Knight Family Tree - aqwg622

Descendants of Richard And Sarah Rogers Knight


Samuel BALL-10420 was born on 16 Mar 1647 in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts. He died on 13 Sep 1689 in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts. Samuel married Mary GRAVES-10421 on 15 Jan 1671 in Hatfield, , Massachusetts.

BIOGRAPHY: According to the book, "Genealogy of the Graves family in America," page 12, Samuel's wife Mary Graves was "born in Wethersfield, Conn., about 1654, md. (1) Samuel Ball of Springfield, Mass., January 15, 1671.  He died and she md. (2) Sept. 10, 1690, Benjamin Stebbins."  In the footnote it says, "Samuel and Mary (Graves) Ball had a daughter, Mary, who md. Ensign John Hitchcock..." and traces their descendants to President Grover Cleveland.     
 
Samuel is also mentioned in the book, "The first century of the history of Springfield; the official records from 1636 to 1736, with an historical review and biographical mention of the founders" found here: https://archive.org/details/firstcenturyofhi01spri.  
 
Samuel is also mentioned in the book, "The Stebbins genealogy," which can be found here: https://archive.org/details/stebbinsgenealog01gree.  See page 61.  According to this source, "Samuel Ball, son of Abigail Burt and Francis Ball, was born March 16, 1647, at Springfield, Massachusetts; died September 13, 1689, at Springfield, Massachusetts; married January 15, 1671, probably at Hatfield, Massachusetts, to Mary Graves, born about 1654, at Wethersfield, Connecticut, died May 21, 1727, at Springfield, Massachusetts, daughter of John Graves of Hadley, Massachusetts, and Mary Smith.  Mary Graves Ball was married, second, March 11, 1690 (Graves Genealogy says September 10, 1690) at Springfield, Massachusetts, to Benjamin Stebbins, born April 11, 1658, at Springfield, Massachusetts,   died October 12, 1698, at Springfield, Massachusetts, son of Lieut. Thomas Stebbins and Hannah Wright.  Mary Graves Ball Stebbins was married third, December 29, 1704, to James Warriner.  
Children:  
Mary Ball
Francis Ball
Elizabeth Ball
Mercy Ball
Abigail Ball
There is some additional information about each child, and a lot of additional information about Abigail.   There is also some more information about a run-in that Samuel had when he was young with the local Puritan law for talking back to his step-father.  Samuel's father died when he was only about a year old, and his mother married Benjamin Munn, who lived until 1675.  
 
There is also some additional information about the Ball family on this website: http://dunhamwilcox.net/source_files/ball.htm.  This website quotes a document dated 12 Apr 1649; Springfield, Hampden Co., MA, which was the marriage contract of his mother Abigail Burt Ball with Benjamin Munn of Hartford assuring that his mother & Benjamin were sworn to pay £14 either in pay when Samuel reached the age of twenty or in providing an apprenticeship before that time. Samuel is listed as about 1 year of age.  There is also a reference to a military battle in which Samuel participated -  Falls Fight took place on 19 May 1676, and Samuel Ball apparently participated in the fight.  According to this website, Samuel may have worked as a brick maker or brick layer or both.
 
It appears that Samuel lived his entire life in Springfield, although the above-mentioned website indicates that Samuel took the Oath of Freemanship/Allegiance in September 1684 in Northampton, Hampshire Co., MA.  Maybe he intended to remove there, but his death was recorded in Springfield vital records, so I am not sure if that happened?  In the Sources section below are multiple attachments to Springfield vital records, documenting his birth, the birth of his five children, and his death.  He died young - only 42 years old - and his wife remarried twice after his death.  
 
Springfield was founded in 1636 by English Puritan William Pynchon as "Agawam Plantation" under the administration of the Connecticut Colony. In 1641 it was renamed after Pynchon's hometown of Springfield, Essex, England, following incidents that precipitated the settlement joining the Massachusetts Bay Colony. During its early existence, Springfield flourished as both an agricultural settlement and trading post, although its prosperity waned dramatically during (and after) King Philip's War in 1675, when natives laid siege to it and burned it to the ground.

The Battle of Turner's Falls, also known as the Peskeompscut massacre, was fought on May 19, 1676, during King Philip's War, in present-day Gill, Massachusetts, near a falls on the Connecticut River. The site is across the river from the village of Turners Falls. A band of English colonists under the command of Captain William Turner fell upon the poorly guarded Indian village of Peskeompscut near the falls at dawn, slaughtering many of its inhabitants. Many of the warriors in the camp escaped, and they regrouped with those from other nearby camps to dispute the English retreat, during which Turner was killed.

There is an extensive account of the battle and the colonists' reasons for attacking contained in a book authored by George Madison Bodge and reprinted by the Genealogical Publishing Company in 1967. The account includes a description of the battle, a listing of many of the soldiers who fought with the colonists, the soldiers who were slain in the battle, and soldiers or their descendants who were entitled to land due to their participation in the battle.  Posthumously, Samuel's son-in-law, Mary's husband, was granted, 23 Jun 1736, land in Falltown, MA, near the Upper Falls of the Connecticut River where the Falls Fight took place, due to his father-in-law's participation in the battle.  
 
Samuel's daughter Mercy died young but he was outlived by his other 4 known children.  
 
