Mary Elizabeth Bardóenes

F, (11 July 1837 - 28 February 1903)
Ancestry Unknown* The name and ancestry of this person's husband are unknown. If you can help in the identification of her husband or his parents or provide other genealogical information about this family, please contact Warren Culpepper, using the link at the bottom of this page. 
Birth*11 July 1837 Mary was born at Sonora, Mexico, on 11 July 1837.1 
Marriage*14 December 1853 She married Joseph Edward Hough at San Francisco, San Francisco Co., California, on 14 December 1853 at age 16. 
Married Name14 December 1853  As of 14 December 1853, her married name was Hough. 
Married Name14 December 1853  As of 14 December 1853, her married name was Howe. 
(household member) 1860 Census1 June 1860 Mary, Mary, Joseph and John listed as a household member living with Joseph Edward Hough in the 1860 Census at Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., California.2 
(Family Member) Relocationbetween 1860 and 1864 She, as a family member, accompanied Joseph Edward Hough in relocating between 1860 and 1864 at Alabama 
(household member) 1870 Census1 June 1870 Mary, Mary, Joseph, John, George, Victoria and Louis was listed as a household member living with Joseph Edward Hough on the 1870 Census at Bughall, Bullock Co., Alabama.3 
(Family Member) Relocationcirca 1874 She, as a family member, accompanied Joseph Edward Hough in relocating circa 1874 at Santa Rosa Co., Florida
(Wife) 1880 Census1 June 1880 Mary was listed as Joseph Edward Hough's wife on the 1880 Census at Santa Rosa Co., Florida.4 
(Wife) Census1 June 1885 She was listed as a wife in the census report at Santa Rosa Co., Florida, on 1 June 1885.5 
(Mother-in-law) 1900 Census1 June 1900 Mary was listed as a mother-in-law in Daniel M. Grey's household on the 1900 Census at Bagdad, Santa Rosa Co., Florida.6 
Death*28 February 1903 She died at Bagdad, Santa Rosa Co., Florida, on 28 February 1903 at age 65.1 
Burial*circa 1 March 1903 Her body was interred circa 1 March 1903 at Bagdad Cemetery, Bagdad, Santa Rosa Co., Florida.7 

Family

Joseph Edward Hough (25 December 1821 - 18 July 1885)
Children
Last Edited19 June 2008

Citations

  1. Harry Stuart Culpepper and Alma Elaine Payne Ancestors, Culpepper/Payne Family Bible, Steven Edward Culpepper, owner, Sandy Springs, GA, (2005).
  2. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 99, Sheet 391, Family 969, Ancestry.com Img 147, Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA
    Joseph E. Howe, 38, M, Farmer, SC
    Eliza Howe, 24, F, Mexico
    Mary E. Howe, 5, F, CA
    Joseph Howe, 3, M, CA
    John Howe, 5/12, M, CA.
  3. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Bughall, Bullock Co., AL, Ancestry.com image #2 transcribed by Warren Culpepper
    Joseph Hough, 48, Baker, R=$200, NC, father foreign born
    Mary Hough, 33, Kpg House, Mexico, both parents foreign born
    Hester Hough, 15, F, CA
    Joseph Hough, 13, M, CA
    John Hough, 10, F [sic], CA
    George Hough, 6, M, AL
    Victoria E. Hough, 3, F, AL
    Louis Phillippe Hough, 6/12, M, AL.
  4. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 136, page 28, sheet 170D, Ancestry.com img 28, Precinct 1, Santa Rosa Co., FL
    Joseph E. Howe, HH, 57, Confectioner, SC, SC, SC
    Mary E. Howe, Wife, 45, Kpg House, MX, MX, MX
    Joseph R. Howe, Son, Single, 22, CA, SC, MX
    George W. Howe, Son, 16, AL, SC, MX
    Manuel Howe, Son, 13, AL, SC, MX
    Charles W. Howe, Son, 8, AL, SC, MX
    Rosa I. Howe, Dau, 5, FL, SC, MX
    Mary Thompson, Dau, F, Wid, 25, CA, SC, MX
    Russell Thompson, Son, 2, FL, FL, CA.
  5. Ancestry.com, compiler, Florida State Census, 1867-1945, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2008.
    http://content.ancestry.com/iexec/?dbid=1506&htx=List&ti=0
    ED 122, Page 62, Lines 39-44, Santa Rosa Co., FL
    Jos. E. Hough, Head, Wh, M, 68, md, SC/SC/SC, Laborer
    Liza Hough, Wife, Wh, F, 48, md, Mex/Mex/Mex
    Geo. W. Hough, Son Wh, M, 20, sng, AL/SC/Mex
    Emanuel Hough, Son Wh, M, 17, sng, AL/SC/Mex
    Charles Hough, Son Wh, M, 11, sng, AL/SC/Mex
    Rosa Hough, Dau, Wh, F, 10, sng, FL/SC/Mex.
  6. 1900 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 108, Bagdad, Santa Rosa Co., FL, Family 219
    D. M. Gray, HH, Jul 1872, 27, Md 4 yrs, AL, NC, NC, Saw Mill Owner
    Rosa Gray, Wife, Jan 1875, 25, Md 4 yrs, 2/2 ch, FL, AL, MX
    Vivian Gray, Dau, Oct 1897, 2, Sng, FL, AL, FL
    Marie Gray, Dau, Nov 1898, 1, Sng, FL, AL, FL
    Mary Howe, Mother-in-law, Jan 1835, 65, Wid, MX, Spain, Spain.
  7. Richard Earl Jernigan, Santa Rosa Co., FL Cemeteries, West FL Genealogical Society, Pensacola, 1987.
    Bagdad Cemetery, Section 5, page 24, "In lovng memory of Mary E. Bardoenes, wife of Jos. Hough, 'The fairest lilies droop at even tide. The sweetest roses fall from off their stems. The rarest things on earth cannot abide and we are passing away too away like them', Born in Sonora, died in Mobile, AL. Aged 67 years."

William Isaac Payne

M, (1755 - 1818)
FatherSamuel Payne (s 1733 - )
Birth*1755 William was born in 1755. (Within this family tree, William Isaac Payne is shown as being born in 1755, the son of Samuel Payne. However, according to Paul Grant, "William was born near Richmond, VA 1740, the second son of John Reuben Richmond Payne (born 1700) and Nancy Mason Wilson Payne. John Reuben Richmond Payne left Birmingham, England and came to America in about 1717 and married 15 year old Nancy in 1737. They had 7 sons and 6 daughters, but Nancy died young. John Reuben then remarried to Fredicia Lewellyen in 1760, and they had 7 daughters and 2 sons." William reportedly grew up near Richmond, VA, and supposedly received a land grant in Georgia for Revolutionary War service. Thus he moved to Georgia. (Ball's History of Clarke Co., AL, pp. 330-331) This William Payne should not be confused with the Revolutionary War soldier, born 1763 in Kershaw District, SC, who married Sarah Swilley, and died in Marengo Co., AL. 
Marriage*circa 1785 He married Mary Abigail Swint at Columbia Co., Georgia, circa 1785.1 
Tax roll*1808 William I. Payne paid taxes in Columbia Co., GA on two hundred thirty acres of land on Sweetwater and for his seven slaves. His son-in-law, Andrew Smith, lived nearby and paid taxes for one slave and a riding chair in 1808. 
Relocation*between 1808 and 1815 He relocated between 1808 and 1815 at Twiggs Co., Georgia
Death*1818 He died at Twiggs Co., Georgia, in 1818
The date and place of death are assumed from the fact that in the 1818 tax digest for Capt. Hodge's district in Twiggs Co., GA, Dan'l Payne is shown as the Adm. for Wm. Payne. Also, the 1820 Lottery, shows from the Hodges district in Twiggs Co, Daniel Payne and Mary Payne (wid).2 

Family

Mary Abigail Swint (1768 - 29 August 1852)
Children
Last Edited26 January 2017

Citations

  1. Https://familysearch.org/tree/person/KP9S-Q3K/details?parents=MGTZ-QZJ_LCTN-MBH.
  2. Bess Vaughn Clark, Twiggs County, Georgia, Abstracts -- Records of a Burned County, 1987.
    pages 3 and 29.

Mary Abigail Swint

F, (1768 - 29 August 1852)
FatherJohannes Schwindt (17 Jan 1718 - 23 May 1785)
MotherElizabeth Anna Hauert1 (s 1720 - 1780)
Research note* Mary Abigail was a sister of John Swint, a Revolutionary War soldier who died about 1801 in Hancock Co., GA. They were living together in the Keg Creek area of Richmond Co., GA (later Columbia Co., GA) when she married in 1785. If you can identify the parents, of Mary and John, please contact Warren Culpepper.2,3 
Birth*1768 Mary was born at Wales in 1768.4,5 
Marriage*circa 1785 She married William Isaac Payne at Columbia Co., Georgia, circa 1785.5 
Married Namecirca 1785  As of circa 1785, her married name was Payne. 
(Family Member) Relocationbetween 1808 and 1815 She was an accompanying familiy member in the relocation of William Isaac Payne between 1808 and 1815 at Twiggs Co., Georgia
(Family Member) Relocation14 January 1819 "On the evening of the 14 Jan 1819, the peace of the happy forest of oaks was disburbed by a train of emigrants" and the Paynes were listed among the first settlers to arrive (in what was soon to become Butler Co., AL). In Ball's History of Clarke County, AL (pp. 330-331), there is the assertion that "William Isaac Payne and Mary Abigail Shouse [sic] (from Twiggs Co., GA) joined the Coleman Caravan in Dalton, GA in 1817 and moved west to Lowndes Co., AL." Actually, William Sr. died in Twiggs Co. in 1818, and the William cited must have been his son William Jr. who moved with his brothers and their Mother. Also, the 1817 date seems premature based on the date of death of William Sr in Twiggs Co.6 
Death*29 August 1852 She died at Sandy Ridge, Lowndes Co., Alabama, on 29 August 1852.4,5 
Burial*circa 30 August 1852 Her body was interred circa 30 August 1852 at Payne Cemetery, Sandy Ridge, Lowndes Co., Alabama. She is believed to have been the first person buried here..4 

Family

William Isaac Payne (1755 - 1818)
Children
Last Edited26 January 2017

Citations

  1. Https://familysearch.org/tree/person/LCTN-MBH/details?spouse=MGTZ-QZJ.
  2. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  3. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
  4. Cheryl H. Harrell, compiler, e-mail address, Payne Cemetery, Sandy Ridge, Lowndes Co., AL, Rootsweb: USGenWeb Archives, Jan 1998.
    http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/al/lowndes/cemeteries/payne.txt
    Tombstone: "Mary A. Payne, Died 29 Aug 1852, aged 84 years."
  5. Https://familysearch.org/tree/person/KP9S-Q3K/details?parents=MGTZ-QZJ_LCTN-MBH.
  6. J. B. Little, History of Butler Co., AL, .
    pg. 79.

John Jackson Payne1

M, (4 August 1798 - between 1870 and 1880)
FatherWilliam Isaac Payne (1755 - 1818)
MotherMary Abigail Swint (1768 - 29 Aug 1852)
Name Variation He was also known as Jack. 
Birth*4 August 1798 John was born at Columbia Co., Georgia, on 4 August 1798.2 
(Family Member) Relocationbetween 1808 and 1815 He was an accompanying familiy member in the relocation of William Isaac Payne between 1808 and 1815 at Twiggs Co., Georgia
Deed*September 1818 He was granted a deed in September 1818 at Butler Co., Alabama,

Records from the Cahaba Land Co. Receivers Office in Milledgeville, GA, (Book 300) show John and Samuel Payne of Twiggs Co. bought land at Sec 3, Tsp 10, Rng 14. At the same time William Payne from Twiggs Co., GA bought land in Butler Co., AL, Sec 26, Tsp 11, Rng 14.3,4 
Relocation*14 January 1819 "On the evening of the 14 Jan 1819, the peace of the happy forest of oaks was disburbed by a train of emigrants" and the Paynes were listed among the first settlers to arrive (in what was soon to become Butler Co., AL). In Ball's History of Clarke County, AL (pp. 330-331), there is the assertion that "William Isaac Payne and Mary Abigail Shouse [sic] (from Twiggs Co., GA) joined the Coleman Caravan in Dalton, GA in 1817 and moved west to Lowndes Co., AL." Actually, William Sr. died in Twiggs Co. in 1818, and the William cited must have been his son William Jr. who moved with his brothers and their Mother. Also, the 1817 date seems premature based on the date of death of William Sr in Twiggs Co.5 
Voted*1 August 1820 Butler Co., AL was created 13 Dec 1819 and the first election was held in Aug 1820. Included on the list of voters were three of the sons of William Payne: Samuel, Daniel and John.6 
Marriage*20 September 1820 He married Mary Frances Gafford at Butler Co., Alabama, on 20 September 1820 at age 22.7 
1830 Census*1 June 1830 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1830 Census at Butler Co., Alabama. (John Payne, 1M0-4, 1M5-10, 1M30-39, 1F0-4, 1F20-29).8 
Letter at PO*1 July 1835 He had a letter at the Post Office on 1 July 1835 at Greenville, Butler Co., Alabama.9 
1840 Census*1 June 1840 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1840 Census on 1 June 1840 at Butler Co., Alabama.
((1M0-4, 1M10-14, 1M15-19, 1M20-29, 1M30-39, 2F0-4, 1F5-9, 2F10-14, 1F30-39, (MSlv0-9, 1MSlv24-34, 2MSlv35-54, 6FSlv0-9, 2FSlv10-23, 5FSlv24-34; 36 total, 12 in Agriculture)).10 
1850 Census*1 June 1850 John was listed as the head of a family (John Payne, 53, M, GA, Farmer, $2500) on the 1850 Census at Butler Co., Alabama.11 
Tax roll*1856 He registered to pay taxes at Butler Co., Alabama, in 1856.12 
1860 Census*1 June 1860 John was listed as the head of a family (John Payne, 60, M, GA, Planter, RE=12,250, PE=11,350) on the 1860 Census at Butler Co., Alabama.13 
1870 Census*1 June 1870 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Greenville, Butler Co., Alabama.14 
Death*between 1870 and 1880 He died at Butler Co., Alabama, between 1870 and 1880. 
Descendant* See footnote for the name and contact info of a descendant of John Jackson Payne who would like to communicate with other descendants.15 

Family

Mary Frances Gafford (20 September 1806 - 12 June 1881)
Children
Last Edited31 January 2011

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2000 to Warren Culpepper from Paul J. Grant (#44472), e-mail address.
  2. Marilyn Davis Hahn, Butler County, Alabama in the 19th Century, 1978.
    p. 64. Cemetery Records of People born before 1850. John Payne, b 4 Aug 1798, d (blank). Cemetery #31.
  3. Marilyn Davis Hahn, Old Cahaba Land Office Records and Military Warrants, 1817-1853, Southern University Press, Birmingham, AL 1986.
    Page 4.
  4. George Bernard Lewis: Chairman of the Butler Co. Heritage Book Committee, editor, The Heritage of Butler County, Alabama, Clanton, AL: Heritage Publishing Consultants, 2003.
    Pages 3-4: "Early Landowners of Butler County," from the Butler County Tract Book showing the first owners of land in the county:
    1817: ..., Daniel Gafford, Jeremiah Gafford, ...
    1818: ..., Grant Gafford (Assignee), James Gafford (Assignee), ...
    1819: ..., John Payne (Assignee), ...
  5. J. B. Little, History of Butler Co., AL, .
    pg. 79.
  6. Marilyn Davis Hahn, Butler County, Alabama in the 19th Century, 1978.
    p. 22.
  7. Marilyn Davis Hahn, Butler County, Alabama in the 19th Century, 1978.
    Early County Marriages, p. 109 (John Jackson Payne and Mary Frances Gafford, 20 Sep 1820).
  8. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Butler Co., AL, page 287, Ancestry.com images 11-12.
  9. Marilyn Davis Hahn, Butler County, Alabama in the 19th Century, 1978.
    p. 25-26.
  10. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Butler Co., AL, page 133, ancestry.com image transcribed by Warren Culpepper.
  11. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Butler Co., AL, Beat 1, page 181, lines 21-30. Ancestry.com image transcribed by Warren Culpepper.
  12. Marilyn Davis Hahn, Butler County, Alabama in the 19th Century, 1978.
    Real Estate Taxes for 1856, p. 172.
  13. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Butler Co., AL, Precinct 12, page 281, Ancestry.com image transcribed by Warren Culpepper.
  14. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 380B, Family 322, Township 10, Greenville, Butler Co., AL
    John Payne, 71, M, Farmer, RE=$5000, PE=$500, GA
    Francis Payne, 64, F, Keeping House, GA
    Nancy Payne, 35, F, Keeping House, RE=$1500, AL
    Dorothy Payne, 28, F, Keeping House, RE=$900, AL
    Thomas Payne, 24, M, Farmer, RE=$3500, PE=$400, AL
    John Swint (or Swink), 13, M, Laborer, AL.
  15. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.

