K41386
Gawne, E.B. Pte K41134 Transf to No.29 Coy
Gaynor, C.C. Pte K41213
Gilliard, A.L. Pte K41176
Gilmour, A.M. Cpl K73493 Transf to HQ CFC & HQ No 5 Dist & HQ No 1 CFG & HQ No 7 CFD
Goude, W.J. Pte K41131
Gowan, S.O. Pte K41113
Gowlland, R.J. Pte K678833 Transf to No.6 Coy & No 1 CIRU
Graham, C.J. Sgt K41118 Transf to No.17 Coy
Haftkovich, A. Pte K41343 Transf to No.9 Coy
Hall, John Hubert Pte K98499 Transf from No 11 DD Trans & Cdn Corps Petrol Park RCASC & No.7 Coy & HQ CFC - See CFC Casualties
Hamilton, B.K. Pte K47318
Handley, E. Pte K42391 Transf to No.17 Coy
Hanes, H.G. Pte K41318 Transf to No.17 Coy
Hare, R.J. Pte K41330
Hedplak, W. Pte K41219
Henderson, N.C. Pte K41268
Heyd, N.H. Pte K41265
Higginson, John B. Pte K41198 Transf to No.10 Coy & No 1 CSFS & No.10 Coy & RCE
Holland, J. Pte K41342
Hollinshead, Stanley B. Pte K41233 Transf to No.17 Coy
Hollis, C.G. LCpl F1221
Holt, L.P. Pte K76295 Transf to No.17 Coy
Horne, R.D. Sgt K98043
Houghton, H.W. Pte L50226
Howard, E.A. Pte K41228
Howell, T.R. Pte K41243
Huntsley, L.C. Pte Transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Hutch, W.F. Pte K65016 Transf from No.26 Coy
Imming, T.H.N. LCpl K42848
Iverson, O. Pte K41117 Transf to No.1 Coy
Jackson, J.C. Pte F67541
Joe, S.A. Pte K41390
Johansen, A. Pte K41155 Transf to No.17 Coy
Johnson, John Albert Lt K98622 mill officer - transf from OCTU & No.6 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Johnson, M.A. Pte K41284 Transf to No.17 Coy
Johnson, R. Cpl K41069
Johnson, Robert S. LCpl K41282 Transf to No.17 Coy
Johnson, Waldemar Philip LCpl K41348 Transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Johnston, A.L. Pte K41389
Johnston, William Alexander Annandale S/Sgt K41129 Transf to HQ No 1 CFG
Jones, D.R. Pte K41197
Kamano, Phillip Wilson Pte K41304 Transf to No.17 Coy
Kedziora, Laudys William Joseph Pte K41183
Kenyon, Archibald James Pte K41263 Transf to RCASC - See CFC Casualties
Kerr, W.T. Pte K41297
King, Dennis Montgomery Lt mill officer - transf to No.9 Coy & transf to No 1 NETD
Kirkaldy, John Pte K41180 - See CFC Casualties
Klaudt, Bernard Barney Pte K70292 Transf from IrFus(VR) - See CFC Casualties
Knott, A. Pte C34354 Transf from No.28 Coy
Krawetz, S.M. Pte K75907
Lackie, L.J. Pte K41374
Lahay, D.J. Pte K41196 Transf to No.9 Coy
Lahay, John H. Pte K41316 Transf to No.17 Coy
Lahay, L. Pte K31038 Transf to No.17 Coy
Langford, Raymond M. Pte F95656 Transf from No.29 Coy transf to No.17 Coy
Lanyon, J.W. Pte K41312 engine artificer - transf to No 1 CSFS
Ledger, A.J. Pte K41313
Lee, M.R. Pte K41404
Lilly, D.S. Pte K41362
Lingle, G.O. Pte K41382 Transf to No.8 Coy
Lougheed, F.N. Pte K67014
Love, T. Pte K41305
Lukowski, A. Pte K41250
Lund, E. Pte K41369 Transf to No.17 Coy
MacDonald, A. ACQMS K41356 Transf to No.17 Coy
Mack, Achille ‘Ducky’ Pte K41157 Transf to No.17 Coy
MacKenzie, A. Sgt K62836 Transf to No 1 CSFS
MacLeod, Kenneth Edward Pte D113148 Transf from No.9 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Madden, A.J. Pte K41204 Transf to No.26 Coy
Major, F, Pte K42893 Transf to No.17 Coy
Mannella, R.J. Pte B22841 Transf from No.28 Coy
Martin, R. Pte K41260 Transf to No.17 Coy