There is some information about Samuel's father, Francis, in the book, "Francis Ball's descendents; or The West Springfield Ball family, from 1640-1902," which can be found online here:  https://archive.org/details/francisballsdesc01ball.  See page 15 (Samuel's section starts on page 22).  It appears that Samuel's father died when Samuel was only about 1 years old, having drowned in the Connecticut River.  I think that Samuel had only 1 older brother, his father having died so young.  Samuel did, however, have several half-siblings after his mother remarried - one half-sister and four half-brothers.  According to this same source, Samuel for at least a period of time made his home in Northampton.  The land making up the bulk of modern Northampton was sold to settlers from Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1653.  Northampton sits approximately 15 miles north of the City of Springfield. - Familysearch.org

Mary GRAVES-10421 was born in 1654 in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut. She died on 21 May 1727 in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts. She was buried in Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts. Mary married Samuel BALL-10420 on 15 Jan 1671 in Hatfield, , Massachusetts.

BIOGRAPHY: According to the book, "Genealogy of the Graves family in America," page 12, which can be found here: https://archive.org/details/genealogyofgrave01grav, Mary's grandfather was Thomas Graves who came to America before 1645 with his wife and several adult children and settled first in Hartford.  Mary's father was the second son, John, who was born in England but died in America.  John apparently moved to Wethersfield and on May 18, 1654 was made a freeman there.  He then married Mary Smith and lived for a time in Wethersfield.  Due perhaps to a schism in the local church, John moved with wife and children, along with his father and brother Isaac, to Hadley, Massachusetts in 1661.  John was killed in an Indian attack September 19, 1677.  Before his death, he and his wife had 10 children, of which Mary was the second.  
 
Again according to the same source, Mary Graves was "born in Wethersfield, Conn., about 1654, md. (1) Samuel Ball of Springfield, Mass., January 15, 1671. He died and she md. (2) Sept. 10, 1690, Benjamin Stebbins." In the footnote it says, "Samuel and Mary (Graves) Ball had a daughter, Mary, who md. Ensign John Hitchcock..." and traces their descendants to President Grover Cleveland.
 
Husband Samuel is also mentioned in the book, "The first century of the history of Springfield; the official records from 1636 to 1736, with an historical review and biographical mention of the founders" found here: https://archive.org/details/firstcenturyofhi01spri.
 
Samuel and Mary are also mentioned in the book, "The Stebbins genealogy," which can be found here: https://archive.org/details/stebbinsgenealog01gree. See page 61. According to this source, "Samuel Ball, son of Abigail Burt and Francis Ball, was born March 16, 1647, at Springfield, Massachusetts; died September 13, 1689, at Springfield, Massachusetts; married January 15, 1671, probably at Hatfield, Massachusetts, to Mary Graves, born about 1654, at Wethersfield, Connecticut, died May 21, 1727, at Springfield, Massachusetts, daughter of John Graves of Hadley, Massachusetts, and Mary Smith. Mary Graves Ball was married, second, March 11, 1690 (Graves Genealogy says September 10, 1690) at Springfield, Massachusetts, to Benjamin Stebbins, born April 11, 1658, at Springfield, Massachusetts, died October 12, 1698, at Springfield, Massachusetts, son of Lieut. Thomas Stebbins and Hannah Wright. Mary Graves Ball Stebbins was married third, December 29, 1704, to James Warriner.
Children of Mary and Samuel Ball:
Mary Ball
Francis Ball
Elizabeth Ball
Mercy Ball
Abigail Ball
There is some additional information about each child, and a lot of additional information about Abigail.
 
There is also some additional information about the Ball family on this website: http://dunhamwilcox.net/source_files/ball.htm. There is a reference to a military battle in which Samuel participated - Falls Fight took place on 19 May 1676, and Samuel Ball apparently participated in the fight.
 
It appears that Samuel lived his entire life in Springfield, although the above-mentioned website indicates that Samuel took the Oath of Freemanship/Allegiance in September 1684 in Northampton, Hampshire Co., MA. Maybe he intended to remove there, but his death was recorded in Springfield vital records, so I am not sure if that happened? In the Sources section below are multiple attachments to Springfield vital records, documenting the birth of most of Mary's five children. Her first husband died young - only 42 years old - and Mary wife remarried twice after his death.
 
Springfield was founded in 1636 by English Puritan William Pynchon as "Agawam Plantation" under the administration of the Connecticut Colony. In 1641 it was renamed after Pynchon's hometown of Springfield, Essex, England, following incidents that precipitated the settlement joining the Massachusetts Bay Colony. During its early existence, Springfield flourished as both an agricultural settlement and trading post, although its prosperity waned dramatically during (and after) King Philip's War in 1675, when natives laid siege to it and burned it to the ground.

The Battle of Turner's Falls, also known as the Peskeompscut massacre, was fought on May 19, 1676, during King Philip's War, in present-day Gill, Massachusetts, near a falls on the Connecticut River. The site is across the river from the village of Turners Falls. A band of English colonists under the command of Captain William Turner fell upon the poorly guarded Indian village of Peskeompscut near the falls at dawn, slaughtering many of its inhabitants. Many of the warriors in the camp escaped, and they regrouped with those from other nearby camps to dispute the English retreat, during which Turner was killed.