Mary Frances Gafford

F, (20 September 1806 - 12 June 1881)
FatherDaniel Gafford (15 Jun 1780 - 10 Jun 1841)
MotherPhereba Webster (24 Dec 1788 - 24 May 1860)
Name Variation She was also known as Fannie. 
Birth*20 September 1806 Mary was born at Georgia on 20 September 1806.1,2 
Marriage*20 September 1820 She married John Jackson Payne at Butler Co., Alabama, on 20 September 1820 at age 14.3 
Married Name20 September 1820  As of 20 September 1820, her married name was Payne. 
(free wh female 20-30) 1830 Census1 June 1830 Mary was probably a free white female, age 20 and under 30, in John Jackson Payne's household, on the 1830 Census at Butler Co., Alabama.4 
(free wh female 30-40) 1840 Census1 June 1840 Mary was probably a free white female, age 30 and under 40, in John Jackson Payne's household, on the 1840 Census at Butler Co., Alabama.5 
(Household member) 1850 Census1 June 1850 Mary, Eugenia, Samuel, Nancy, Dorothy, John, Ira, Thomas and Alabama was listed as a household member (Frances Payne, 44, F, GA) living with John Jackson Payne on the 1850 Census at Butler Co., Alabama.6 
(household member) 1860 Census1 June 1860 Mary, Nancy, Dorothy, John, Ira, Thomas and Alabama was listed as a household member (Francis G. PAyne, 54, F, GA) living with John Jackson Payne in the 1860 Census at Butler Co., Alabama.7 
(household member) 1870 Census1 June 1870 Mary, Nancy, Dorothy and Thomas listed as a household member living with John Jackson Payne on the 1870 Census at Greenville, Butler Co., Alabama.8 
(spouse) Deathbetween 1870 and 1880 Mary became a widower upon the death of his wife John Jackson Payne at Butler Co., Alabama, between 1870 and 1880. 
1880 Census*1 June 1880 Mary was listed as the head of a family (Fannie G. Payne, F, Wd, Wh, 74, GA, GA, GA, Keeping House) on the 1880 Census at Greenville, Butler Co., Alabama.9 
Death*12 June 1881 She died at Greenville, Butler Co., Alabama, on 12 June 1881 at age 74.10,2 

Family

John Jackson Payne (4 August 1798 - between 1870 and 1880)
Children
Last Edited30 September 2002

Citations

  1. Joseph W. Watson, Abstracts of early records of Nash county, North Carolina 1777-1859, Rocky Mount, NC: Dixie Letter Service, 1963.
  2. Marilyn Davis Hahn, Butler County, Alabama in the 19th Century, 1978.
    p. 64. Cemetery Records of People born before 1850. Frances G. Payne, wife of Jackson, 20 Sep 1806 - 12 Jun 1881.
  3. Marilyn Davis Hahn, Butler County, Alabama in the 19th Century, 1978.
    Early County Marriages, p. 109 (John Jackson Payne and Mary Frances Gafford, 20 Sep 1820).
  4. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Butler Co., AL, page 287, Ancestry.com images 11-12.
  5. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Butler Co., AL, page 133, ancestry.com image transcribed by Warren Culpepper.
  6. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Butler Co., AL, Beat 1, page 181, lines 21-30. Ancestry.com image transcribed by Warren Culpepper.
  7. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Butler Co., AL, Precinct 12, page 281, Ancestry.com image transcribed by Warren Culpepper.
  8. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 380B, Family 322, Township 10, Greenville, Butler Co., AL
    John Payne, 71, M, Farmer, RE=$5000, PE=$500, GA
    Francis Payne, 64, F, Keeping House, GA
    Nancy Payne, 35, F, Keeping House, RE=$1500, AL
    Dorothy Payne, 28, F, Keeping House, RE=$900, AL
    Thomas Payne, 24, M, Farmer, RE=$3500, PE=$400, AL
    John Swint (or Swink), 13, M, Laborer, AL.
  9. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    Greenville, Butler Co., AL, Page 316B. LDS CD.
  10. Butler County Obituaries, 1985.

Sylvester R. Otis

M, (27 January 1810 - 14 June 1893)
FatherJacob Otis Jr.1 (1795 - 11 Jul 1856)
Birth*27 January 1810 Sylvester was born at Rhode Island on 27 January 1810. Susan N. Cline wrote
     "There was no record of his birth in Rhode Island, or any surrounding states. I am confident that he was born in Rhode Island, however, because the 1860 and 1870 Federal Census state his place of birth to be Rhode Island. Interestingly, the 1880 Federal Census states his place of birth to be Connecticut. I am sure this an error made by the informant who was probably his wife, Martha Ann Hillard, at the time.
     "On the 1885 Florida State Census , Sylvester R. Otis reports that his father was born in Rhode Island. This is the first correctly reported place of birth for his parents.      "Going on the assumption that the birthplace of his father was Rhode Island, we examine the 1820 Federal Census of Otis families in Rhode Island, we find only one candidate for Sylvester's father - and that would be Jacob Otis, Jr. who lists himself, wife, and male child between the age of 10-15. This would be correct for Sylvester, who was 10 at the time of the census.
     "There is no reference to Sylvester's mother in any records I examined. Sylvester was born in 1810 and I find it odd that his birth record is not recorded in the Rhode Island Births and Christening records."1,2,3,4 
(free wh male 10-16) 1820 Census7 August 1820 Sylvester was probably a free white male, age 10 and under 16, in an unknown person 's household, on the 1820 Census at Providence, Providence Co., Rhode Island.5 
Relocation*between 1826 and 1836 He relocated sometime between 1826 and 1836 to Alabama or Florida. It is not known why this young man from Rhode Island would relocate to the south, but there was probably no family connection holding him in Rhode Island. Sylvester's father, Jacob, was only 15 when Sylvester was born. In 1820, Jacob declared bankruptcy, and in 1828, when Sylvester would have been 18, Jacob was deemed a "drunkard" and placed in an asylum. Jacob is also shown living in an asylum for paupers in 1850. Nothing is known about Sylvester's mother. Jacob's father, Dr. Jacob Otis, relocated from Rhode Island to Orange Co., NY in 1835 at age 77 to live with a married daughter who had relocated there. The combination of the move of Sylvester's aunt and grandfather, coupled with the shame over a drunkard father, may well have been the motivation for Sylvester to seek his fortune elsewhere.6 
Marriage*say 1836 He married Malinda (?) say 1836. Their date of marriage is estimated based on the fact that their first known child was born in 1837. 
Indian Wars*1836 He served as an officer in one of the Creek and Seminole Indian Wars in 1836
(Sylvester R. Otis was a Third Lieutenant in Captain Irvin's Company, 8th Regiment, Florida Militia, Florida War (against the Seminole Indians). Congress had promised to give sailors and soldiers land in leu of or in addition to pay. Sylvester R. Otis subsequently applied for and got in 1859 his 80 acres along the Old Spanish Trail, about 5 miles north of Allentown.)2 
1840 Census*1 June 1840 Sylvester was listed as the head of a family on the 1840 Census on 1 June 1840 at Pike Co., Alabama.7 
Relocationbetween 1843 and 1848 He relocated sometime between 1843 and 1848 at Bagdad, Santa Rosa Co., Florida. Bagdad had a large lumber mill for virgin pine heart wood, and ship-building was also an important activity. It is not hard to imagine how someone from Rhode Island, with its ship-building history, might have ended up in Bagdad. But why he first was in southeastern Alabama, far from the coast, is not clear. However, the Conecuh River is navigable from Pike County in Alabama down to Florida where its name changes to the Escambia River and then flows into Escambia Bay which connects with Blackwater Bay and Bagdad. Perhaps while he lived in Pike County, Sylvester was involved in harvesting lumber that was then floated down the waterway to the lumber mill and shipyard in Bagdad.6 
Deed*7 February 1848 He granted a deed to Edwin Houston Otis on 7 February 1848 at Santa Rosa Co., Florida,

Book A, Page 87. Sylvester R. Otis to his son Edwin Houston Otis, SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of the SW 1/4, Sec 34, Twp 2, Rage 28 N&W, about 10 acres, Wit: John Chairs, R. H. Mayo; recorded 22 Nov 1869.8 
Land Grant/Patent*10 August 1850 Land was granted to Sylvester R. Otis on 10 August 1850 at Santa Rosa Co., Florida:
Patent for 40 acres of land [W½NW, Sec 35, Twp 2-N, Range 28-W], located just north and east of the present Milton High School. He later purchased a half-acre lot with a school house on it.2,9 
Deed12 October 1850 He was granted a deed on 12 October 1850 at Santa Rosa Co., Florida,

Book A, pages 85-86; Sherriff J. R. Mims grants to Sylvester R. Otis at auction at the court house door land on Escambia Road near Milton.8 
Land Grant/Patent1 June 1859 New land was granted as a patent to Sylvester R. Otis on 1 June 1859 at Santa Rosa Co., Florida,

Land patent for 80.2 acres at W½NW, Sec 35, Twp 2-N, Range 28-W.10 
1860 Census*1 June 1860 Sylvester was listed as the head of a family on the 1860 Census at Milton, Santa Rosa Co., Florida.3 
Census*1867 A census listed Sylvester as head of household at Santa Rosa Co., Florida, in 1867.11 
Marriagesay 1869 He married Jane (?) say 1869. 
1870 Census*1 June 1870 Sylvester was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Milton, Santa Rosa Co., Florida.4 
Marriage*10 January 1871 He married Martha Ann Hilliard at Santa Rosa Co., Florida, on 10 January 1871 at age 60.12 
Deed31 January 1872 He granted a deed to Edwin Houston Otis on 31 January 1872 at Santa Rosa Co., Florida,

Book A, page 495, Sylvester R. Otis to Edwin H. Otis, 40 acres in 35-2N-28.8 
1880 Census*1 June 1880 Sylvester was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Santa Rosa Co., Florida.13 
Census1 June 1885 A census listed Sylvester as head of household at Santa Rosa Co., Florida, on 1 June 1885.14 
Death*14 June 1893 He died at Santa Rosa Co., Florida, on 14 June 1893 at age 83.2 
Burial*after 14 June 1893 His body was interred after 14 June 1893 at Milton Cemetery, Milton, Santa Rosa Co., Florida.2 
Research note Bagdad Village Timeline
     Joseph Forsyth named the town, in 1842, Bagdad, after the Middle East renaissance city called Baghdad. The lumber mills of Bagdad, Florida, cut virgin Blackwater Swamp cypress and long leaf heart pine timber, which was shipped to ports in Europe, South America, Cuba and the East coast of the United States. The precious virgin timber logs just kept floating down the river as lumber jacks cut the trees and sent them South down the creeks and rivers of the Blackwater River watershed. This prized commodity made Bagdad the Prince of Wood. During the Civil War, Bagdad lost most of the mill buildings and dry docks but after the war, they were rebuilt and she quickly regained the fame and glory of delivering priceless lumber worldwide.
     At the end of the 19th Century, Bagdad was comparable to Pensacola in commerce and its main company, the E. E. Simpson and Company lumber mill, was the largest exporter and the largest company in the State of Florida. Santa Rosa County became the center of commerce for the state, but as the amount of lumber slowly decreased so did business. In 1929, the Press Gazette published an article stating, “There is at least 100 years of lumber left.” Ten years later it was all gone.
     In 1939 the last lumber mill in Bagdad closed. In 1941 World War II began and shortly thereafter most families had either moved north into Alabama or south into Pensacola looking for work. During its prime, the town had around 60 different businesses, many churches and a good school, but 1939 marked the end of Bagdad’s renaissance. Almost all the businesses were related directly or indirectly to lumber, so when the logs stopped coming down the river, narcosis began.
     A deep sleep fell on the little town. Pensacola & Milton took up the mantle of growth. Both had diversified into many industries other than lumber, such as agriculture, shipping, and military exploits. Bagdad, the once center of opportunity, began a slow arduous decline going from disregard to decay to almost oblivion followed by being simply forgotten by most people.
     Then came growth not only to South Santa Rosa County via Navarre and Gulf Breeze, but also growth in Pace and Milton. The increase is most apparent in residential construction with the advent of many housing developments creating an atmosphere associated with “bedroom towns.” Many people looked to Santa Rosa County as a place to live and raise their children but preferred to work in Escambia or Okaloosa Counties, hence, the term “bedroom towns.”
     Much should be said for a few visionary people who have realized Bagdad’s historical value. It processes a very important era of not just Florida or Santa Rosa County history but also American history. After all, much of the lumber produced by the Bagdad lumber mills were shipped to ports in Europe, South America, Cuba and the East coast of the USA creating, next to cotton, the country’s most precious exported commodity. A very valuable slice of our past lies in the soil of Bagdad.
     The Spirit of the past both, post-bellum and antebellum, is again rising. Through the efforts of dedicated people like the Bagdad Village Preservation Association and other faithful residents, the world again is noticing the beautiful lady. For example, in 2003, 16 reporters came to Bagdad to do articles and 4 were from European nations. Events in 2003 like the Blackwater Heritage Tour, the Beaches to Woodlands Tour, and the much publicized Civil War writings on the wall of the Thompson House are just a few of the many venues directing people back to the past, back to the Prince of Wood, back to Bagdad.
     One need only walk the main street, called Forsyth after the founder of Bagdad, John Forsyth, and the shore of the Blackwater River to sense the past. From a Greek Revival plantation home built in 1842, to reproductions just finished, from 1880 restored homes, the smell of the smoke stack, the sound of the steam engine, the blowing of the ships fog horn, the rubble of the horse drawn wagons, and the whistle of the train attacks the senses like sweet dreams. Now on the National Historical Directory, the once sleepy village is primed for an even greater future than her majestic past.15 
Research note For additional details on Bagdad's early lumber and shipbuilding businesses, see History of Santa Rosa County, A King's County, by M. Luther King. Two chapters are of particular significance:
Bagdad's Background at http://www.friendsofpacelibrary.org/History/King%20History/Bagdad.htm, and
Water Transportation at http://www.friendsofpacelibrary.org/History/King%20History/Water%20Transportation.htm

