A Historical and Statistical Account of New-Brunswick, B.N.A. With Advice to Emigrants by The Rev. W. Christopher Atkinson, A. M.
                           A

          HISTORICAL AND STATISTICAL ACCOUNT

                          OF

          N E W - B R U N S W I C K, B. N. A.

                         WITH

                 ADVICE TO EMIGRANTS.         


                          BY

         The Rev. W. Christopher Atkinson, A.M.,              
PASTOR OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, MASCREEN, ST GEORGE'S.

      THIRD EDITION, GREATLY IMPROVED AND CORRECTED.

                     [Greek Text]
                     [Latin Text]
      Here is information, both accurate and honest!

                      * * * * *

                      EDINBURGH:
             PRINTED BY ANDERSON & BRYCE
                      * * * * *
                      MDCCCXLIV.





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              ACCOUNT OF NEW-BRUNSWICK.          79     


[previous text omitted]

   Twelve miles from Fredericton, the intervale
appears on both sides expanding to a consider-
able extent. Another road from Fredericton
strikes the Naswaak, at a considerable distance
from this place. About eighteen miles below
Frederiction, the road to Miramichi turns off
to the right, and ascending a steep hill, pur-
sues its course over a dreary portage, about
fourteen miles in extent, until it arrives within
four miles of Boistown, situated on the south-
west of Miramichi, about seventy miles from
Chatham, and forty from Fredericton. There
is a fertile track of country sufficient for 250
families. Newcastle and Chatham are the next
places of any importance. On leaving Bois-
town, which is forty-five miles from Frederic-
ton, and sixty-eight miles to Chatham, we pass
through a small village called Blissfield, in which





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80           HISTORICAL AND STATISTICAL


there is, inhabited houses, sixty-eight; families,
seventy-one; acres of cleared land, 545.
Sucession, and Wesleyan-Methodist churches --
   About three miles on this side of Newcastle,
there is a small ferry to cross (Wilson's Point.)
Newcastle is the shire town of the county,
(Northumberland) and was greatly injured by
the extensive fire of 1825, which swept off that
part of the Province -- from the effects of which,
it has never since recovered, although, as the
country above becomes more agricultural, it
must, from its position, necessarily resume its
former importance. There is a Presbyterian
church here. Inhabited houses, 404; inhabi-
tants, 433; acres of cleared land, 2000.
the least appearance of order or regularity.
   Douglas is about a mile from Newcastle, on
the road to Chatham; is seated on the north
bank of the river, and was destroyed in the ge-
neral conflagration of 1825, and has since been
rebuilt. It contains stores and tradesmen's
shops. Messrs Gilmour & Rankine carry on
an extensive business here. The most conspi-
cuous building in this place, is a fine edifice for
a marine hospital.
   About five miles from Douglas, is Chatham
which is situated on the south side of the river.
At the east of this village, is a Presbyterian
church, dedicated to St Andrew, a small but neat





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              ACCOUNT OF NEW-BRUNSWICK.          81


edifice, surmounted by a spire, with an inserted
belfrey. There is also an Episcopal, Catholic, 
Sucession, and Wesleyan-Methodist churches --
the latter will contain five hundred and fifty
persons. The building is neat, and well ar-
ranged, and has a fine portico, embellished with
Grecian pillars, which inclose a double vesti-
bule. At this place, the Messrs Cunards have
a very large steam, saw, and grist mill estab-
lishment. There is a post-office, reading-room,
and printing office, which issues a newspaper
every Tuesday, called "The Gleaner." The 
village is exceedingly ill laid out, both for ele-
gance and convenience. The buildings stand
along both sides a very crooked road, without
the least appearance of order or regularity.

   The river abounds with fish, particularly
shad and salmon. It is about a mile broad, but
contracts towards Newcastle, where its breadth
does not exceed half a-mile; yet, notwithstand-
ing its narrowness, the waters are brackish
above these places. The current of the Mira-
michi is less rapid than that of the St Law-
rence, and the tide rises in a less degree, but,
with an easterly gale, it sometimes rises twelve
or fifteen feet. Inhabited houses here are 441;
families, 582; acres of cleared land, 3660.

   There is an Episcopal church; also a Scotch





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82           HISTORICAL AND STATISTICAL

church. There is likewise a Secession, a Wes-
leyan-Metodist, and a Catholic chapel -- each
of which is supplied with a minister. Oppo-
site Newcastle, Alexander Fraser, Esq. has a
compact steam saw-mill establishment.

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