There is an extensive account of the battle and the colonists' reasons for attacking contained in a book authored by George Madison Bodge and reprinted by the Genealogical Publishing Company in 1967. The account includes a description of the battle, a listing of many of the soldiers who fought with the colonists, the soldiers who were slain in the battle, and soldiers or their descendants who were entitled to land due to their participation in the battle. Posthumously, Mary and Samuel's son-in-law, Mary the daughter's husband, was granted, 23 Jun 1736, land in Falltown, MA, near the Upper Falls of the Connecticut River where the Falls Fight took place, due to his father-in-law's participation in the battle.
 
Mary's daughter Mercy died young and she outlived Francis as well.   
 
There is some information about Samuel's father, Francis, in the book, "Francis Ball's descendents; or The West Springfield Ball family, from 1640-1902," which can be found online here: https://archive.org/details/francisballsdesc01ball. See page 15 (Samuel's section starts on page 22). According to this same source, Samuel for at least a period of time made his home in Northampton. The land making up the bulk of modern Northampton was sold to settlers from Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1653. Northampton sits approximately 15 miles north of the City of Springfield.

Mary's second husband, Benjamin Stebbins, was from Springfield.  They were married for 8 years before he died young at the age of 40.  Mary was then single for about 6 years when she married James Warriner. - Familysearch.org

They had the following children.

  F i Abigail BALL-10419 was born on 18 Aug 1682. She died on 4 Dec 1760.

Jacob SANDUSKY-10424 was born in 1768 in Moorefield, Hardy, West Virginia. He died in Jan 1847 in Clementsville, Taylor, Kentucky. Jacob married Rebeccah SHERRILL-10425 on 25 Dec 1806 in Washington County, Kentucky.

Rebeccah SHERRILL-10425 was born on 16 Jun 1781 in Union County, North Carolina. She died in 1847 in Casey County, Kentucky. Rebeccah married Jacob SANDUSKY-10424 on 25 Dec 1806 in Washington County, Kentucky.

They had the following children.

  M i Levi Jacob SANDUSKY-10422 was born on 22 Dec 1815. He died on 23 Dec 1887.

Amos W. KNIGHT [Parents]-40209 was born on 25 Apr 1805 in Ashe County, North Carolina. He died on 5 Apr 1873 in Lebanon, Laclede, Missouri. Amos married Abana CONNETTA-18399 on 29 Dec 1828 in Guilford, North Carolina.

DEATH: Amos Knight in the Missouri, Wills and Probate Records, 1766-1988
Name: Amos Knight
Probate Date: 31 Mar 1875
Probate Place: Cass, Missouri, USA
Inferred Death Year: Abt 1875
Inferred Death Place: Missouri, USA
Source Citation: Author: Missouri. Probate Court (Cass County); Probate Place: Cass, Missouri
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Missouri, Wills and Probate Records, 1766-1988 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
Original data: Missouri, County, District and Probate Courts.

Abana CONNETTA-18399 was born in 1809 in North Carolina. She died in 1855 in Ashe County, North Carolina. Abana married Amos W. KNIGHT-40209 on 29 Dec 1828 in Guilford, North Carolina.

MARRIAGE: Abana Connetta in the North Carolina, Marriage Index, 1741-2004
Name: Abana Connetta
Spouse: Ammiel Knight
Marriage Date: 29 Dec 1828
Marriage County: Guilford
Marriage State: North Carolina
Source: Family History Library, Salt Lake City, UT
Source Citation: Data Source: County Court Records - FHL # 0536823-0536828

They had the following children.

  M i
William Willet KNIGHT-10428 was born on 1 Mar 1832 in North Fork District, Ashe, North Carolina. He died on 8 Jan 1913 in Ashe, North Carolina. He was buried in 1913 in , Ashe, North Carolina.
  F ii
Elvira KNIGHT-43483 was born in 1834 in North Carolina.
  M iii
Levi KNIGHT-43484 was born in 1836 in North Carolina.
  F iv
Louzena KNIGHT-43485 was born in Feb 1838 in North Carolina.
  F v
Louisa KNIGHT-43486 was born in 1842 in North Carolina.
  F vi
Synthia L. KNIGHT-43487 was born on 22 May 1842 in Le Noir, North Carolina. She died on 11 Sep 1915 in Pikeville, Bledsoe, Tennessee.
  M vii
Abram KNIGHT-43488 was born in 1844 in North Carolina.
  F viii
Susan KNIGHT-43489 was born in 1846 in North Carolina.
  F ix
Mariah KNIGHT-43490 was born in 1847 in North Carolina.
  M x
Milton Sanders KNIGHT [scrapbook]-43491 was born in May 1850 in Ashe, North Carolina. He died on 23 Sep 1935 in Redstone, Sheridan, Montana. He was buried in 1935 in Redstone, Sheridan, Montana.



MEDIA: MK7175 - Milton Sanders Knight s/o Amos W. & Abana Connetta Knight – Ancestry.com
  F xi
Amanda KNIGHT-43492 was born in 1855 in North Carolina.

Jabez BURDICK [Parents]-10432 was born on 16 May 1755 in North Stonington, New London, Connecticut. He died on 21 Sep 1822 in Berlin, Rensselaer, New York. He was buried in Marble Post Cemetery, Berlin, Rensselaer, New York. Jabez married Elizabeth WHITFORD-10433 in 1776.

BURIAL: Jabez Burdick in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Name:Jabez Burdick
Birth Date:16 May 1755
Birth Place:Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, United States of America
Death Date:21 Sep 1822
Death Place:Berlin, Rensselaer County, New York, United States of America
Cemetery:Marble Post Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Berlin, Rensselaer County, New York, United States of America
Has Bio?:Y
Children:
Sybil Millard
Jessee Burdick
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.