Family 1

Malinda (?) (1804 - 1868)
Children

Family 2

Martha Ann Gill (July 1831 - 16 April 1906)
Child
Last Edited1 January 2012

Citations

  1. Sylvester Otis Lineage, Susan N. Cline, Cline Research Services, 13 Hoxsie Road, West Kingston, RI 02892; e-mail address, to Warren Culpepper, 10 Nov 2011.
  2. Simeon Otis Report, Edie Geiger, 4621 Geiger Road, Milton, FL 32583, to Warren Culpepper, 1999.
  3. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Milton, Santa Rosa Co., FL, Family #244. Ancestry.com image
    S. R. Otis, 57, M, W, Ship Corker, RE=100, PE=100, RI
    Malind Otis, 47, F, W, GA
    E. H. Otis, 23 M, W, Engineer, RE=500, PE=200, FL
    S. R. Otis, 16, M, W, Laborer, AL.
  4. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Milton, Santra Rosa Co., FL, Family #108, Ancestry.com image 14
    S. R. Otis, 57, M, W, Mechanic, RI
    Jane Otis, 40, F, W, Keeps House, AL [2nd wife].
  5. 1820 Federal Census, United States.
    Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, Page: 159; NARA Roll: M33_117; Image: 136, enumerated 7 Aug 1820
    Jacob Otis Junior, 1M10-15, 1M16-25, 1F16-25.
  6. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
  7. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Unk Twp, Pike Co., AL, Page 372. Ancestry.com image 25
    Sylvester R. Otis, 1M0-4, 1M20-29, 1F0-4, 1F20-29, 1FSlv10-24.
  8. Santa Rosa County Clerk, Santa Rosa Co., FL Deeds, Volume A, 1850-1873 Genealogical Society of Utah , Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. Film 929,753.
    Transcribed by Warren Culpepper.
  9. General Land Office Records, compiler, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records, Online, Bureau of Land Management.
    http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/
    Doc #9304, Accession # FL0200_.224.
  10. General Land Office Records, compiler, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records, Online, Bureau of Land Management.
    http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/
    Doc #13789, Accession # FL0270_.472.
  11. 1867 Florida State Census, Santa Rosa County, Page 22 (White Inhabitants)
    S. R. Otis, 2 M21+, 1 F21+, 3 Total, 1 M18-45 (therefore 1 M45+).
  12. Santa Rosa Co., FL Marriage Records, Rootsweb: USGenWeb Archives.
    http://www.db229.com/marriages/yearlymaster.htm
    Page 3, S. R. Otis and M. A. Hilliard, 10 Jan 1871.
  13. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    Precinct 1, Santa Rosa Co., FL, Page 174D. LDS CD.
    Sylvester R. Otis, HH, 70, Gardener, CT/CT/CT
    Martha A. Otis, wife, 49, GA/GA/GA [3rd wife?]
    Henrietta M. Otis, dau, 8, FL/CT/GA.
  14. Ancestry.com, compiler, Florida State Census, 1867-1945, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2008.
    http://content.ancestry.com/iexec/?dbid=1506&htx=List&ti=0
    ED 5, Page 3, Lines 39-41, Santa Rosa Co., FL
    S. R. Otis, Head, Wh, M, 49, md, RI/RI/RI, Minister
    Martha Otis, Wife, Wh, F, 49, md, GA/GA/GA
    Henrietta Otis, Dau, Wh, M, 10, sng, FL/RI/GA.
  15. Bagdad Village Preservation Association website:
    http://bagdadvillage.org/village-timeline/.

Malinda (?)

F, (1804 - 1868)
Ancestry Unknown* Information about the ancestry and siblings of Malinda (?) is wanted. See page footer for contact information. 
Name-Psbly She was possibly named Houston. This last name is not proven and is speculated on the basis of the middle name of her son Edwin Houston Otis. However, it is important to note that at the time of Edwin's birth, a very popular American figure was General Sam Houston. Since Edwin's father had been in the Florida Militia (fighting the Seminole Indians), he may well have named his son in honor of General Houston..1 
Birth*1804 Malinda was born at Georgia in 1804.2,3 
Marriage*say 1836 She married Sylvester R. Otis say 1836. Their date of marriage is estimated based on the fact that their first known child was born in 1837. 
Married Namesay 1836  As of say 1836, her married name was Otis. 
(free wh female 20-30) 1840 Census1 June 1840 Malinda was probably a free white female, age 20 and under 30, in Sylvester R. Otis's household, on the 1840 Census at Pike Co., Alabama.4 
(household member) 1860 Census1 June 1860 Malinda, Edwin and Sylvester was listed as a household member living with Sylvester R. Otis in the 1860 Census at Milton, Santa Rosa Co., Florida.3 
(Enumerated) Census1867 She was/were probably enumerated in the census report at Santa Rosa Co., Florida, in 1867.5 
Death*1868 She died at Santa Rosa Co., Florida, in 1868.2 
Burial*1868 Her body was interred in 1868 at Milton Cemetery, Milton, Santa Rosa Co., Florida.2 
Biography* Malinda's last name is not proven and is speculated on the basis of the middle name of her son Edwin Houston Otis. However, it is important to note that at the time of Edwin's birth, a very popular American figure was General Sam Houston. Since Edwin's father had been in the Florida Militia (fighting the Seminole Indians), he may well have named his son in honor of General Houston. 

Family

Sylvester R. Otis (27 January 1810 - 14 June 1893)
Children
Last Edited12 August 2011

Citations

  1. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
  2. Simeon Otis Report, Edie Geiger, 4621 Geiger Road, Milton, FL 32583, to Warren Culpepper, 1999.
  3. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Milton, Santa Rosa Co., FL, Family #244. Ancestry.com image
    S. R. Otis, 57, M, W, Ship Corker, RE=100, PE=100, RI
    Malind Otis, 47, F, W, GA
    E. H. Otis, 23 M, W, Engineer, RE=500, PE=200, FL
    S. R. Otis, 16, M, W, Laborer, AL.
  4. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Unk Twp, Pike Co., AL, Page 372. Ancestry.com image 25
    Sylvester R. Otis, 1M0-4, 1M20-29, 1F0-4, 1F20-29, 1FSlv10-24.
  5. 1867 Florida State Census, Santa Rosa County, Page 22 (White Inhabitants)
    S. R. Otis, 2 M21+, 1 F21+, 3 Total, 1 M18-45 (therefore 1 M45+).

Cornelius Alexander Thames1

M, (29 November 1830 - 29 April 1912)
FatherRev. Jesse T. Thames (6 Oct 1810 - 25 Nov 1872)
MotherMary Ann E. Broughton (8 May 1810 - 14 Oct 1883)
Birth*29 November 1830 Cornelius was born at near Old Salem Church, Monroe Co., Alabama, on 29 November 1830.1,2 
(free wh male 05-10) 1840 Census1 June 1840 Steven and Cornelius was probably a free white male, age 5 and under 10,in Rev. Jesse T. Thames's household, on the 1840 Census at Monroe Co., Alabama.3 
(Family Member) Relocation1844 He was an accompanying familiy member in the relocation of Rev. Jesse T. Thames in 1844 at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.2 
(Household member) 1850 Census1 June 1850 Mary, Cornelius, Steven, Nathaniel, Susan, Sarah, Martha, Jesse, Margaret and Nancy was listed as a household member living with Rev. Jesse T. Thames on the 1850 Census at Conecuh Co., Alabama.4 
Photographed*say 19 December 1850 He was photographed say 19 December 1850 at Conecuh Co., Alabama.5
Cornelius Alexander & Elizabeth (Brantley) Thames
Marriage*19 December 1850 He married Elizabeth A. Brantley at Conecuh Co., Alabama, on 19 December 1850 at age 20.6 
1860 Census*1 June 1860 Cornelius was listed as the head of a family on the 1860 Census at Conecuh Co., Alabama.7 
Civil War*between 1862 and 1865 He served in the War Between the States between 1862 and 1865

     AL 38th Inf Co E as a Sgt. 
Deed16 November 1868 He granted a deed on 16 November 1868 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. & E.A. Thames to W,D.J. Collins, Book A, page 372.8 
1870 Census*1 June 1870 Cornelius was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.9 
Deed22 October 1870 He was granted a deed on 22 October 1870 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C. A. Thames from L. Turk & wife, Book C, page 135.8 
Photographedsay 1880 He was photographed say 1880 at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.5
Cornelius Alexander & Elizabeth (Brantley) Thames
1880 Census*1 June 1880 Cornelius was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.10 
Photographed*say 1885 He was photographed say 1885 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,
Six of the twelve children of Rev. Jesse T. and Mary A. E. Broughton Thames: The sisters pictured are Susan Thames, Lucy Thames and Nancy Thames, in unknown order

The brothers pictured are, left to right: Charlie R. Thames, Nathaniel Thames (great-grandfather of Mary Hollis who provided both of the photographs), and Cornelius Thames (great-great-grandfather of Culpepper Connections' publisher, Warren Culpepper.)11


Cornelius Alexander Thames & siblings
Deed*5 August 1887 He was granted a deed by John Mark Thames and Mary Abigail Thames on 5 August 1887 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. Thames, Sr. from John M & M.A. Thames, Book L, page 471.8 
Deed5 August 1887 He was granted a deed on 5 August 1887 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C. A. Thames from J. W. Glass et al, Book L, page 473.8 
Deed16 May 1890 He granted a deed on 16 May 1890 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. & E.A. Thames to Richard Williams, Book O, page 472.8 
Deed28 March 1892 He was granted a deed on 28 March 1892 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. Thames et al from W.H. Rose & wife, Book R, page 268.8 
Deed28 December 1892 He granted a deed to Jesse Edwin Thames on 28 December 1892 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. Thames & wife to J.E. Thames, Book S, page 151.8 
Deed*1 July 1893 He granted a deed to William Charles Thames on 1 July 1893 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

Wm. C. Thames from C.A. Thames & wife, Book P, page 105.8 
Deed*28 July 1893 He granted a deed to William Charles Thames on 28 July 1893 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. Thames to Wm. C. Thames, Book P, page 105.8 
Deed28 November 1893 He granted a deed on 28 November 1893 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. Thames, adm to J.P. Garvin, Book S, page 353.8 
Deed11 January 1894 He granted a deed on 11 January 1894 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. Thames, adm. to W.A. Findley, Book S, page 425.8 
Deed*13 July 1896 He granted a deed to Jesse Edwin Thames on 13 July 1896 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. Thames to J.E. Thames, Book V, page 36.8 
1900 Census*1 June 1900 Cornelius was listed as the head of a family on the 1900 Census at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.12 
1910 Census*15 April 1910 Cornelius was listed as the head of a family on the 1910 Census at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.13 
Death*29 April 1912 He died at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama, on 29 April 1912 at age 81
Obituary: "Cornelius A. Thames was born in Monroe County near Old Salem Church, and lived there until fourteen years of age when his father moved in the neighborhood of Brooklyn where lived the remainder of his life except four years in the Confederate army, and two years in Florida.... In 1861, when our rights were threatened, he laid aside his industrial implements, donned the Confederate gray, shouldered his musket, and went with company E of the 38th Alabama Reg., ready to be sacrificed upon the altar of his country for what he knew to be right. He never changed his opinion, he was captured at Missionary Ridge and carried as a prisoner of war to that loathsome and inhuman prison Camp Chase where he lay for eleven months until the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee when he was paroled and returned to his home.... The esteem in which he was held can be best understood by the great congregation of people who followed his remains to his final resting place in Brooklyn cemetery. Here he was laid to rest by his church and the Masonic fraternity of which he had been a member for fifty-seven years."14 
Burial*after 29 April 1912 His body was interred after 29 April 1912 at Brooklyn Baptist Church Cemetery, Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama
Descendant* See footnote for the name and contact info of a descendant of Cornelius Alexander Thames who would like to communicate with other descendants.5 

Family

Elizabeth A. Brantley (8 October 1834 - 4 March 1915)
Children
Last Edited31 December 2009

Citations

  1. E-mail to Warren L. Culpepper from Lee Y. Ponder (Thames researcher), 5611 Cypress Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32303, e-mail address.
  2. Hub Broughton e-mail, 2 Aug 2002.
  3. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Unk Twp, Monroe Co., AL, page 228: "1M-4, 2M5-9, 2M20-29, 2F0-4, 1F10-14, 1F20-29."
  4. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Unk Twp, Conecuh Co., AL, page 382 from Lee Ponder: Jesse Thames, 40, M, NC; Mary A. E. 40, F, SC; Cornelius 19, M, AL; Stephen, 13, M, AL; Nathaniel, 15, M, AL; Susan, 13, F, AL; Sarah, 12, F, AL; Martha A., 9, F, AL; Nancy, 6, F, AL; Jesse C, 3, M, AL; Margaret, 2, F, AL.
  5. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
  6. "Mr. & Mrs. Thames were married December 19, 1850." (From an article in a 15 Jul 1908 Conecuh County newspaper, written by a guest at a reunion of the C. A. Thames family).
  7. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Evergreen, Conecuh Co., AL, page 1000, Hse 335, fam 315.
    Ancestry.com Image 44. transcription by Warren Culpepper
    Cornelius Thames, 29, M, Carpenter, RE=500, PE=1000, AL
    Elizabeth Thames, 25, F, AL
    Alex Thames, 8, M, AL
    Jno Thames, 5, M, AL
    James Thames, 4, M, AL
    Adam Thames, 1, M, AL
    Mary Thames, 3/12, F, AL.
  8. Conecuh County Court, Conecuh Co., AL, Direct Index to Deeds A-Z 1866-1901 GSU, Salt Lake City, 1989 (FHL Film 1,630,472 #1) .
  9. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Beat 7, Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., AL, page 3, Transcription by Gertrude Stevens
    Cornelius Thames, 39, M, Wheelwright, RE=400, PE=300, AL
    Elizabeth Thames, 35, F, AL
    Alex Thames, 18, M, Mail messenger, AL
    John Thames, 16, M, Farm Laborer, AL
    James Thames, 14, M, Farm Laborer, AL
    Adam Thames, 11, M, AL
    Mary Thames, 10, F, AL
    Jesse Thames, 3, M, AL
    William Thames, 1, M, AL.
  10. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., AL, page 87C, based on LDS CD transcription
    Cornelius A. Thames, HH, 50, AL, NC, SC, Farmer
    Elizabeth Thames, Wife, 46, AL, SC, AL
    Mary Thames, Dau, 20, AL, AL, AL
    Jessey Thames, Son, 13, AL, AL, AL
    William Thames, Son, 11, AL, AL, AL
    Elizabeth Thames, Dau, 9, AL, AL, AL
    Lucey Thames, Dau, 6, AL, AL, AL
    Stephen Thames, Son, 4, AL, AL, AL
    Nathaniel Thames, Son, 1, AL, AL, AL.
  11. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
    from Mary Hollis, great granddaughter of Nathaniel Thames.
  12. 1900 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 51, Page 239A, Family 155, Gen.com img 17, Brooklyn Precinct 7, Conecuh Co., AL
    Cornelius A. Thames, Head, Nov 1830, 69, md 49 years, AL, SC, SC, Farmer
    Elizabeth A. Thames, Head, Oct 1834, 65, md 49 years, 13 children/11 living, AL, AL, SC
    Lucy J. Thames, Daughter, Mar 1873, 27, S, AL, AL, AL.
  13. 1910 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 40, Page 132B, Genealogy.com image 20, Family 172, Brooklyn Precinct 7, Conecuh Co., AL
    Cornelius Thames, Head, M, 79, Md1 59 yrs, AL/AL/AL, able to read/write, Confederate Army Vet
    Elizabeth Thames, Wife, F, 75, Md1 59 yrs, ch 12/12, AL/AL/AL, able to read/write.
  14. From a tribute from a comrad in a 15 May 1912, Conecuh County newspaper, provided by Hub Broughton in e-mail of 2 Aug 2002.