Matheson, A. Pte K57834 Transf to No 1 CSFS
Mathews, W.J. Lt K41126 Transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Mathier, E. Pte C34353
McArthur, A.J. Pte K41208 Transf to No.17 Coy
McDonald, D.H. Pte K41272
McDonald, J.A. Pte K41167
McDonald, J.G. Pte K62669
McFayden, Glenn Maurice Pte H56347 Transf from No.17 Coy - See No 8 CFD
McFie, W.S. Pte K41279 Transf to No.17 Coy
McKamey, Frederick L. Pte K41262 Transf to No 1 CSFS & CScotR
McKay, Frederick James Sgt H56310 Transf from No.17 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD - See No 8 CFD & COF
McKenzie, Archibald T. Sgt K41042 bush foreman - transf to No 1 CSFS
McLeod, M.N. Pte K41159
McMahon, G.R. Pte H94800 Transf to No.1 Coy & No.28 Coy - See No 7 CFD
McRae, C.E. Pte L50225
Melvin, F.E. Pte K41955 Transf to No.17 Coy
Mercer, R.J. Pte K41071
Micheal, B.D. Pte K41395 Transf to No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Mickelson, (Rod) Roderic Charles Pte K71968
Mills, H.H. Sgt K41212 Transf to No.17 Coy
Minns, George William Pte K41354 Transf to CFC HQ & OCTU & No.24 Coy & HQ No 1 CFG
Minotte, M. Pte K41249
Mitchell, R. Pte K70718 Transf to No.29 Coy
Montgomery, G. Pte K70640
Moore, E.B. Pte F30724 Transf to No.1 Coy & No.28 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Morneau, Emil James ‘Skinner’ Pte H11145 Transf from No.17 Coy & Reinf Sect
Moroz, A.F. Pte K41399 Transf to No.21 Coy
Morrissey, Joseph Joe Richard Pte K41154 Transf to No.10 Coy
Nicol, T. Pte L10354
Nordin, L. Pte K41293 Transf from No.26 Coy
Oelrich, John Pte K41402 Transf to No.10 Coy
Olafson, C.A. Pte K41241 Transf to No.17 Coy
Olafson, O.W. Pte K41174
Oldershaw, W.R. Pte K73949 Transf to No 1 CSFS
Ostle, J. Pte K92404
Otiquam, Benedict Anthony Pte H62937 Transf from No.29 Coy transf to No.4 Coy
Patry, L.A. Pte C76059 Transf from No.9 Coy transf to No 2 Detach
Paul, Francis Pte K41277 Transf to No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Pearson, Axel Pte K41298 Trans from No 11 MD CFC Wing BC transf to No.17 Coy & No 11 DD - See CFC Casualties
Penrose, R.F. Pte K75296 Transf to No 5 Det
Penttila, Henry Veino Pte K41276 Transf to No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Petty, W.B. Pte K41350 Transf to No.23 Coy
Pick, E. Pte K41164
Pick, H. Pte K41152 Transf from No.28 Coy transf to No.17 Coy
Pierce, Edward Ernest Miller Lt Adj - transf to No.25 Coy
Pierre, C. Pte K41398
Poncelot, H.J. LCpl K41368 Transf to No.17 Coy
Porter, P.S. ACpl K76295 Transf to HQ CFC
Powell, F. Pte K41257 Transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Powell, W. J. Pte K41315
Press, Hector Joseph Pte C63027 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No.8 CFD & CFC Casualties
Proulx, J.A. Pte K41067 Transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Ray, F. Pte K72949
Reid, D.H.H. Pte K41337
Rennison, M.C. Pte K41311
Reynolds, R.F. Pte K41261 RCASC att to No.30 Coy transf to Reinf Sect & No.10 Coy
Richardson, A.W. Pte K41306 Transf to No.29 Coy
Riddell, Theodore Alexandre Capt transp officer - See No 8 CFD transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Ritchie, W.R. Pte K41179 Transf from No.26 Coy transf to No 1 CSFS