BIRTH: Jabez Burdick in the Connecticut Town Birth Records, pre-1870 (Barbour Collection)
Name:Jabez Burdick
[Jabez Burdict]
Gender:Male
Birth Date:16 May 1755
Birth Place:Stonington
Parent:John
Parent:Sibbel
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Connecticut Town Birth Records, pre-1870 (Barbour Collection) [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.
Original data: White, Lorraine Cook, ed. The Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Vital Records. Vol. 1-55. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1994-2002.

Elizabeth WHITFORD-10433 was born in Jun 1757 in Berlin, Rensselaer, New York. She died on 22 Feb 1856 in Genesee, Monroe, New York. She was buried in Little Rhode Island Cemetery, Little Genesee, Allegany, New York. Elizabeth married Jabez BURDICK-10432 in 1776.

BURIAL: Elizabeth Whitford Burdick in the Web: New York, Find A Grave Index, 1660-2012
Name:Elizabeth Whitford Burdick
Birth Date:Jun 1757
Age at Death:98
Death Date:22 Feb 1856
Burial Place:Little Genesee, Allegany County, New York, USA
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Web: New York, Find A Grave Index, 1660-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 1 February 2013.

BIOGRAPHY: Elizabeth Whitford in the U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970
Name:Elizabeth Whitford
Birth Date:1758
Death Date:1858
SAR Membership:69289
Role:Ancestor
Application Date:12 Feb 1949
Father:Joshua Whitford
Mother:Prudence Burdick
Spouse:Jabez Burdick
Children:Elizabeth Burdick
Source Citation: Volume: 347
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Original data: Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970. Louisville, Kentucky: National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. Microfilm, 508 rolls.

They had the following children.

  M i Jesse BURDICK-10430 was born on 24 Aug 1794. He died on 23 Sep 1885.

John BURDICK [Parents] [scrapbook]-15631 was born on 3 Jan 1732 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut. He died on 27 Mar 1802 in Hopkinton, Washington, Rhode Island. He was buried in Hopkinton Cemetery, Hopkinton, Washington, Rhode Island. John married Sybil CHEESEBROUGH-15632 on 23 Nov 1752 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

BURIAL: Rev John Burdick in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Name:Rev John Burdick
Birth Date:3 Jan 1732
Birth Place:Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, United States of America
Death Date:27 Mar 1802
Death Place:Hopkinton, Washington County, Rhode Island, United States of America
Cemetery:First Hopkinton Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Hopkinton, Washington County, Rhode Island, United States of America
Has Bio?:N
Children:
Prudence Stillman
William H Burdick
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.

MILITARY: John Burdick in the Connecticut Soldiers, French and Indian War, 1755-62
Given Name:John
Surname:Burdick
Page #:201
Location:Connecticut
Regiment:Second
Regt.Command:Whiting, Nathan Colonel & Captain
Company:Eighth
Co.Command:Phelps, Ichabod Captain
Campaign Year:1760
Source List:Muster Roll
Source Information: Guertin, Iris, Rose, comp. Connecticut Soldiers, French and Indian War, 1755-62 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.
Original data: Connecticut Historical Society. Rolls of Connecticut Men in the French and Indian War, 1755-1762. Vol. I-II. Hartford, CT, USA: Connecticut Historical Society, 1903-1905.

Sybil CHEESEBROUGH-15632 was born on 24 Aug 1729 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut. She died on 31 Dec 1787 in Hopkinton, Washington, Rhode Island. Sybil married John BURDICK-15631 on 23 Nov 1752 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

MARRIAGE: Sibbel Chesebrough in the Connecticut, Town Marriage Records, pre-1870 (Barbour Collection)
Name:Sibbel Chesebrough
[Sibbel Cheesebrough, Chesebro]
Marriage Date:23 Nov 1752
Marriage Place:Stonington, Connecticut, USA
Spouse:John Burdick
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Connecticut, Town Marriage Records, pre-1870 (Barbour Collection) [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.
Original data: White, Lorraine Cook, ed. The Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Vital Records. Vol. 1-55. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1994-2002.

BIRTH: Sybil Chesebrough in the Family Data Collection - Births
Name:Sybil Chesebrough
Father:James Chesebrough Chesebrough
Mother:Prudence Harris
Birth Date:24 Aug 1729
City:Stonington
County:New London
State:CT
Country:USA
Source Information: Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection - Births [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001.

They had the following children.

  M i Jabez BURDICK-10432 was born on 16 May 1755. He died on 21 Sep 1822.

Samuel STEERE [Parents] [scrapbook]-15619 was born on 13 Jan 1745 in Glocester, Providence, Rhode Island. He died on 26 Jan 1826 in Johnston, Providence, Rhode Island. He was buried in Samuel Steere Lot, Johnston, Providence, Rhode Island. Samuel married Mary SMITH-15620 on 1 Jan 1775.

Mary SMITH [scrapbook]-15620 was born on 25 Dec 1755 in Scituate, Providence, Rhode Island. She died on 25 Jul 1830 in Johnston, Providence, Rhode Island. She was buried in Samuel Steere Lot, Johnston, Providence, Rhode Island. Mary married Samuel STEERE-15619 on 1 Jan 1775.

They had the following children.

  M i Hardin STEERE-10435 was born on 15 Jan 1798. He died on 13 Jul 1847.