Elizabeth A. Brantley1

F, (8 October 1834 - 4 March 1915)
FatherJoseph Van Buren Brantley (6 Aug 1813 - 18 Feb 1893)
MotherEmily Katherine Travis (26 Mar 1814 - 23 Dec 1870)
Birth*8 October 1834 Elizabeth was born at Conecuh Co., Alabama, on 8 October 1834.1 
(free wh female 05-10) 1840 Census1 June 1840 Elizabeth was probably a free white female, age 5 and under 10, in Joseph Van Buren Brantley's household, on the 1840 Census at Conecuh Co., Alabama.2 
(Household member) 1850 Census1 June 1850 Emily, Elizabeth, Eliza, William, Susan, Joseph, Edwin and John was listed as a household member living with Joseph Van Buren Brantley on the 1850 Census at Conecuh Co., Alabama.3 
Photographed*say 19 December 1850 She was photographed say 19 December 1850 at Conecuh Co., Alabama.4
Cornelius Alexander & Elizabeth (Brantley) Thames
Marriage*19 December 1850 She married Cornelius Alexander Thames at Conecuh Co., Alabama, on 19 December 1850 at age 16.5 
Married Namecirca 1851  As of circa 1851, her married name was Thames. 
(household member) 1860 Census1 June 1860 Elizabeth, Alexander, John, James, Cornelius and Mary was listed as a household member living with Cornelius Alexander Thames in the 1860 Census at Conecuh Co., Alabama.6 
Deed16 November 1868 She granted a deed on 16 November 1868 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. & E.A. Thames to W,D.J. Collins, Book A, page 372.7 
(household member) 1870 Census1 June 1870 Elizabeth, Alexander, John, James, Cornelius, Mary, Jesse and William listed as a household member living with Cornelius Alexander Thames on the 1870 Census at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.8 
Photographedsay 1880 She was photographed say 1880 at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.4
Cornelius Alexander & Elizabeth (Brantley) Thames
(Wife) 1880 Census1 June 1880 Elizabeth was listed as Cornelius Alexander Thames's wife on the 1880 Census at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.9 
Deed16 May 1890 She granted a deed on 16 May 1890 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. & E.A. Thames to Richard Williams, Book O, page 472.7 
Deed28 December 1892 She granted a deed to Jesse Edwin Thames on 28 December 1892 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

C.A. Thames & wife to J.E. Thames, Book S, page 151.7 
Deed*1 July 1893 She granted a deed to William Charles Thames on 1 July 1893 at Conecuh Co., Alabama,

Wm. C. Thames from C.A. Thames & wife, Book P, page 105.7 
Photographed*circa 1895 She was photographed circa 1895 at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.10
Elizabeth A. (Brantley) Thames
(Wife) 1900 Census1 June 1900 Elizabeth was listed as Cornelius Alexander Thames's wife on the 1900 Census at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.11 
(Wife) 1910 Census15 April 1910 Elizabeth was listed as Cornelius Alexander Thames's wife on the 1910 Census at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama.12 
Death*4 March 1915 She died at Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama, on 4 March 1915 at age 80.1 
Burial*circa 6 March 1915 Her body was interred circa 6 March 1915 at Brooklyn Baptist Church Cemetery, Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., Alabama

Family

Cornelius Alexander Thames (29 November 1830 - 29 April 1912)
Children
Last Edited31 December 2009

Citations

  1. E-mail to Warren L. Culpepper from Lee Y. Ponder (Thames researcher), 5611 Cypress Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32303, e-mail address.
  2. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Unk Twp, Conecuh Co., AL, page 260, Ancestry.com image 4 transcribed by Warren Culpepper
    Joseph V. Brantley, 1M0-4, 1M20-29, 2F0-4, 1F5-9, 1F20-29.
  3. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 335B, Family 48, Ancestry.com image 10, Unk Twp, Conecuh Co., AL
    Joseph V. Brantley, 37, M, SC, Farmer, $600
    Emily Brantley, 36, F, SC
    Elizabeth Brantley, 16, F, AL
    Eliza Brantley, 13, F, AL
    William Brantley, 13, M, AL
    Jemima Brantley, 10, F, AL
    Susan Brantley, 10, F, AL
    Joseph Brantley, 6, M, AL
    Edwin Brantley, 3, M, AL
    John Brantley, 1, M, AL
    John McBride, 15, M, SC, Farmer.
  4. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
  5. "Mr. & Mrs. Thames were married December 19, 1850." (From an article in a 15 Jul 1908 Conecuh County newspaper, written by a guest at a reunion of the C. A. Thames family).
  6. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Evergreen, Conecuh Co., AL, page 1000, Hse 335, fam 315.
    Ancestry.com Image 44. transcription by Warren Culpepper
    Cornelius Thames, 29, M, Carpenter, RE=500, PE=1000, AL
    Elizabeth Thames, 25, F, AL
    Alex Thames, 8, M, AL
    Jno Thames, 5, M, AL
    James Thames, 4, M, AL
    Adam Thames, 1, M, AL
    Mary Thames, 3/12, F, AL.
  7. Conecuh County Court, Conecuh Co., AL, Direct Index to Deeds A-Z 1866-1901 GSU, Salt Lake City, 1989 (FHL Film 1,630,472 #1) .
  8. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Beat 7, Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., AL, page 3, Transcription by Gertrude Stevens
    Cornelius Thames, 39, M, Wheelwright, RE=400, PE=300, AL
    Elizabeth Thames, 35, F, AL
    Alex Thames, 18, M, Mail messenger, AL
    John Thames, 16, M, Farm Laborer, AL
    James Thames, 14, M, Farm Laborer, AL
    Adam Thames, 11, M, AL
    Mary Thames, 10, F, AL
    Jesse Thames, 3, M, AL
    William Thames, 1, M, AL.
  9. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    Brooklyn, Conecuh Co., AL, page 87C, based on LDS CD transcription
    Cornelius A. Thames, HH, 50, AL, NC, SC, Farmer
    Elizabeth Thames, Wife, 46, AL, SC, AL
    Mary Thames, Dau, 20, AL, AL, AL
    Jessey Thames, Son, 13, AL, AL, AL
    William Thames, Son, 11, AL, AL, AL
    Elizabeth Thames, Dau, 9, AL, AL, AL
    Lucey Thames, Dau, 6, AL, AL, AL
    Stephen Thames, Son, 4, AL, AL, AL
    Nathaniel Thames, Son, 1, AL, AL, AL.
  10. E-mail written 2003-2007 to Warren Culpepper from Vivian McLendon Pridgen-Brockway (#43320), e-mail address.
  11. 1900 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 51, Page 239A, Family 155, Gen.com img 17, Brooklyn Precinct 7, Conecuh Co., AL
    Cornelius A. Thames, Head, Nov 1830, 69, md 49 years, AL, SC, SC, Farmer
    Elizabeth A. Thames, Head, Oct 1834, 65, md 49 years, 13 children/11 living, AL, AL, SC
    Lucy J. Thames, Daughter, Mar 1873, 27, S, AL, AL, AL.
  12. 1910 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 40, Page 132B, Genealogy.com image 20, Family 172, Brooklyn Precinct 7, Conecuh Co., AL
    Cornelius Thames, Head, M, 79, Md1 59 yrs, AL/AL/AL, able to read/write, Confederate Army Vet
    Elizabeth Thames, Wife, F, 75, Md1 59 yrs, ch 12/12, AL/AL/AL, able to read/write.

Dr. Samuel Boykin1

M, (1786 - 29 April 1848)
FatherMajor Francis Boykin (1751 - 17 Aug 1821)
MotherCatherine Whitaker (s 1748 - a 1800)
Birth*1786 Samuel was born at Camden, Camden District, South Carolina, in 1786. Birthplace is that shown in Boykin Family Bible. However, his father, Francis, is reported to have been in Washington (later Baldwin) Co., GA by 1785.2,3 
Tax roll*1813 He registered to pay taxes at Baldwin Co., Georgia, in 1813.4 
Marriage*26 March 1818 He married Sarah Ann Maria Maxwell at seat of Col. Farish Carter, near, Milledgeville, Baldwin Co., Georgia, on 26 March 1818.5 
Land Lottery*1820 He had a fortunate draw in the land lottery in 1820 at Baldwin Co., Georgia,
lot 12, section 3 of Irwin Co; and lot 70, section 19 of Early Co.6 
Biography1821 The Whitaker Place.
     In Baldwin County, about twelve miles to the southeast of Milledgeville, lies the plantation known for many years as the "Whitaker Place." It was originally owned by Maj. Francis Boykin, a South Carolinian, prominent in the war of the Revolution, who moved to this county in 1800. He was a successful farmer and accumulated a large area of land which lay on the east side of the Oconee River for a long distance, and extended toward the east to Gum Creek, the dividing line between Washington and Baldwin counties.
     At that time, boats came up the river as far as Milledgeville. Maj. Boykin was appointed one of the River Commissioners, whose duties were to see that the stream was kept clear of snags and other obstructions interfering with the passage of the boats.
     In 1821, Maj. Boykin died. He left two sons and one daughter, Dr. Samuel Boykin, who practiced medicine in Milledgeville; Mr. James Boykin, a Deacon in the Baptist Church; and Miss Eliza Boykin, who married the father of Prof. William Rutherford, of Athens, Ga. Prof. Rutherford was the father of Miss Mildred Rutherford, to whom the South owes a lasting debt of gratitude for the preservation of much of its history.
     Upon the death of his father, Dr. Samuel Boykin gave up his practice in Milledgeville and moved to the plantation. He built a large two-story house for a residence, which became known for miles around as "The White House," because it was the only painted house in the community. He was a great lover of plants and flowers and was the first to demonstrate that sugar cane could be grown in Georgia as high up as Baldwin County. In 1836, he decided to move to Alabama, and sold his plantation to Mr. William Whitaker, a kinsman, who had recently moved into the community from North Carolina.
     William Whitaker cultivated the soil as did Dr. Boykin, and grew large crops of corn, cotton and other products.
     In those days, people traveled by stage coach, and on the long roads there were "Relay Stations" where fresh horses were exchanged for the tired ones, which rested until the return trips. A Relay Station was located on this place and was the center of much interest.
     Upon the death of William Whitaker, the plantation was divided into three parts, and his three children, James, Samuel, and Martha drew for a part.
     The part upon which Dr. Boykin's residence was located, fell to Samuel Whitaker. By that time, this place was very attractive; tall oaks shaded the white sandy yard; in the rear were several black walnut trees which, in later years, attained to immense size. Cherokee rose vines draped the trees on either side of the avenue leading to the public road. Down this road, to the right, was a lane leading to the negro quarters. At the end of the lane was the Overseer's house. On one side of the lane was the Gin House, the first built in that section of the country. This was burned by Sherman's men when a part of his army encamped for several days on that plantation, leaving desolation and ruin behind it.
     At another point, the lane was shaded by a sugar berry tree, unusually tall and branching. There was a superstition among the negroes that this tree was haunted by a spirit which could foretell death, because it had been observed that, just before a death occurred on the place, the tree gave forth a weird and peculiar sound as of the opening of a creaky door. When this was heard, consternation filled the Quarters, be- cause no one doubted but that someone's days were numbered.
     Samuel Whitaker kept a Diary, in which each day's work was faithfully recorded. Every field was designated by its own particular name-as "The New Ground," "The Vineyard Field," "The Goode Field" -the name was symbolic of the nature of the soil or of some association.
     Mrs. Whitaker took an active interest in the religious training of the negroes. A place was provided where they could assemble in public worship. The negro children would come from the Quarters on Sunday afternoons and sit on the steps of her front porch, the larger ones standing in line on the ground, while she talked to them of spiritual things and taught them lessons from the Bible.
     At the close of the war, when losses were heavy, the plantation passed into the hands of Mr. Wirtzfielder, who owned it for a number of years, then sold it to Mr. Sam Walker. After Mr. Walker's death, it became the property of his daughter, Mrs. John Shinholser. Mr. Shinholser now owns the place.
     Mr. Whitaker rented the plantation, after it passed from his hands, and lived there until his death. He was married three times and reared two sons and three daughters: the late William Whitaker was his elder son; the younger son was Dr. James M. Whitaker, for many years on the staff of physicians of the State Sanitarium. The three daughters were Mrs. Elbert Bivins, Mrs. H. D. Allen and Mrs. O. M. Cone.7,8
The Whitaker Place
Marriage*31 July 1822 He married Narcissa Cooper at Eatonton, Putnam Co., Georgia, on 31 July 1822.3,9 
Jury*April 1827 He served on a jury in April 1827 at Baldwin Co., Georgia,
     Grand Jury of Superior Court.10 
Deed*1829 He was granted a deed by James William Boykin in 1829 at Boykin Hall, Milledgeville, Baldwin Co., Georgia.11 
Event-MiscJuly 1835 He served on Grand Jury Also served in Aug 1830 and Sep 1831 in July 1835 at Baldwin Co., Georgia, (an unknown value.)12 
Relocation*1836 He relocated in 1836 at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia,2 
1840 Census*1 June 1840 Samuel was listed as the head of a family on the 1840 Census at Muscogee Co., Georgia. Male age 30-40.13 
(Executor) Will29 May 1843 In Thomas Cooper Jr.'s will, Mark, Samuel and Eugenius was named by Thomas to handle his estate on 29 May 1843.14 
Will*28 April 1848 He made a will at Muscogee Co., Georgia, on 28 April 1848, naming as executor(s) Narcissa Boykin, Francis Boykin, Rev. Samuel Boykin Jr. and Mark Anthony Cooper, naming as heir(s) Rev. Thomas Cooper Boykin and LeRoy Holt Boykin.