Roach, Allen Ambrose Pte K41251 Transf to No.18 Coy & No.27 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Robertson, H.T. Pte K42142
Robertson, J. Sgt M16046 Transf from Reinf Sect & No.22 Coy
Robertson, O.C. Pte K41339
Robertson, Thomas Eric Pte K41221 - See No 8 CFD
Rockwell, Irvin ‘Rocky’ Capt Transf to No 1 CSFS & No.24 Coy & No.16 Coy
Rollston, W.F. Pte K62424
Romain, S. Cpl H62681 Transf from No.17 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Rowley, C. Pte K41161
Ryan, Henry Patrick Pte H56318 driver mech 'C' - transf from No.17 Coy transf to No.14 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Ryder, S.M. Pte K41226 Transf to No.17 Coy
Samoriday, M. Pte K70364
Samuelson, J. LCpl K41295 Transf to No.17 Coy
Schreiber, C.P. Cpl K41310 Transf to No.26 Coy
Shritt, George Pte K41135 Transf to No.9 Coy
Scott, Charles Mersereau Lt Transf to No.29 Coy & No.9 Coy
Sennie, E. Pte H94406 Transf from No.24 Coy
Simmonds, J.R. Sgt K53567 RCASC att to No.30 Coy & No.26 Coy & Gen Workshop & No.10 Coy
Smilser, W.K. Pte K41376
Smith, G.E. CQMS K40075
Sohye, G. Pte K41401
Sorenson, S.A. Pte K41151
Spence, W. Pte K4135
Spiers, R.E. Pte K41202 Transf to No.26 Coy
Springall, V.A. Pte K62657
Spurr, D.R. ASgt K41163 Transf to No.17 Coy
Staaf, C.I. Pte K41364
Stapleton, Frank T. Pte K67565 Transf to No.17 Coy & Irish Fusiliers
Stephens, E.A. Pte H95502
Struthers, S. Pte K41256 Transf to No.17 Coy
Sunenberg, P. Pte K41206
Swain, F.B. Pte Transf to HQ CFC
Sylvester, Pierre Pte K41319
Towigishig, Peter Pte H69968 Transf from No.28 Coy
Trenholme, F. Pte K41214
Turmel, Roland Pte E36125 Transf from No.3 Coy & No.22 Coy transf to HQ No 1 CFG & CRD
Tvaitin, K.T. Pte K41155
Tyerman, H.E. CSM K72965 Transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Uapleby, C. Pte K41274
Unrau, C. Pte K41111
Unrau, J. Pte K41209 Transf to No.17 Coy
Upperborn, Donald J.E. Pte K41403 Transf to No.9 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Vikan, S. Pte K41308
Vliet, H.C. LCpl K41342 Transf to No.17 Coy
Virgin, A.N. Pte C58133 Transf from No.28 Coy transf to No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Voght, Timothy Pte K41384 - See No 8 CFD
Walker, S.N. Pte F95597
Warner, W. Pte K41224 Transf to No.23 Coy
Warren, R. Pte K41359 Transf to No.17 Coy
Watkinson, Thomas Pte K41338 Transf to & from No.28 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Webb, William Thomas Lt L2431 Transf from No 12 DD transf & No.20 Coy & OCTU & No.9 Coy transf to No.29 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Welch, H.S. Pte K41203 Transf to No.17 Coy
Weldon, L.E. Cpl K61342 Transf to No.17 Coy
Whittaker, F.K. Pte K24061
Whittingham, J.S. Pte K53436 Transf to No.17 Coy
Wick, H.R. Pte K41199 Transf to No.17 Coy
Williams, Richard Dennis Pte K100125
Williams, T.E. Rusty Pte K41244
Winstone, W. Pte K41181 Transf to No.1 Coy
Woodard, Frank Pte D46946 batman - transf from Reinf Sect & No.1 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Wright, J. Sgt
Wylie, J.A. Pte K41201 Transf to Reinf Sect
Wyman, M.D. Cpl M55567 Transf from No.19 Coy
Yoe, Charles Pte K41184
Youman, B. Pte K41287 Transf to No.17 Coy

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