Abel JONES [scrapbook]-10436 was born on 7 Sep 1782 in Winchendon, Worcester, Massachusetts. He died on 25 Nov 1840 in Worcester, Worcester, Massachusetts. He was buried in Old Centre Burial Ground, Winchendon, Worcester, Massachusetts. Abel married Hannah Briant KNIGHT-26389 on 8 Nov 1806 in Winchencdon, Worcester, Massachusetts.

BIRTH: Name: Abel Jones
Gender: Male
Christening Date:
Christening Place:
Birth Date: 07 Sep 1782
Birthplace: WINCHENDON,WORCESTER,MASSACHUSETTS
Death Date:
Name Note:
Race:
Father's Name: Abel Jones
Father's Birthplace:
Father's Age:
Mother's Name: Lucinda
Mother's Birthplace:
Mother's Age:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: C50162-1
System Origin: Massachusetts-ODM
GS Film number: 0873759 IT 3
Reference ID:
Citing this Record:
"Massachusetts, Births and Christenings, 1639-1915," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VQ6F-Q4M : accessed 28 May 2015), Abel Jones, 07 Sep 1782; citing WINCHENDON,WORCESTER,MASSACHUSETTS, ; FHL microfilm 0873759 IT 3.

BURIAL: Abel Jones in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Name: Abel Jones
Death Date: 25 Nov 1840
Cemetery: Old Centre Burial Ground
Burial or Cremation Place: Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States of America
Has Bio?: N
Spouse: Hannah Jones
Children:
Harriet B Jefferson
Mary Sabine Messinger
Lucinda Heywood Fisher
Elizabeth Kidder Farnsworth
Sarah Jones
William Rawson Jones
Eveline/Emeline Hastings Burgess
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.

Hannah Briant KNIGHT [Parents] [scrapbook]-26389 was born on 3 Oct 1786 in Fitzwilliam, Chester, New Hampshire. She died on 27 Dec 1869 in Worcester County, Massachusetts. She was buried in Old Centre Burial Ground, Winchendon, Worcester, Massachusetts. Hannah married Abel JONES-10436 on 8 Nov 1806 in Winchencdon, Worcester, Massachusetts.

BURIAL: Hannah Jones in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Name: Hannah Jones
Birth Date: 3 Oct 1786
Birth Place: Fitzwilliam, Cheshire County, New Hampshire, United States of America
Death Date: 26 Dec 1869
Death Place: Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States of America
Cemetery: Old Centre Burial Ground
Burial or Cremation Place: Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States of America
Has Bio?: N
Father: William Knight
Mother: Lydia Knight
Spouse: Abel Jones
Children:
Harriet B Jefferson
Mary Sabine Messinger
Lucinda Heywood Fisher
Elizabeth Kidder Farnsworth
Sarah Jones
William Rawson Jones
Eveline/Emeline Hastings Burgess
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.

DEATH: Hannah B Jones in the Massachusetts, Death Records, 1841-1915
Name: Hannah B Jones
[Hannah B Knight]
Gender: Female
Age: 83
Birth Date: abt 1786
Birth Place: Harvard Mass
Death Date: 26 Dec 1869
Death Place: Winchendon, Massachusetts, USA
Father: Wm Knight
Mother: Lydia Knight
New England Historic Genealogical Society; Boston, Massachusetts; Massachusetts Vital Records, 1840???1911
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Death Records, 1841-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.
Original data: Massachusetts Vital Records, 1840–1911. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts.
Massachusetts Vital Records, 1911–1915. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts.

MARRAIGE: Hannah Knight in the Massachusetts, Compiled Marriages, 1633-1850
Name: Hannah Knight
Gender: Female
Spouse: Abel Jones
Marriage Date: 8 Nov 1806
City: Winchendon
County: Worchester
Source: Family History Library, Salt Lake City, UT, Film # 0873759 item 3.
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Compiled Marriages, 1633-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.
Original data: Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. Massachusetts, Marriages, 1633-1850. With some noted exceptions all marriage records in this collection can be found at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, and may be available through Family History Centers throughout the United States. See table below for information listed.


Oren Arms CURTIS [Parents] [scrapbook]-13338 was born on 23 Jun 1829 in Evertonville, Vermillion, Indiana. He died on 28 Mar 1898 in Newkirk, Kay, Oklahoma. He was buried in Curtis Family Cemetery, Shawnee County, Kansas. Oren married Helen C. PAPPAN-13339 on 1 Feb 1859.