Last Will and Testament of Samuel Boykin
Executed 28 Apr 1848 and proved 22 May 1848 in Muscogee Co., GA.
     In the name of God, Amen. I Samuel Boykin being of sound mind and desirous of disposing of all property that I may be entitled to at my death constitute this as my last will & testament.
     1st, I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Narcissa my carriage and horses, plate and household furniture absolutely.
     2nd, I give and bequeath to my wife Narcissa, for her special use and benefit during her life the following property - to wit: my residence in the city of Columbus with the four lots immediately joining it, and the four other lots lying near it on the opposite sides of the street on which my residence stands, and the following house servants - to wit: Charlotte & her two children Lin and Bird Grace, Leila & her two children Mary Ann & Dafra, Lizzy and old Sall, and at her death I wish said property to go in equal shares to such of my children as shall survive her and the children of such as may be dead at her decease.
     3rd, I give and bequeath all the balance of my property in equal shares to my wife (in case she declines dower) & my children the child's part assigned to my wife by this item. I give and bequeath to her during her natural life, at her death to be distributed in the same way I have directed the property assigned for her use in the second item of my will. I further will and bequeath to each of my daughters her share for her special use & benefit not to be sold or in any way disposed of by her husband, in case she marries and at her death in case she marries and dies without issue leaving a husband, one half this property to her husband and the other half to each of my children as may survive her. I further will and bequeath to each of my sons his share, and in case he should marry and die without issue, one half of said share to his surviving wife, and the other half to such of my children as may survive him. I further will and desire my executors hereinafter appointed to give to each of my sons, Francis, Samuel, Thomas and Leroy as a portion of that part of my estate falling to his share one fourth part of my plantation lying on the Chattahoochee in Russell County, if each one when he becomes of age should be willing to take said fourth part of said plantation as a portion of his distribution share, and it should be deemed possible by my executors so to assign my said plantation to my sons, in four equal parts and at such time as my executors shall deem it proper and expedient for the interest of all the legatees.
     4th, I will and desire my executors to sell and dispose of all my real esate not mentioned in any of the foregoing items at such time & in such way as they may deem to be for the interest of my estate.
     5th, I here appoint and constitute my wife Narcissa Boykin, Mark A. Cooper, and my two sons Francis & Samuel Boykin my executors under this my last will and testament.
     In witness whereof I have signed, sealed and published these presents this 28th day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty eight. /s/ S. Boykin
     In the presence of Leroy Holt, Frank A. Nisbet, James N. Owens, John E. Bacon.15
 
Death*29 April 1848 He died at Summerville, Russell Co., Alabama, on 29 April 1848
(The Emily Boykin Tichenor Family Bible erroneously gives date of death as 27 Apr 1848, one day before Samuel made his final Will.)3 
Burial* His body was interred at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia.16 
Probate20 May 1848 Probate action was taken on Samuel's estate on 20 May 1848 at Muscogee Co., Georgia.15 
Biography* Dr. Samuel Boykin was educated at the University of Georgia (graduated 1807) and the Pennsylvania Medical College in Philadelphia. Practiced medicine in Milledgeville for 25 years. State Senator. Also engaged in banking. On the committee of distinguished citizens to entertain General LaFayette on his tour of America when he visited Milledgeville. A man of considerable scientific attainment and reputation, he was the discoverer of several species of flowers and shells which bare his name (Genus "Boykinia" Named for Him). The celebrated English botanist, Lyell, visited him in Columbus and makes mention of him in one of his works. He was the first to demonstrate sugar cane could be grown in GA as high up as Baldwin Co. In 1836 he sold his plantation to William Whitaker, a kinsman. He moved his planting interests to Alabama and settled his family in Columbus, Georgia.

BOYKIN HALL
(From an unknown publication)
Major Francis Boykin, a North Carolinian, who served with Nathaniel Greene during the Revolutionary War, became the owner of a large tract of land east of the Oconee River (1785), about twelve miles from where Milledgeville was laid off in 1803. At his death, (1821) one of his sons, Dr. Samuel Boykin, who lived in Milledgeville, gave up his practice to manage this plantation and was most successful. He was first to demonstrate that sugar could be made in this section, by growing splendid sugar cane, and is mentioned for this feat in Adiel Sherwood's Gazetteer of 1829.

In 1830, Dr. Boykin built a two story Colonial home, which was known as "The White House" because of the fact that it was the only house in the settlement which was painted. But the doctor decided to move to Columbus about 1836 and sold his home to a kinsman, William Whitaker, who continued to cultivate the soil. After Mr. Whitaker's death, his widow and children lived there for a time, and when she passed away, the plantation was divided into four parts, each of the four children drawing lots to see which part fell to them. The plantation upon which this home had been built fell to Samuel E. Whitaker, the father of Mrs. Henry Dawson Allen, of Milledgeville, and this was her childhood home. In 1935, Mrs. Allen, who was Miss Sarah Canty Whitaker, was named Baldwin County's most distinguished citizen and was presented a certificate to this effect by the International Kiwanis, as this honor had been conferred upon her through the local Kiwanis organization.

After the War Between the States this plantation passed out of the possession of the Whitaker family and is now owned by Mr. and Mrs. John Shinholser, the plantation going by the name of Indian Island Farm and Ranch. Mr. Shinholser's grandparents lived in Scottsboro over a hundred years ago, when it was noted as a summer resort, and although 11e was born in Wilkinson County, he has lived most of his life in Baldwin.

Mrs. Shinholser, who was Miss Hallie McHenry of Madison, Georgia, a charming gracious woman, is an artist of considerable note. Although the Shinholsers do not now live in this hor?re, which they call "Boykin Hall", they are doing much to restore the old ante-bellum house. Not far from "Boykin Hall", they have a modern dwelling where old Southern hospitality still holds sway. On this Indian Island Plantation, there is an artesian well, the only flowing well in Baldwin County. The water from this well forms a big swimming pool, which is one of the many attractions of the Plantation. There are also many Indian Mounds on this historic place.

Not far from "Boykin Hall" is the burial ground of the Boykin and Whitaker families. Here lies the body of Major Francis Boykin, a Revolutionary ancestor of the late Miss Mildred Rutherford of Athens, an educator and historian of note.

BOYKIN BIBLE
In possession of Mrs. Thomas Whitner, Atlanta, Ga.

On the fly leaf is inscribed, "To sister Emily from Sam and Laura, April 16, 1861," referring to Emily Catherine Boykin, daughter of Dr. Samuel Boykin, who married I. T. Tichenor. Dr. Samuel Boykin's father was Francis Boykin, Revolutionary soldier of S. C. and Ga. The father of Dr. Samuel Boykin's wife was Thos. Cooper of Henry Co., Va., later of Hancock Co., Ga., and the records of both of these are upon the Roll of Patriots of the D.A.R. The Bible was evidently a bridal present and the entries were made by Mrs. Tichenor. The first birth recorded, Burwell Boykin was the son of Dr. Samuel Boykin by his 1st. wife, Sarah Maria Maxwell.

MARRIAGES:
Francis Boykin and Catherine Whitaker of S.C. had three children: Eliza married Williams Rutherford; James, who was twice married, 1st. to Miss Owens and 2nd. to Miss Rutherford of N. C.

Dr. Samuel Boykin d. in Summerville, Russell Co., Ala., 4-27-1848, m. at Eatonville, Ga., 7-31-1822, to Narcissa Cooper, b. in Powelton, Ga., 1804, d. 6-14-1859, in Augusta, Ga.

Francis Boykin and L. A. Nuchols, 11-24-1849
Samuel Boykin and Laura Nisbet, 5-10-1853
Narcissa Boykin and T. G. Holt, 12-14-1854
Thomas C. Boykin and Arabella Alexander, 4-13-1858
2nd. 5-4-1881 to Mattie Dickson
Leroy H. Boykin and Laura E. Hunter, 2-13-1859
Harriet E. Boykin and Wm. R. Turman, 11-25-1862
Emily Catherine Boykin and I. T. Tichenor
Lulah Boykin and I. T. Tichenor

BIRTHS:
Dr. Samuel Boykin, b. in Kershaw District, S. C., 1786.
Burwell Boykin, 2-14-1819     
Francis Boykin, 7-30-1825     
Samuel Boykin, 11-24-1829     
Emily C. Boykin, 4-16-1832
Narcissa Boykin, 12-14-1833
Thomas C. Boykin, 1-1-l836
Harriet E. Boykin, 11-25-1837
LeRoy H. Boykin, 3-28-1840
James H. Boykin, 8-7-1843, d. 3-31-1847
Lulah Boykin, 7-7-1847

DEATHS:
James H. Boykin, d. early.
Francis Boykin, d. in Barbour Co., Ala, 1863
Emily B. Tichenor at Union Springs, Ala, 1864
Lulah Tichenor, in Shelby Co., Ala, 1869
Samuel Boykin, in Nashville, Tenn, 1899
Thomas C. Boykin, in Atlanta, Ga, 1902
Narcissa B. Holt,in Atlanta, Ga, 1912
Harriet B. Turman, in Atlanta, Ga, 1903
LeRoy H. Boykin (date not known.)

==================================================================.
 
Descendant* See footnote for the name and contact info of a descendant of Dr. Samuel Boykin who would like to communicate with other descendants.17 

Family 1

Sarah Ann Maria Maxwell (28 August 1797 - 3 November 1820)
Child

Family 2

Narcissa Cooper (28 April 1803 - 14 June 1857)
Children
Last Edited27 February 2016

Citations

  1. Boykin Family Papers, Collected by Eleanor Boykin (#9929) and given to Warren Culpepper, 1983.
  2. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Chapter 5, pp 53-57.
  3. Mrs. Bun Wylie -- State Regent 1930-32, Boykin Family Bible (Given to Emily Boykin Tichenor on 16 Apr 1861 by Sam and Laura Boykin), Transcription contained in "Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters, DAR, Vol. IV Old Bible Records and Land Lotteries, 1932.
  4. Frances T. Ingmire, Baldwin Co., GA 1813 Tax List, page 2:
    Francis Boykin, Brown's District
    James Boykin, Brown's District
    Samuel Boykin, 1 Poll.
  5. Mary Bondurant Warren, Marriages and Deaths, 1763-1820, Abstracted from Extant Georgia Newspapers, 1968, page 12.
  6. The Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas Jr., 1820 Land Lottery of Georgia, Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC, 1986, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8 R2la.
  7. Anna Maria Green Cook, History of Baldwin County
    , Anderson, SC: Kays-Hearn, 1925 (Pages 115-117).
    Article by Mrs. O. M. Cone, 1925, Pages 476-478.
  8. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
    photo by Warren Culpepper, 2015.
  9. Photocopy of Marriage License, "Samuel Boykin and Narcissa Cooper, License dated 31 Jul 1822, Putnam CO., GA."
  10. Tad Evans, compiler, Milledgeville, Georgia, Newspaper Clippings: Southern Recorder, 1820-1827, Vol. I, Savannah, GA: T. Evans, 1995, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8573/M1 B3e v. 1.
    Vol XII, page 274.
  11. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    Alexander's - Southside VA/NC, GA & AL.
  12. Tad Evans, compiler, Milledgeville, Georgia, Newspaper Clippings: Southern Recorder, 1828-1832, Vol. II, Savannah, GA: T. Evans, 1996, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8573/M1 B3e v. 2.
    S. Boykin, p. 342.
  13. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Ancestry.com image.
  14. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Will dated 29 May 1843 and probated 10 Jul 1843. Page 29: Cites Will Book B-page 178.
  15. Muscogee Co., GA Court of Probate Records. Transcribed by Warren Culpepper from photocopy by Mrs. Eugene Millsaps III.
  16. Tombstone in Linwood Centery, Columbus, GA: "Samuel Boykin, 1784 - 1848, Age 62."
  17. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.

Narcissa Cooper1

F, (28 April 1803 - 14 June 1857)
FatherThomas Cooper Jr. (1771 - 5 Jul 1843)
MotherJudith Harvey (s 1775 - )
Birth*28 April 1803 Narcissa was born at Powelton, Hancock Co., Georgia, on 28 April 1803.2 
Marriage*31 July 1822 She married Dr. Samuel Boykin at Eatonton, Putnam Co., Georgia, on 31 July 1822 at age 19.2,3 
Married Name31 July 1822  As of 31 July 1822, her married name was Boykin. 
Letter at PO*April 1834 She had a letter at the Post Office in April 1834 at Baldwin Co., Georgia.4 
Letter at PO20 October 1835 She had a letter at the Post Office (Mrs. S. Boykin) on 20 October 1835 at Eatonton, Putnam Co., Georgia.5 
(free wh female 30-40) 1840 Census1 June 1840 Narcissa was probably a free white female, age 30 and under 40, in Dr. Samuel Boykin's household, on the 1840 Census on 1 June 1840 at Muscogee Co., Georgia.6 
(Executor) Will28 April 1848 Narcissa, Francis, Samuel and Mark named as executor(s) in the will of Dr. Samuel Boykin at Muscogee Co., Georgia, on 28 April 1848.7 
1850 Census*1 June 1850 Narcissa was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census on 1 June 1850 at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia.8 
Death*14 June 1857 She died at Planters' Hotel, Augusta, Richmond Co., Georgia, on 14 June 1857 at age 54.2,9 
Burial* Her body was interred at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia

Family

Dr. Samuel Boykin (1786 - 29 April 1848)
Children
Last Edited4 December 2002

Citations

  1. Boykin Family Papers, Collected by Eleanor Boykin (#9929) and given to Warren Culpepper, 1983.
  2. Mrs. Bun Wylie -- State Regent 1930-32, Boykin Family Bible (Given to Emily Boykin Tichenor on 16 Apr 1861 by Sam and Laura Boykin), Transcription contained in "Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters, DAR, Vol. IV Old Bible Records and Land Lotteries, 1932.
  3. Photocopy of Marriage License, "Samuel Boykin and Narcissa Cooper, License dated 31 Jul 1822, Putnam CO., GA."
  4. Tad Evans, compiler, Milledgeville, Georgia, Newspaper Clippings: Southern Recorder, 1820-1827, Vol. I, Savannah, GA: T. Evans, 1995, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8573/M1 B3e v. 1.
    Vol XII, page 431.
  5. Tad Evans, Georgia Newspaper Clippings, Putnam Co. Extracts, Vol. 2, T. Evans, Savannah, GA, 1998.
    page 12.
  6. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Ancestry.com image.
  7. Muscogee Co., GA Court of Probate Records. Transcribed by Warren Culpepper from photocopy by Mrs. Eugene Millsaps III.
  8. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    pages 338 and 339, Ancestry.com images 87 & 89
    Mrs. Narcissa Boykin, 47, F, GA
    Samuel Boykin, 20, M, GA
    Emily C. Boykin, 18, F, GA
    Narcissa Boykin, 16, F, GA
    Eliza H. Boykin, 12, F, GA
    Leroy Boykin, 10, M, GA
    Lula Boykin, 4, F, GA
    Thomas C. Boykin, 14, M, GA (separated from rest of family and listed at very end of census).
  9. Tad Evans, Georgia Newspaper Clippings, Putnam Co. Extracts, Vol. 2, T. Evans, Savannah, GA, 1998.
    page 215.

