A Historical and Statistical Account of New-Brunswick, B.N.A. With Advice to Emigrants by The Rev. W. Christopher Atkinson, A. M.





                          SKETCHES
                             OF
                       NEW-BRUNSWICK;
                         CONTAINING
             AN ACCOUNT OF THE FIRST SETTLEMENT
                      OF THE PROVINCE,
                            WITH
                     A BRIEF DESCRIPTION
                           OF THE
  COUNTRY, CLIMATE, PRODUCTIONS, INHABITANTS, GOVERNMENT,
     RIVERS, TOWNS, SETTLEMENTS, PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS,
               TRADE, REVENUE, POPULATION &C.

                            ----

                             BY
                 An Inhabitant of the Province.

                            ----

        "Whatever concerns my country, interests me;
            I follow nature, with truth my guide."

                           ======

                         SAINT JOHN:
                  PRINTED BY CHUBB & SEARS,
                        MARKET-SQUARE.

                            ----

                            1825.





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                             27




                       RIVER MIRAMICHI.

  This is one of the finest rivers for lumber in the Province.
Its banks, as well as the banks of the numberous streams that
fall into it, are covered with pines of the finest growth, which
appear to be almost inexhaustable, for although lumbering has
been prosecuted on this river to a great extent for a number of
years past, there is still abundance found by going a little back
from the water. It is indeed the main source of the trade of the
large County of Northumberland. One hundred and forty-one
thousand three hundred and eighty-four tons of timber were
shipped at the port of Miramichi in 1821. Rafts are taken
down this river with the greatest safety to the shipping, which
load at different places from the mouth of the river up to Fras-
ser's Island. It has two main branches called the north-west
and south-west, which run a great way into the country, and
with their numerous streams lay open the inmost recesses of this
extensive County. Several fine islands lay in the course of
this river, covered with elm, ash, butternut, &c. which invari-
ably denote the most luxurious soil. Its waters are well stored
with excellent salmon and other fish, which are caught here in
great abundance. There are several settlements along this ri-
ver, none of which merit a particular description, the improve-
ment of the country being neglected for lumbering. The
branches of this river approach in several places very near to
streams falling into the river St. John, which communicate by
short portages. As I have never been able to procure correct
information about the sources of this river or its length, I have
not the means of satisfying the reader on these points, but must
dismiss the subject with these few particulars, being all I could
obtain.





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