OBITUARY: TOPEKA DAILY CAPITAL Wednesday March 30, 1898
Captain "Jack" Curtis
Captain "Jack" Curtis, the father of Congressman Charles Curtis, died suddenly last Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock at his home six miles out of Newkirk, Oklahoma Territory. Captain Jack left Topeka for Newkirk about two years ago and has since lived there with his brother. His death was very sudden and last night no word had been received by the family. He had written a letter to his daughter, Mrs Elizabeth Colvin, in the early part of the week in which he said that he and his brother were both well. At the time of Captain Curtis' death telegrams were sent to both Congressman Curtis and to the family here. The relatives in Topeka failed to receive the telegram and the first word they received of the death of Captain Curtis was at 2 o'clock yesterday morning, when a reporter for the Capital went to the Curtis home to ascertain whether or not they knew the particulars of his death. His mother did not then tell her granddaughter and she knew nothing of it until she read yesterday morning's Capital. She could scarcely credit the report and while she still had the paper in her hand, a messenger boy arrived with the delayed telegram. Congressman Curtis, upon the receipt of the news of his father's death immediately telegraphed A.A. Hurd to make arrangements for having the remains sent to Topeka. He also sent a telegram Harry Safford, asking him to arrange to receive the body. As Mr. Safford was in Denver, his wife showed the telegram to Archie Williams, who has made arrangements to care for the body upon its arrival here.
Captain Curtis was born in Vermillion county, Indiana; and lived there until 1855. when he came to Topeka. He was a participant in the border war which so aroused Eastern Kansas in the early days. He was an ardent Free State man. He has been married five times, and one of his wives, is still living, Mrs Rachel (Funk) Hatch, is still living. His first wife was Miss Isabelle Jane Quick and their son John, is now a brakeman on the Rock Island railroad. Captain Curtis was divorced from his first wife and later married Helen Pappan. From this union two children were born, Congressman Charles Curtis and Mrs Elizabeth Colvin. After his wife's death, Captain Curtis married Miss Rachel Funk, and after being divorced from her, married Miss Lucy (Lou) Jay, who was the mother of Miss Permelia (Dollie) Curtis. Captain Curtis was the eldest of fourteen children, eleven of whom are still living. Of these, Mrs Cynthia Smith, Mrs Eunice Wise and Mrs Elizabeth Brown are residents of Topeka, Kansas. Charles Curtis lives in Lawrence, Kansas and William Curtis, in California. The mother of the family is still living at the old Curtis house in North Topeka and is 91 years old. The arrangements of the funeral have not yet been made but the body will probably be interred in the Curtis Cemetery north of North Topeka. Congressman Curtis and Miss Dollie Curtis left Washington yesterday at noon and expected in Topeka on Thursday. The remains will probably arrive in the city this evening. They will be taken to the home of Congressman Curtis to await his home coming. Capt. O.A. Curtis served with Co. F 15th Kans. Cav. during the Civil War.

MEDIA: J3217 - Orem Arms Curtis Civil War Uniform h/o Helen C. Pappan Grandfather of Leona Virginai Curtis Knight - Find A Grave Memorial# 17853810

BIOGRAPHY: Orren (Oren, Oran) Arms Curtis was the oldest son of William and Permelia Hubbard Curtis.  He was born in Eugene, Vermillion County, Indiana, June 2, 1829.  At the age of twenty years, he married Isabelle Quick. They only lived together a few years and were divorced.  They had two children, Harvey and John Curtis.

After he was divorced from his first wife, he joined a circus for a season, then arrived in Topeka, Kansas, about the year 1856, and was for a time employed by the Pappans to assist in running or operating a ferry boat across the Kansas River.  About 1859 he married Helene (Helen or Ellen) Pappan, the oldest daughter of Louis and Julia Gonvil Pappan.  There were two children born of this marriage:  Charles, born January 25, 1860, and Elizabeth, born September 2, 1861.

Charles Curtis in his autobiography later wrote:  To explain my Indian heritage I will tell this.

In the years when the North American Indians ruled supreme over that part of our country known as the Louisiana Purchase, there lived west of the Mississippi River two strong and powerful tribes of Indians:  The Osages and the Kanza (Kansas or Kaw).  These tribes had their enemies among the smaller tribes of the plains, but they were dominant over their respective domains until after the Louisiana Purchase by the United States, and until the government began to make treaties with them for the relinquishment of their lands, which they held by the right of occupancy.  History does not tell us where they came from, but they were in possession and each claimed by the right of occupancy a vast domain, which by means of many a hard-fought battle with the other wild tribes of the plains, they were able to retain.  When the United States became the owner of the lands covered by the Louisiana Purchase, it took the same subject to the rights of the Indians.  The Osages occupied lands covering a large part of Kansas.  The Kansas Indians occupied lands north and west, into what is now a part of Colorado and north into the state of Nebraska, and claimed a small strip in western Missouri, covering a part of the state in and around what is now known as Independence and Kansas City. At one time, these two tribes were supposed to make up one tribe, as their language and habits are quite similar and they were always friendly, and the members intermarried, so that many families are of the blood of both tribes, but later they separated, and were separate tribes thereafter. In the early days, Pawhuska was Head Chief of the Osage Tribe of Indians.  He was known as “White Hair,” and was a strong man and a great leader of his people.  After his death, after 1825, the tribe was placed on a reservation in the old Indian Territory, and named the principal town in Osage County, Oklahoma, Pawhuska, which covers the lands formerly within the Osage Reservation. White Plume was born about 1763, and died at the age of seventy or more.  He became chief of the Kansas Nation, and was highly regarded.  He was one of the ablest and most progressive Indians of his day.  He became a warm friend to Lewis and Clark, and was of great help to them in their work among the Indians of that section of the country.  He was the first Indian Chief for whom the government built a stone house in the Territory of Kansas.  He never lived in it, however, because he preferred his wigwam.  Before he became Head Chief of the Kansas Indians, he married a daughter of Pawhuska.  Then their oldest daughter married Louis Gonvil, a Frenchman who was an Indian trader who had lived among the Indians for many years.  There were two daughters born of this marriage, Josette and Pelagie Gonvil.  After the death of his first wife, Louis Gonvil married the second daughter of White Plume, and as a result of this marriage two more daughters were born, Julia and Victorie.  These four daughters are mentioned in the Treaty between the United States and the Kansas Indians, made at the City of St. Louis in 1825.  Each was given an allotment of one mile of land on the north bank of the Kansas River.  Kaw Mile Four, upon which North Topeka, Kansas, is now located was ceded to Julia Gonvil.  Julia (sometimes found as Julie Gonville) married Louis Pappan, who had been sent to trade with the Indians by the American Fur Company.  His people originally came from the north of France to Canada, and from there they moved to St. Louis and members of the old Pappan family still live in St. Louis. After the marriage of Julia Gonvil to Louis Pappan, they built a log house on the north side of her allotment and lived there until they moved to the Kansas Reservation near Council Grove, Kansas.  There were seven children born as a result of this marriage  The eldest daughter, Helene Pappan, when old enough , was sent to St. Louis to be educated.  In 1859, Helen Pappan (also known as Ellen or Helen), was married to Orren Curtis.  As stated before, there were two children born of this marriage, Charles and Elizabeth Curtis.  This delineates the Indian ancestry and heritage of Charles Curtis.
 