Angelica Bray

F, (say 1672 - )
Ancestry Unknown* Information about the ancestry and siblings of Angelica Bray is wanted. See page footer for contact information. 
Birth*say 1672 Angelica was born say 1672. 
Married Namesay 1690  As of say 1690, her married name was Baker. 
Marriage*say 1690 She married Lt. Col. Henry Baker III say 1690. 

Family

Lt. Col. Henry Baker III (say 1670 - )
Child
Last Edited1 January 2012

Major Francis Boykin

M, (1751 - 17 August 1821)
FatherWilliam Boykin II (b 1710 - c 1784)
MotherElizabeth Bryant (s 1712 - )
Birth*1751 Francis was born at Southampton Co., Virginia, in 1751. 
(Family Member) Relocationcirca 1755 He, as a family member, accompanied William Boykin II in relocating circa 1755 at Craven Co., South Carolina; from Southampton Co., VA1 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 DAR Listing: "Francis Boykin, born circa 1755 in North Carolina, died 18 Aug 1821 in Georgia, married Catherine Whitaker, Major, South Carolina"
     Francis served as a lieutenant in the First Regiment in June 1775 and was Captain in the Rangers under Capt. Eli Kershaw during 1775/1776. He was a major in the Second Dragoons under Col. Myddleton and Gen. Sumter during 1782.2,3
 
Marriage*circa 1780 He married Catherine Whitaker at Camden, Camden District, South Carolina, circa 1780. 
Land Grant/Patent*1786 Land was granted to Major Francis Boykin in 1786 at Washington Co., Georgia,

(287.5 acres).4 
Jury*March 1788 He served on a jury in March 1788 at Burke Co., Georgia,
     Grand Jury.5 
Biographybetween 1791 and 1798 Francis was a magistrate of the Kershaw County Court and has numerous entries in the minutes of the Court in the 1790's. He also was the plaintiff in several lawsuits involving money due him. On 8 May 1795, he successfully petitioned the court for opening a road into his plantation on the river from the "Great Road". Two years later, some of the workers on Francis' road were ordered to then work on another road.6 
(Executor) Will25 December 1791 Francis, Burwell and John named as executor(s) in the will of Samuel Boykin at Kershaw Co., South Carolina, on 25 December 1791.7 
Relocation*circa 1800 He relocated circa 1800 at Washington Co., Georgia,8 
Land Lottery*1805 Francis participated in but did not win the land lottery in 1805 at Washington Co., Georgia,
land in Baldwin, Wayne and Wilkinson counties.9 
Land Grant/Patent1809 Land was granted to Major Francis Boykin in 1809 at Washington Co., Georgia,

(538 acres).10 
Tax roll*1813 He registered to pay taxes at Baldwin Co., Georgia, in 1813.11 
Event-Misc*23 November 1819 He on 23 November 1819 at Baldwin Co., Georgia, Notice posted in "Georgia Journal": Baldwin Co. For Sale. My plantation. 2,000 acres on Oconee and Town Creek. Also 35 negros and livestock. Apply to Francis Boykin. 10 miles below Milledgeville.12 
1820 Census*7 August 1820 Francis was listed as the head of a family on the 1820 Census at Baldwin Co., Georgia. 1M16-25, 1M45+, 21 in agriculture, 29 slaves.13 
Biography1821 The Whitaker Place.
     In Baldwin County, about twelve miles to the southeast of Milledgeville, lies the plantation known for many years as the "Whitaker Place." It was originally owned by Maj. Francis Boykin, a South Carolinian, prominent in the war of the Revolution, who moved to this county in 1800. He was a successful farmer and accumulated a large area of land which lay on the east side of the Oconee River for a long distance, and extended toward the east to Gum Creek, the dividing line between Washington and Baldwin counties.
     At that time, boats came up the river as far as Milledgeville. Maj. Boykin was appointed one of the River Commissioners, whose duties were to see that the stream was kept clear of snags and other obstructions interfering with the passage of the boats.
     In 1821, Maj. Boykin died. He left two sons and one daughter, Dr. Samuel Boykin, who practiced medicine in Milledgeville; Mr. James Boykin, a Deacon in the Baptist Church; and Miss Eliza Boykin, who married the father of Prof. William Rutherford, of Athens, Ga. Prof. Rutherford was the father of Miss Mildred Rutherford, to whom the South owes a lasting debt of gratitude for the preservation of much of its history.
     Upon the death of his father, Dr. Samuel Boykin gave up his practice in Milledgeville and moved to the plantation. He built a large two-story house for a residence, which became known for miles around as "The White House," because it was the only painted house in the community. He was a great lover of plants and flowers and was the first to demonstrate that sugar cane could be grown in Georgia as high up as Baldwin County. In 1836, he decided to move to Alabama, and sold his plantation to Mr. William Whitaker, a kinsman, who had recently moved into the community from North Carolina.
     William Whitaker cultivated the soil as did Dr. Boykin, and grew large crops of corn, cotton and other products.
     In those days, people traveled by stage coach, and on the long roads there were "Relay Stations" where fresh horses were exchanged for the tired ones, which rested until the return trips. A Relay Station was located on this place and was the center of much interest.
     Upon the death of William Whitaker, the plantation was divided into three parts, and his three children, James, Samuel, and Martha drew for a part.
     The part upon which Dr. Boykin's residence was located, fell to Samuel Whitaker. By that time, this place was very attractive; tall oaks shaded the white sandy yard; in the rear were several black walnut trees which, in later years, attained to immense size. Cherokee rose vines draped the trees on either side of the avenue leading to the public road. Down this road, to the right, was a lane leading to the negro quarters. At the end of the lane was the Overseer's house. On one side of the lane was the Gin House, the first built in that section of the country. This was burned by Sherman's men when a part of his army encamped for several days on that plantation, leaving desolation and ruin behind it.
     At another point, the lane was shaded by a sugar berry tree, unusually tall and branching. There was a superstition among the negroes that this tree was haunted by a spirit which could foretell death, because it had been observed that, just before a death occurred on the place, the tree gave forth a weird and peculiar sound as of the opening of a creaky door. When this was heard, consternation filled the Quarters, be- cause no one doubted but that someone's days were numbered.
     Samuel Whitaker kept a Diary, in which each day's work was faithfully recorded. Every field was designated by its own particular name-as "The New Ground," "The Vineyard Field," "The Goode Field" -the name was symbolic of the nature of the soil or of some association.
     Mrs. Whitaker took an active interest in the religious training of the negroes. A place was provided where they could assemble in public worship. The negro children would come from the Quarters on Sunday afternoons and sit on the steps of her front porch, the larger ones standing in line on the ground, while she talked to them of spiritual things and taught them lessons from the Bible.
     At the close of the war, when losses were heavy, the plantation passed into the hands of Mr. Wirtzfielder, who owned it for a number of years, then sold it to Mr. Sam Walker. After Mr. Walker's death, it became the property of his daughter, Mrs. John Shinholser. Mr. Shinholser now owns the place.
     Mr. Whitaker rented the plantation, after it passed from his hands, and lived there until his death. He was married three times and reared two sons and three daughters: the late William Whitaker was his elder son; the younger son was Dr. James M. Whitaker, for many years on the staff of physicians of the State Sanitarium. The three daughters were Mrs. Elbert Bivins, Mrs. H. D. Allen and Mrs. O. M. Cone.14,15
The Whitaker Place
Death*17 August 1821 He died at Milledgeville, Baldwin Co., Georgia, on 17 August 1821
The Georgia Journal, August 21, 1821:
Died in Baldwin County at William Rutherford's in the 67th year of his age, Major Francis Boykin on the 18th instant [18 Aug 1821]. His life furnished an example of that steadfastness of habit which should characterize the Christian walk of all professors of religion. In self-denial particularly, he gave evidence of his having soared superior to the natural man and whilst most of the world are engaged in defending their actions with the coloring of words and correcting the misconceptions of others respecting themselves, he hath remained the same silent and cross-bearing personage, seemingly well convinced that error corrects itself, while merit gains its own reward.16 
Burial*after 17 August 1821 His body was interred after 17 August 1821 at Samuel Boykin Family Cemetery, Milledgeville, Baldwin Co., Georgia. Directions:
From the Baldwin Co Courthouse, go east on Hancock St and follow highways 22/24 SE for 4.4 miles. At the split of 22 and 24, bear right on 24. Go about 7.6 miles on Highway 24 to the old Torrance homeplace on your right (approx. 901 Hwy 24 East). If not blocked by a locked gate, go down the driveway to your right and go for about 1/2 mile or 2600 feet. The drive goes past a grove of pecan trees and the old home place. The cemetery is located to your right and beside a field road that turns off to the right. The cemetery is surrounded by a wrought iron fence.
     If access is not available through the old Torrance home place above, an alternate is to go down the previous driveway at the Meeks property. Go 0.4 mile on the gravel-covered driveway into the Meeks property to a gate on the left. Turn left through the gate and go 0.1 mile on a field road to an opening in the fence. The small cemetery is in the field to your front left about 200 feet from the fence opening. It is enclosed in a wrought iron fence under a chinaberry tree.
     GPS coordinates: 32 59' 29.5" N 83 05' 09.9" W
     The gravestone for "Major Francis B. Boykin, S.C. Mil., Rev. War" is the only one in the cemetery. Some letters of the gravestone are missing, but some of the impressions remain readable.
     Photographs of cemtery and gravestone will be found on the website for Friends of Baldwin Cemeteries, Inc.. See: http://www.friendsofcems.org/Baldwin/.17 
Biography* From "Oconee River Tales to Tell"
     Settlements along the east bank of the Oconee River, on land that was to become Baldwin, were in Washington County from its founding in 1784, with the Oconee as the western frontier, until Baldwin County was organized in 1803. The first federal fort was built at the Rock Landing site in 1789, at the head of navigation of the Oconee River. Federaltown grew around the fort.
     This first white settlement contained fifteen houses-four framed, the others log cabins. A peltry warehouse was built to handle the skins and furs sent down river by pole boats to Darien. From there these were reloaded for shipment to Philadelphia, New York, and Europe. Rock Landing had long been the junction for several Indian trading paths. Because of several shoals, for another score of years, and after many efforts on the part of the Georgia Legislature and private enterprise, shipping would continue from the Rock Landing boat docks, before it was possible for boats to navigate the Oconee River or to land nearer Milledgeville.
     A tobacco warehouse and inspection station was also located at Federaltown. John McKinzie was granted a license by the Georgia Legislature to operate this. One of the first ferries across the Oconee was operated by Aaron McKinzie.
     Federaltown proved an unhealthy site. Several deaths resulted from sickness. The garrison was moved to a new fort built higher up the Oconee. Fort Fidius, completed in 1793, was located two miles below Fishing Creek. Col. Henry Gaither was made commander of what became the largest garrison south of the Ohio River. The raids of the Creeks in the Oconee War were so frequent and violent that the Georgia Legislature raised militia to strengthen the federal forces….
     The path also crossed the upper comer of Elijah Clarke's bounty warrant grant of fifteen hundred acres, immediately below Dysart's land. Clarke's land east of the Oconee was only a portion of the grant awarded him for his invaluable service to Georgia in the American Revolution. His larger tract lay on the west side of the Oconee, as did his son John's grant. Because the Treaty of New York, in 1790, invalidated the previously made Georgia-Creek treaties, the Georgia Legislature was unable to fulfill their commitment to pay the Clarkes and hundreds of other veterans with land.
     Elijah Clarke never cultivated or lived on this land. When not in active service for his state and fellow Georgians, he continued to live in Wilkes County. This tract of Washington County, later east Baldwin County land, was sold and likely purchased to be incorporated into the vastholdings of the Boykin-Whitaker and eventually Shinholser estates, to become the property known as Indian Island Farm and Ranch.
     Three interrelated families, the Boykins, Canteys, and Whitakers, came from the Carolinas in 1785 to take up the bounty warrant grants given them as American Revolution veterans in 1785. They each had sizeable tracts bounded by the Oconee River on the southwest and on the southeast by an island Immediately they purchased additional land and continued to add to their holdings whenever any vacant land became available. Part of Boykin's land had originally been a Head-Right Grant of 287.5 acres to Samuel Bloodworth. Boykin soon acquired all the land between Gum Creek and Town Creek until he owned 2886 acres.
     Major Francis Boykin and Captain James Cantey were from Camden, South Carolina. Ensign Hudson Whitaker was from Halifax County, North Carolina. Boykin was married to Catherine Whitaker and Cantey was married to Martha Whitaker. Hudson Whitaker's son William married Mary Cantey. All the families became extensive planters. Their joint holdings were ten to twelve miles below present-day Milledgeville, off Georgia Highway 24 to Sandersville.
     Boykin was appointed an Oconee River commissioner with supervisory responsibility for improving navigation. All people living within five miles of the river were required to work five days a year on the shoals, rocks, and fallen trees that might impede river navigation. Permission must be obtained to build dams for fish traps or to build a grist mill along the river.
     Boykin's son Samuel studied medicine and practiced his profession in Milledgeville. When his father died, he returned to the plantation and became an equally successful scientific farmer. On most of his acreage he grew corn and cotton, but his interest in sugar cane made him the first farmer in the region to succeed in its production. His cotton gin was also the first in operation in the area.
     Samuel Boykin built the imposing two-story white classical-revival home known in his time as "Me White House," because then it was the only white house in the vicinity. Later, this home came to be called "Boykin Hall.
     John Linley, in "Architecture of Middle Georgia: The Oconee Area", wrote that certain characteristics of the house, such as the fan in the pediment, can be attributed to Daniel Pratt as the architect. The wood and plaster work of the house are particularly noteworthy. The half-mile tree-lined drive approaching the house made it an impressive sight to guests, and to the stagecoach riders who stopped there when this was a relay station.
     A later generation of owners built a new modern house. For some years "Boykin Hall" stood unoccupied and suffered neglect and deterioration, but it has endured more than a century and a half. In more recent years, a subsequent owner has made restorations.
     Dr. Samuel Boykin followed the western migration movement, first to Columbus in 1836, later to Alabama. When Boykin left east Baldwin, William Whitaker bought the nearly three thousand acres, adding it to his adjacent holdings. The Whitakers moved into Boykin Hall. The merged plantations remained Whitaker land until after the Civil War. It is on this land, later known as Shinholser Indian Island Farm and Ranch, that the "Shinholser Prehistoric Earth Mounds" are located.
     Mary Cantey Whitaker, wife of William, was remembered for holding Sunday School classes on the "Boykin Hall" front porch for the children of the plantation slaves….18
 

Family

Catherine Whitaker (say 1748 - after 1800)
Children
Last Edited27 February 2016

Citations

  1. David Robert Wooten et al., We All Became Forefathers: Genealogies of the Wooten, Boykin, Whitaker and Broadhurst Families, 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 929.273 W889.
  2. Bobby Gilmer Moss, Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1983.
  3. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  4. Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas Jr., Index to the Headright and Bounty Grants of Georgia, 1756-1909, Vidalia, GA: Georgia Genealogical Reprints, 1970.
    Cites Book III, page 462.
  5. Albert M. Hillhouse, History of Burke Co., GA, Magnolia Press, Swainsboro, GA, 1985, Repository: Georgia Historical Society Library in Savannah, Call No. F292.B95 H535 1985.
    Page 313.
  6. Brent Howard Holcomb, Kershaw Co., SC: Minutes of the County Court, 1791-1799, , Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.761 P2h.
    pages 3, 13, 19, 26,50, 52, 63, 72, 80, 81, 88, 91, 100, 108, 109, 115 and 121.
  7. E-mail written 22 Aug 2007 to Warren Culpepper from Catherine Reuther (A Terry family researcher), Atlanta, GA, e-mail address.
    Typed transcription of the transcription of the will sent to Catherine Reuther by the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia, SC, in 2007 Kershaw County Wills.
  8. Anna Maria Green Cook, compiler, History of Baldwin County, Georgia, Anderson, South Carolina: Keys-Hearn, 1925, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8573 H2c.
  9. Virginia S. and Ralph V. Wood, 1805 Georgia Land Lottery, Greenwood Press, Cambridge, 1964, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8 R2WY 1805.
    page 35.
  10. Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas Jr., Index to the Headright and Bounty Grants of Georgia, 1756-1909, Vidalia, GA: Georgia Genealogical Reprints, 1970.
    Cites Book G.5, page 438.
  11. Frances T. Ingmire, Baldwin Co., GA 1813 Tax List, page 2:
    Francis Boykin, Brown's District
    James Boykin, Brown's District
    Samuel Boykin, 1 Poll.
  12. Georgia Journal, 1819-1823.
  13. 1820 Federal Census, United States.
    page 34; Ancestry.com image 9 of 17.
  14. Anna Maria Green Cook, History of Baldwin County
    , Anderson, SC: Kays-Hearn, 1925 (Pages 115-117).
    Article by Mrs. O. M. Cone, 1925, Pages 476-478.
  15. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
    photo by Warren Culpepper, 2015.
  16. Tad Evans, compiler, Milledgeville, Georgia, Newspaper Clippings: Southern Recorder, 1820-1827, Vol. I, Savannah, GA: T. Evans, 1995, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8573/M1 B3e v. 1.
    p. 78.
  17. Elizabeth L. Dawson et al., compiler, One Hundred Three Lost or Found Cemeteries of Baldwin County, Georgia, 1814-1999, Milledgeville, Georgia: Mary Vinson Memorial Library, 1999, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8573 V3d.
    p. 36.
  18. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Chapter 5: Oconee River Frontier Settlements: East Baldwin County While in Washington County", pages 53-57.

Francis Boykin1

M, (30 July 1825 - 11 August 1863)
FatherDr. Samuel Boykin (1786 - 29 Apr 1848)
MotherNarcissa Cooper (28 Apr 1803 - 14 Jun 1857)
Birth*30 July 1825 Francis was born at Baldwin Co., Georgia, on 30 July 1825. Birthplace assumed from father's known residence.2 
(Family Member) Relocation1836 He, as a family member, accompanied Dr. Samuel Boykin in relocating in 1836 at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia,3 
(free wh male 05-10) 1840 Census1 June 1840 Francis and Samuel was probably a free white male, age 5 and under 10,in Dr. Samuel Boykin's household, on the 1840 Census on 1 June 1840 at Muscogee Co., Georgia.4 
(Executor) Will28 April 1848 Narcissa, Francis, Samuel and Mark named as executor(s) in the will of Dr. Samuel Boykin at Muscogee Co., Georgia, on 28 April 1848.5 
Marriage*24 November 1849 He married Laura A. Nucholls on 24 November 1849 at age 24.2 
Death*11 August 1863 He died on 11 August 1863 at age 38. 
Burial*after 11 August 1863 His body was interred after 11 August 1863 at Barbour Co., Alabama
Biography* No children. Died during the war; research needed to see if he fought and died in it. 

Family

Laura A. Nucholls (say 1828 - )
Last Edited4 December 2002

Citations

  1. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
  2. Mrs. Bun Wylie -- State Regent 1930-32, Boykin Family Bible (Given to Emily Boykin Tichenor on 16 Apr 1861 by Sam and Laura Boykin), Transcription contained in "Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters, DAR, Vol. IV Old Bible Records and Land Lotteries, 1932.
  3. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Chapter 5, pp 53-57.
  4. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Ancestry.com image.
  5. Muscogee Co., GA Court of Probate Records. Transcribed by Warren Culpepper from photocopy by Mrs. Eugene Millsaps III.

Rev. Samuel Boykin Jr.1

M, (24 November 1829 - 3 November 1899)
FatherDr. Samuel Boykin (1786 - 29 Apr 1848)
MotherNarcissa Cooper (28 Apr 1803 - 14 Jun 1857)
Birth*24 November 1829 Samuel was born at Baldwin Co., Georgia, on 24 November 1829. Birthplace assumed from father's known residence.2 
(Family Member) Relocation1836 He, as a family member, accompanied Dr. Samuel Boykin in relocating in 1836 at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia,3 
(free wh male 05-10) 1840 Census1 June 1840 Francis and Samuel was probably a free white male, age 5 and under 10,in Dr. Samuel Boykin's household, on the 1840 Census on 1 June 1840 at Muscogee Co., Georgia.4 
(Executor) Will28 April 1848 Narcissa, Francis, Samuel and Mark named as executor(s) in the will of Dr. Samuel Boykin at Muscogee Co., Georgia, on 28 April 1848.5 
(Household member) 1850 Census1 June 1850 Thomas, Samuel, Emily, Narcissa, LeRoy, Emily and Harriet was listed as a household member living with Narcissa Cooper on the 1850 Census at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia.6 
Marriage*10 May 1853 He married Laura Josephine Nisbet at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia, on 10 May 1853 at age 23. (Bible transcription actually gives year as 1855, but that date would be out of sequence and 1853 appears more likely.)2 
1880 Census*1 June 1880 Samuel was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Macon, Bibb Co., Georgia.7 
Death*3 November 1899 He died at Nashville, Davidson Co., Tennessee, on 3 November 1899 at age 69.2 
Burial*circa 7 November 1899 His body was interred circa 7 November 1899 at Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Bibb Co., Georgia. Lot 21, Block 1, Forest Hill Section.8 
Biography* From "Dictionary of Georgia Biography"

BOYKIN, SAMUEL. Editor, historian, clergyman. Born Milledgeville, Ga., 24 November 1829; died Nashville, Tenn., 3 November 1899. Son of Samuel and Narcissa Cooper Boykin. Married Laura Nisbett, 10 May 1865. Children: Laura (or Laurette) N. and Eugenia N. Education: University of Georgia, B.A. (1851), M.A. (1854). Honorary degree: Mercer University, D. D. (1880).

The son of a well-to-do physician-planter, Samuel Boykin was educated in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Georgia. While a student at the University of Georgia he joined a Baptist church. After nearly a year of foreign travel following graduation from college, he farmed in Alabama and Florida (1852-60).

From 1860 to 1865 he was editor and usually owner of the Christian Index, a Georgia Baptist weekly newspaper published then in Macon. As might be expected, his editorial policy vigorously favored the broad missionary and educational activities of organized Georgia and Southern Baptist life, slavery, and the Confederacy-and just as vigorously attacked Lincoln and his administration.

Much more decisive to the remainder of Boykin's life, and to his impact on Georgia and southern life, was his founding in 1862 of the Child's Index, a Sunday-school paper that he prepared and published. After a brief break it was resumed in 1866 as the Child's Delight, becoming widely appreciated within the Baptist denomination. He sold it to the first Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention in 1870, moved to Memphis the following year as its editor (it had been merged with a Tennessee publication as Kind Words and Child's Delight), and returned to Macon in 1874 as its editor after it came under the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. When the second Sunday School Board assumed its control in 1891, he went to Nashville, Tenn., where he spent the remainder of his life as the editor of this and other Sunday-school quarterlies. In this connection he has been described as "almost the chief pioneer and genius in making Sunday school literature for the Baptists of the South."

On the Georgia scene, Boykin's influence was temporary as editor of the Christian Index (1860-65) and as pastor of the Second Baptist Church, Macon (1870). More lasting was his work as editor or coeditor of the memoirs of Howell Cobb and Adiel Sherwood. Most enduring of all his literary labors has been his massive History of the Baptist Denomination in Georgia, with Biographical Compendium and Portrait Gallery of Baptist Ministers and Other Georgia Baptists (1881). That it is now available in a 1977 reprint attests to its merit. In his prime, Boykin was described as quick, impulsive, nervous, and sometimes abruptbut also capable of astonishingly long periods of concentration and writing. He was firm in purpose and resolute in action. Widely appreciated were his humor, wit, and repartee, "without any admixture of coarse or vulgar elements." Warmhearted and generous, he was affectionate, considerate, and thoughtful. Boykin is buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Ga.9

 
Biography From “History of Baldwin County”

Samuel Boykin (Sr.) was descended from Edward Boykin, who immigrated from Caernarvonshire, Wales, and settled in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. Edward Boykin had a son, William Boykin, who died in 1731, leaving a son, William, who moved to South Carolina in 1755 or 1756, and settled in Kershaw county six miles south of Camden. The third son of the last mentioned, Francis Boykin, was a Lieutenant of cavalry in the army at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. He moved to Baldwin county in 1800, and died in 1821. He married Catherine Whitaker and his remains now rest on the plantation of S. E. Whitaker, ten miles from Milledgeville. He left two sons and a daughter. Dr. Samuel Boykin was his eldest son, and James Boykin, a deacon of the Milledgeville church, his youngest. His daughter, Eliza, married the father of Prof. Williams Rutherford of Athens, Georgia.

Dr. S. Boykin, the father of Samuel, graduated at the University of Georgia, 1807, and then attended lectures at the Pennsylvania Medical College, Philadelphia. He was an active, popular, and successful practitioner in Milledgeville, and in a few years accumulated quite a large property.

Samuel was born in Milledgeville, Nov. 24, 1829. He attended school in Columbus, and also at Westchester, Penn., and at Bridgeport, Conn. He was converted in 1847, at a meeting conducted by Rev. Elbert Williams, the pastor at Columbus, and John E. Dawson, but formed no ecclesiastical relations until two years later while a student at Athens, where he joined the church, and was baptized by Rev. S. Landrum, the pastor. He graduated at the State University in 1851, after which he traveled in Europe for six months. He married on May 10, 1863, Miss Laura Nisbet of Macon, Georgia. The degree of Master of Arts was conferred on him by the State University in 1854, and in 1860, he was elected editor of the Christian Index, then owned by the Georgia Baptist Convention and published at Macon. He was for many years editor of the Sunday School paper "Kind Words." He is also the author of Memoirs of Hon. Howell Cobb, a work of great value, alike creditable to the head and the heart of the author, and worthy of the high character of the subject. He was a man of decided convictions; of firm purpose and resolute in action, while at the same time he had that true simplicity of character which worldly associations never impair.
 

Family

Laura Josephine Nisbet (4 March 1834 - 25 March 1900)
Children
Last Edited29 September 2003

Citations

  1. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
  2. Mrs. Bun Wylie -- State Regent 1930-32, Boykin Family Bible (Given to Emily Boykin Tichenor on 16 Apr 1861 by Sam and Laura Boykin), Transcription contained in "Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters, DAR, Vol. IV Old Bible Records and Land Lotteries, 1932.
  3. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Chapter 5, pp 53-57.
  4. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Ancestry.com image.
  5. Muscogee Co., GA Court of Probate Records. Transcribed by Warren Culpepper from photocopy by Mrs. Eugene Millsaps III.
  6. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    pages 338 and 339, Ancestry.com images 87 & 89
    Mrs. Narcissa Boykin, 47, F, GA
    Samuel Boykin, 20, M, GA
    Emily C. Boykin, 18, F, GA
    Narcissa Boykin, 16, F, GA
    Eliza H. Boykin, 12, F, GA
    Leroy Boykin, 10, M, GA
    Lula Boykin, 4, F, GA
    Thomas C. Boykin, 14, M, GA (separated from rest of family and listed at very end of census).
  7. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    3rd Ward, Maco, Bibb Co., GA, page 225D
    Samuel BOYKIN Self M Male W 57 GA Minister & Editor GA SC
    Laura BOYKIN Wife M Female W 46 GA Keeping House GA GA
    Laura N. BOYKIN Dau S Female W 13 GA At School GA GA
    Eugenia N. BOYKIN Dau S Female W 5 GA At Home GA GA
    Henry WRIGHT BroL M Male W 43 AL Physician LA LA
    Mary N. WRIGHT Sister M Female W 42 GA At Home GA GA
    Fitzallin B. WRIGHT Niece S Female W 13 GA At School GA GA
    C. Randolph WRIGHT Nephew S Male W 12 GA At School GA GA
    Eugenius N. WRIGHT Nephew S Male W 6 GA At Home GA GA
    Leila WRIGHT Sister W Female W 34 GA At Home GA GA
    Eugenius NISBET Nephew S Male W 18 GA Student GA GA
    Eugenius NISBET Nephew S Male W 19 GA Clerk GA GA
    Pleasent JOHNSON Other M Female B 31 GA Servant GA GA
    Georgia WHITE Other S Female B 39 GA Servant GA GA
    Georgia PARKER Other S Female B 21 GA Servant GA GA
    William RUSSEL Other S Male B 36 GA Servant GA GA.
  8. Record of burials for Rose Hill Cemetery compiled by the Engineer's Office, City of Macon, GA. Submitted by Pattie Causey e-mail address: "In Lot 21, Block 1, Forest Hill Section: Laura Josephine Nisbet Boykin, Laurette Nisbet Boykin and Samuel Boykin."
  9. Kenneth Coleman and Charles Stephen Gurr, Dictionary of Georgia Biography, University of Georgia Press, 1983.
    pp. 107-108.

Emily Catherine Boykin1

F, (16 April 1832 - 7 September 1864)
FatherDr. Samuel Boykin (1786 - 29 Apr 1848)
MotherNarcissa Cooper (28 Apr 1803 - 14 Jun 1857)
Birth*16 April 1832 Emily was born at Baldwin Co., Georgia, on 16 April 1832. Birthplace assumed from father's known residence.2 
(Family Member) Relocation1836 She, as a family member, accompanied Dr. Samuel Boykin in relocating in 1836 at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia,3 
(Household member) 1850 Census1 June 1850 Thomas, Samuel, Emily, Narcissa, LeRoy, Emily and Harriet was listed as a household member living with Narcissa Cooper on the 1850 Census at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia.4 
Married Name16 April 1861  As of 16 April 1861, her married name was Tichenor.5 
Marriage*16 April 1861 She married Dr. Isaac Taylor Tichenor on 16 April 1861 at age 29.5,2 
Death*7 September 1864 She died at Union Springs, Bullock Co., Alabama, on 7 September 1864 at age 32.5 

Family

Dr. Isaac Taylor Tichenor (11 November 1825 - 2 December 1902)
Last Edited19 August 2002

Citations

  1. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
  2. Mrs. Bun Wylie -- State Regent 1930-32, Boykin Family Bible (Given to Emily Boykin Tichenor on 16 Apr 1861 by Sam and Laura Boykin), Transcription contained in "Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters, DAR, Vol. IV Old Bible Records and Land Lotteries, 1932.
  3. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Chapter 5, pp 53-57.
  4. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    pages 338 and 339, Ancestry.com images 87 & 89
    Mrs. Narcissa Boykin, 47, F, GA
    Samuel Boykin, 20, M, GA
    Emily C. Boykin, 18, F, GA
    Narcissa Boykin, 16, F, GA
    Eliza H. Boykin, 12, F, GA
    Leroy Boykin, 10, M, GA
    Lula Boykin, 4, F, GA
    Thomas C. Boykin, 14, M, GA (separated from rest of family and listed at very end of census).
  5. Boykin Family Papers, Collected by Eleanor Boykin (#9929) and given to Warren Culpepper, 1983.