A biographer of Charles Curtis wrote the following:  “I remember quite well a visit Captain Jack Curtis and wife and baby son Charles made to the old home place through the winter of 1860.  Some of the older residents of that township may remember that every morning this little Indian mother would take her babe down to the Wabash and dip him into the water, in the approved Kaw Indian custom, much to the awe of the younger generation thereabouts.  No matter how cold, if the ice could be broken, this little Charlie Curtis got his refreshing morning plunge.” To continue with the record of Orren Arms (Captain Jack) Curtis, Charles Curtis stated in his autobiography:  At the time of my birth, January 25, 1860, my parents were living in a log house, which was located near the landing of the Pappan Ferry on the north bank of the Kansas River.  My sister, Elizabeth, was born September 2, 1861.  When the great Civil War came, my father, like thousands of others, volunteered in the Union Army, and soon after his enlistment he was sent to the front.  He was soon commissioned Captain of Company F of the 15th Kansas Cavalry.  Mother, sister and I were left behind.  Mother died in 1863 of what was then known as the “Black Fever.”  We two children were taken to the home of our grandparents, William and Permelia Curtis, who then lived on a farm near the old town of Mt. Florence.  (This was described in an earlier section.) Copies of the army records of Orren A. Curtis showed he enlisted October 2, 1863 and was mustered out on April 27, 1865, having been appointed a Captain on October 4, 1863.  Another enlistment showed enrolled October 16, 1868, discharged April 18, 1869 (6 months enlistment).  He served as Quartermaster Sergeant, Company H, 19th Kansas Cavalry.

In a History of Kansas:  Shawnee County, page 559, we read some of his life activities:

O.A. Curtis, born Vermillion County, Indiana, June 1, 1829 and lived at Eugene until age 23 years. He married in Indiana 1848; had two children, Harvey and John.  In 1851 moved to Platte County, Illinois; here 3 years, returned to Indiana; farming, hotel keeping and running flat boats. From Indiana he came directly to Kansas City, Kansas, arriving April 1, 1856.  The same month walked to the Quaker Mission, but night arrived before he reached his destination and due to his Free-State sentiments could not procure shelter for the night.  In the morning, he reached the Mission where he stayed for rest, then proceeded, still on foot, towards Lawrence, where he stopped at night in the home of a friendly Indian.  He went to Ft. Leavenworth with the intention of enlisting in the regular army, but being disgusted with the way the soldiers were treated, he returned to Leavenworth City. The following day he hired out to a man at Kickapoo to break prairie.

He later worked in St. Joseph, Missouri, and afterwards worked with business firms, traveling in Missouri and Iowa.  He then went to work running ferry boats for Louis Pappan; hauled logs for Covee until April 1857.  Took a claim in Rochester -- sold out to Hiller -- started a grocery on Soldier’s Creek -- ran that for two months, sold it and ran ferry again for Pappan, February 1858.  Started a saloon and did a good business until the pontoon bridge was washed away (the link between North Topeka and Topeka).  He sold the saloon, and then re-established a ferry in company with Louis Pappan.  In February 1859, he married Ellen Pappan, who died in April 1863.  Their children were Charles and Elizabeth. He retained his charter for the ferry boat until 1865.  In August 1863, he raised a company of militia, of which he was in command a short time.  He also raised Company “F” of the 15th Kansas Cavalry, and mustered in at Leavenworth as Captain in October 1863.   His activities with the militia were varied, and took him over many areas in Kansas and Missouri.  It would seem that he led a very colorful life. Taking a leave of absence, he married, on Christmas Day, 1864, at Olathe, Kansas, Miss Lou or Lucy Jay.  They had a daughter, Dolly, born March 24, 1866, at Topeka.  She married Edward Everett Gann on December 12, 1915, and they later lived in Washington, D.C. with her half-brother, Charles Curtis, where she served as hostess to him while he served as Vice President.
 
According to the history, he had also been married to a Mrs. Hatch, from whom he was divorced, and also to Rachel Funk, and they were divorced also.  (Same person?)

He returned to Topeka, ran the ferry for one year, then in 1866 he started a dry goods store and grocery, which he ran for one year.  He commenced shipping cattle to St Louis, Missouri, in which business he remained one year.  In November, 1868, he re-enlisted with the 19th Kansas Cavalry as Quartermaster Sergeant, and mustered out in Aril 1969.  He spent the year of 1871 in Jackson County, Missouri, and then recommenced shipping cattle for 8 years, doing most of his business at St. Louis, Missouri.  He went to Nebraska to work on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. The history does not cover his activities during the later years of his life, but we find that Orren A. Curtis died suddenly in March 1898, six miles out of Newkirk, Oklahoma, where he had been living with a younger brother.  From information received, he died of heart failure.  He had been in the field cutting underbrush and came into the house at noon, where he was talking to his brother.  He was laughing heartily, when he suddenly stopped and walking to the lounge, laid down and he was dead in a moment. The body of Captain Curtis was returned to Topeka, and the funeral was held at the residence of his son, Congressman Charles Curtis, with services conducted by Rev. W. B. Hutchinson of the Baptist Church and Rev. T. E. Chandler of the Kansas Street Methodist Church.  Music was furnished by a choir.  The services were attended by a great many family members and their friends.  Interment was in the Curtis Burying Ground at the north end of Harrison Street.   (North Topeka News)
 
Congressman Charles Curtis and his sister, Miss Dollie Curtis, arrived from Washington to attend the funeral of their father.  Mr. Curtis was very deeply affected by the death of his father to whom he has always been greatly devoted.  His appearance indicates that this has been a great and unexpected blow.  (Topeka State Journal)

Captain Curtis was the oldest of fourteen children of William and Permelia Hubbard Curtis, eleven of whom are still living, as well as his mother, who still lives at the old Curtis house in North Topeka, and is 91 years old. Captain Curtis was a born rover.  He made frequent trips through the country and when last heard of he was making arrangements for a wagon trip during the coming summer through Arkansas.  (Topeka State Journal)

Taken from the history of William & Permelia Hubbard Curtis Family, compiled and prepared by Roberta Hubbard Palmer for the Charles Wesley Hubbard Organization, July 1992, from many sources researched over the years, and from two trips to Topeka, Kansas, in 1972 and 1974.   Additional resources include:

Autobiography of Charles Curtis
The Emporia Kansas Research Studies of Charles Curtis of Kansas
Kansas State Historical Society
Harold O’Donnell, “The First 100 Years of Eugene, Indiana.”
Professional researcher Irene Williams, who sent and provided all kinds of Curtis records, from Topeka, Kansas, census records, certificates, obituaries, newspaper articles, etc.
Harold J. Smith, from all kinds of family records, his letters, his taking care of the Curtis Burying Ground,
Newspaper articles.
Helen King, who made a special study of the Curtis Burying Ground, and who took me there for the pictures I took.
Jim French, newspaper columnist from Olate, Kansas.
Various correspondence from some of the descendants of Charles Curtis.

Helen C. PAPPAN [scrapbook]-13339 was born in 1840 in Shawnee County, Kansas. She died on 1 Apr 1863 in Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas. She was buried in Curtis Family Cemetery, Shawnee County, Kansas. Helen married Oren Arms CURTIS-13338 on 1 Feb 1859.

BURIAL: Name: Helen Pappan Curtis
Maiden Name: Pappan
Event Type: Burial
Event Date: 1863
Event Place: North Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas, United States of America
Photograph Included: Yes
Birth Date: 1840
Death Date: Apr 1863
Affiliate Record Identifier: 17853786
Cemetery: Curtis Family Cemetery
Citing this Record:
"Find A Grave Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QVVK-3T55 : accessed 20 January 2015), Helen Pappan Curtis, 1863; Burial, North Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas, United States of America, Curtis Family Cemetery; citing record ID 17853786, Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com.

They had the following children.

  M i Charles CURTIS-10439 was born on 25 Jan 1860. He died on 8 Feb 1936.

John Albro PLACE [Parents]-16632 was born in 1726 in Glocester, Providence, Rhode Island. He died on 26 Mar 1812 in Middle Smithfield, Monroe, Pennsylvania. John married Grace KITCHELL-16633.

Grace KITCHELL-16633 was born in 1741 in Hanover, Morris, New Jersey. She died on 7 Nov 1818 in Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio. Grace married John Albro PLACE-16632.

They had the following children.

  M i Arca PLACE-10441 was born on 14 Feb 1766. He died on 6 Jan 1827.

Titus REYNOLDS-10448 was born on 10 Dec 1770 in Nine Partners, Dutchess, New York. He died on 30 Mar 1860 in Chatham, Columbia, New York. Titus married Elizabeth BROWN-10449 in 1792.

DEATH: Titus Reynolds in the U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules, 1850-1885
Name:Titus Reynolds
Gender:Male
Marital status:Widowed
Estimated birth year:abt 1771
Birth Place:New York
Age:89
Death Date:Mar 1860
Cause of Death:dropsy
Census Year:1860
Census Place:Chatham, Columbia, New York, USA
Line:12
Source CitationL New York State Education Department, Office of Cultural Education; Albany, New York; U.S. Census Mortality Schedules, New York, 1850-1880; Archive Roll Number: M3; Census Year: 1860; Census Place: Chatham, Columbia, New York
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules, 1850-1885 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. A portion of this collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.

Elizabeth BROWN-10449 was born on 11 Oct 1770 in Chatham, Columbia, New York. She died on 29 Jul 1826 in Chatham, Columbia, New York. Elizabeth married Titus REYNOLDS-10448 in 1792.

They had the following children.

  M i Ira REYNOLDS-10446 was born on 8 Nov 1805. He died on 4 Jan 1875.

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