Narcissa Boykin1

F, (14 December 1833 - 1912)
FatherDr. Samuel Boykin (1786 - 29 Apr 1848)
MotherNarcissa Cooper (28 Apr 1803 - 14 Jun 1857)
Birth*14 December 1833 Narcissa was born at Baldwin Co., Georgia, on 14 December 1833. Birthplace assumed from father's known residence.2 
(Family Member) Relocation1836 She, as a family member, accompanied Dr. Samuel Boykin in relocating in 1836 at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia,3 
(free wh female 05-10) 1840 Census1 June 1840 Harriet and Narcissa was probably a free white female, age 5 and under 10, in Dr. Samuel Boykin's household, on the 1840 Census on 1 June 1840 at Muscogee Co., Georgia.4 
(Household member) 1850 Census1 June 1850 Thomas, Samuel, Emily, Narcissa, LeRoy, Emily and Harriet was listed as a household member living with Narcissa Cooper on the 1850 Census at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia.5 
Married Name14 October 1854  As of 14 October 1854, her married name was Holt.1 
Marriage*14 December 1854 She married Thadeus Goode Holt on 14 December 1854 at age 21.1,2 
(Wife) 1880 Census1880 Narcissa was listed as Thadeus Goode Holt's wife on the 1880 Census at Tylers-Helena-Elliotsville, Shelby Co., Alabama.6 
Death*1912 She died at Atlanta, Fulton Co., Georgia, in 1912.2 

Family

Thadeus Goode Holt (25 November 1825 - 1898)
Child
Last Edited19 August 2002

Citations

  1. Boykin Family Papers, Collected by Eleanor Boykin (#9929) and given to Warren Culpepper, 1983.
  2. Mrs. Bun Wylie -- State Regent 1930-32, Boykin Family Bible (Given to Emily Boykin Tichenor on 16 Apr 1861 by Sam and Laura Boykin), Transcription contained in "Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters, DAR, Vol. IV Old Bible Records and Land Lotteries, 1932.
  3. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Chapter 5, pp 53-57.
  4. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Ancestry.com image.
  5. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    pages 338 and 339, Ancestry.com images 87 & 89
    Mrs. Narcissa Boykin, 47, F, GA
    Samuel Boykin, 20, M, GA
    Emily C. Boykin, 18, F, GA
    Narcissa Boykin, 16, F, GA
    Eliza H. Boykin, 12, F, GA
    Leroy Boykin, 10, M, GA
    Lula Boykin, 4, F, GA
    Thomas C. Boykin, 14, M, GA (separated from rest of family and listed at very end of census).
  6. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    Tylers, Helena And Elliottsville, Shelby Co., Alabama, page 250B
    Thadius G. HOLT Self M Male W 51 GA GA GA Lime Manufacturer
    Narcissa HOLT Wife M Female W 45 GA SC GA Keeping House
    Lee HOLT Son S Male W 21 GA GA GA At Home
    Bell BOYKIN Niece S Female W 5 AL GA GA
    Hanah JONES Other S Female B 18 AL AL AL Servant Cook
    John L. CLARK Other S Male W 18 TN TN TN Tely Operator
    William BANKLY Other S Male B 9 AL AL AL Servant.

William Boykin II

M, (before 1710 - circa 1784)
FatherWilliam Boykin I (s 1680 - 19 Jun 1731)
Mother(?) Burwell (s 1682 - )
Birth*before 1710 William was born at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, before 1710. 
(Heir) Will19 June 1731 William, John, Thomas, Simon and Martha named as heir(s) in the will of William Boykin I at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, on 19 June 1731.1 
Marriage*say 1734 He married Elizabeth Bryant say 1734. 
Biography*say 1755 Received grants of land from the British Crown on Town Creek, Swift Creek and the Wateree River, near Camden, in Craven Co. (later to become Kershaw Co.), SC. 
Relocation*circa 1755 He relocated circa 1755 at Craven Co., South Carolina; from Southampton Co., VA2 
Death*circa 1784 He died at Camden, Camden District, South Carolina, circa 1784. 

Family

Elizabeth Bryant (say 1712 - )
Children
Last Edited5 January 2003

Citations

  1. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
    Cites: Wills of Isle of Wight Co., VA, Book 3, p 321-22.
  2. David Robert Wooten et al., We All Became Forefathers: Genealogies of the Wooten, Boykin, Whitaker and Broadhurst Families, 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 929.273 W889.
  3. David Robert Wooten et al., We All Became Forefathers: Genealogies of the Wooten, Boykin, Whitaker and Broadhurst Families, 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 929.273 W889.
    p. 52.
  4. Forrest Clark Johnson III, editor, A History of LaGrange, Georgia, 1828-1900, Vols. I & III, LaGrange, Georgia: Family Tree, 1980, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8463 H2j v. 1,3.
    pp 170-172.
  5. David Robert Wooten et al., We All Became Forefathers: Genealogies of the Wooten, Boykin, Whitaker and Broadhurst Families, 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 929.273 W889.
    p. 53.
  6. David Robert Wooten et al., We All Became Forefathers: Genealogies of the Wooten, Boykin, Whitaker and Broadhurst Families, 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 929.273 W889.
    p. 54.

Elizabeth Bryant

F, (say 1712 - )
Ancestry Unknown* Information about the ancestry and siblings of Elizabeth Bryant is wanted. See page footer for contact information. 
Birth*say 1712 Elizabeth was born at Chowan Precinct, North Carolina, say 1712. 
Marriage*say 1734 She married William Boykin II say 1734. 
Married Namesay 1734  As of say 1734, her married name was Boykin. 
Death* She died at Camden, Camden District, South Carolina
(Family Member) Relocationcirca 1755 She, as a family member, accompanied William Boykin II in relocating circa 1755 at Craven Co., South Carolina; from Southampton Co., VA1 

Family

William Boykin II (before 1710 - circa 1784)
Children
Last Edited15 December 2007

Citations

  1. David Robert Wooten et al., We All Became Forefathers: Genealogies of the Wooten, Boykin, Whitaker and Broadhurst Families, 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 929.273 W889.
  2. David Robert Wooten et al., We All Became Forefathers: Genealogies of the Wooten, Boykin, Whitaker and Broadhurst Families, 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 929.273 W889.
    p. 52.
  3. Forrest Clark Johnson III, editor, A History of LaGrange, Georgia, 1828-1900, Vols. I & III, LaGrange, Georgia: Family Tree, 1980, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8463 H2j v. 1,3.
    pp 170-172.
  4. David Robert Wooten et al., We All Became Forefathers: Genealogies of the Wooten, Boykin, Whitaker and Broadhurst Families, 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 929.273 W889.
    p. 53.
  5. David Robert Wooten et al., We All Became Forefathers: Genealogies of the Wooten, Boykin, Whitaker and Broadhurst Families, 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 929.273 W889.
    p. 54.

Edward Boykin

M, (say 1650 - 27 May 1728)
Ancestry Unknown* Information about the ancestry and siblings of Edward Boykin is wanted. See page footer for contact information. 
Birth*say 1650 Edward was born at England say 1650. Ewen, his "Surnames" in England, lists among the a taxpayers in Huntingdonshire one John Boykyn in 1327 (p. 164). This "Joh'n" abbreviation could be meant for "Johann." and link the origin with Continental Europe. Raadt in his "Armories of Belgium, Luxembourg Allenayne," etc. gives the following reference [translated] to arms of Boykin....

"Godfridus Boiken, a gentleman of Bruxelles in 1286 was granted arms of which the shield had a chevron between ten billettes (letters or oblongs in heraldry) and which were arranged on the shield 2 & 1 in each upper corner, and 1, 2 & 1 in the lower portion (en pointe)." "L" is for legend and the cross illustrated is the sign used to indicate one in Foreign Service. "Brux" is abbreviation for Bruselles, -- or Bruxelles as spelled then. "Franco dixtus Boijken, echevin illec 1300" etc., means this Frank Boijken was also of the same stock, lived in 1300.

The records of co. Kent, England, refer to the Boykin family as yeomen (gentleman farmers who own small estates in land.) Before 1635, this family lived in Charing Cross, Kent, England.

However, some reseacrhers have said, without support, that Edward Boykin was born at Caernarvon in Wales.1 
Marriage*say 1675 He married Ann Gwaltney say 1675. Some early writers gave "Ann Marshall" as Edward Boykin's wife without any proof, whereas his wife was evidently a daughter of William Gwaltney, Sr., who made his will in Surry, March 28, 1728, same probated March 2, 1732. (WB 8-257) (See H. S. F. Vol. II, p. 116) Wm. Gwaltney gave his "Grandson Edward Boykin, one cow". This was Edward Boykin, Jr., who returned an account of the estate of his father, Edward Boykin, March 1730/31 in Isle of Wight. (C 11-51).1 
Will4 January 1725/26 He made a will at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, on 4 January 1725/26. In the name of God, Amen. I, Edward Boykin, being sick and weak of Body, but of perfect sense and memory, thanks be given to Almighty God, do make this my last Will and Testament.
     First principaley, I bequeath my Soul into the hands of Almighty God and my Body I commit to the Ground and as for my personall Estate which it hath pleased God to bestow upon me, I give and bequeath as followeth:
     Item: I give unto my loving son John Boykin the plantation whereon I now live and all land thereto belonging being five hundred and thirty acres... my said son and his Heirs forever.
     Item: I give unto my Loving Wife Ann Boykin Two Negros by name James and Luke and after my said wife's Decease I give the said Two Negros James and Luke to my Loving son John Boykin and his Heirs lawfully Begotten of his Body forever.
     Item. I give unto my Son John Boykin Two feather beds which he has in his own possession Already and to his heirs forever.
     And all the rest of my Estate Goods and Chattels wherever I give unto my Loving Wife Ann Boykin During her Natural Life, and at her Death it is my wish that it be equally divided among all my children and
     Lastly I do appoint my Loving wife Ann Boykin and my son John Boykin my whole and Sole Executors of this my Last Will and Testament revoking Disannulling and making Void all other Wills heretofore made by me.
     In Witness whereof I have hereunto put my hand and seal this 4 day of January 1725/6. Edward (x) Boykin (seal)
Signed Sealed and Declared in presence of James Atkinsson, Mary (x) Atkinsson, John Dunkley.2 
Probate*27 May 1728 Probate action was taken on Edward's estate on 27 May 1728 at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia,

At Court held for Isle of Wight Couty the 27th day of May 1728. The Last Will and Testament of Edward Boykin, deceased was proved in Court by John Boykin, one of the Execs therin named who made oath hereto and being proved by the oath of the Winessss hereto is admitted for record
Test. James Ingls, Clerk of Court.2
 
Death*27 May 1728 He died at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, on 27 May 1728. 
Biography Edward Boykin settled in Blackwater country of Virginia. He was granted in 1685, 525 acres of land by Francis, Lord Howard, Governor of Virginia, ion Isle of Wight Co., "for the transportation of eleven persons into the colony, etc. April 20, 1685"(p.580, 17th Cent. I. of W. Co., Va.) In 1678 before his grant, he owned land. July 3, 1678 Edward Boykin and James Manning had land adjoining that of Nicholas Cobb, who sold Thomas Tooke land adjacent to Edward Boykin. "In 1704, he had one thousand, one hundred acres (Va. Co. Rec. Isle of Wight Co.) "In 1713-one hundred acres, in 1714 one hundred and sixty acres. In 1715 one hundred and forty acres." (The Planter of Col. Va. by Baker, p.195) The records of I. of W. Co. in the Will and Appraisement of Edward Boykin, died April or May 1728, Will dated Jan. 4, 1725-6-Probated May 2 1728. In various deeds he refers to sons William and Thomas. John refers to his brother Edward Boykin Jr., who was executor of his (John) estate.
     Jan. 23, 1690, Edward Boykin had land grant from Nathaniel Bacon for transportation of four persons, one hundred and sixty-two acres-p.605. Arthur Allen sells to Edward Boykin 525 acres at Blackwater, Aug. 9, 1692-p.649 17th Cent. I. of W. Co.-Brodie. Again in Feb. 5, 1702, Arthur Allen of Lawnes' Creek Parish, Surry Co., sells to Edward Boykin, Upper Parish of I. of W. Co., Va. one half or 800 acres Blackwater Swamp. St. Lukes' Parish, Reg. Newport Parish Vestry Book-1724-from Clerk of I. of W. Co., Va. Between Edward Boykin-dated Jan. 7, 1723 and Is. Adkinson. Between Edward Boykin and William Kinchin. Between Richard Jackson and Edward Boykin. In Brodie C. of I. Edward Boykin appraised by Francis Williamson, John Dunkley, Mathew Kinchin. Ordered Feb. 24, 1728-R-Sept. 28, 1730.
     In list of Her Majesty Quick Rents in I. of W. Co., in the year 1704, "Edward Boykin-1100 acres"-Va. Hist. Mag. p.29, Vol. 337. I. of W. Co., Va. p. 10 Quit Rents of Virginia p. 64, Book 1-1647-1800 I. of W. Co. Wills & Ad-Ed Boykin appraised estate of John Turner, in 1705-p. 39, Book 2-Ed. Boykin witnessed 1728 will of Thomas Jordan. Book 25, p. 85 John Stevenson mentions land bought of Ed. Boykin, Feb. 24, 1728.1 
Biography* Edward Boykin was a land owner in Isle of Wight Co. in 1678, for on July 3, 1678, Nicholas Cobb sold Thomas Tooke land adjacent to James Manning and Edward Boykin. (17c - 580). He patented 520 acres on the Blackwater in 1685 and Arthur Allen sold him 525 acres at Blackwater Aug. 9, 1692 (Id. - 607). Also Arthur Allen of "Lawnes Creek Parish, Surry Co.", on Feb. 5, 1702, sold to Edward Boykin "of the Upper Parish of Isle of Wight one half of 800 acres of land granted to said Arthur Allen and Wm. Edwarde, late of James City". (Id 649) Edward Boykin held 1100 acres of land in the Quit Rents of 1704 (Id 698).3 

Family

Ann Gwaltney (say 1652 - circa 1727)
Children
Last Edited15 December 2007

Citations

  1. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
  2. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
    Copied from original will, recorded in Book 3, Isle of Wight Co, VA page 98.
  3. "Boykin of Isle of Wight," Historical Southern Families, Vol. IIIFTM CD191.

Ann Gwaltney

F, (say 1652 - circa 1727)
Birth*say 1652 Ann was born at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, say 1652. Ann was the daughter of William Gwaltney and Alice Flake, daughter of Robert Flake and his wife Margaret Marriott, grandaughter of Thomas Warren, of the famous "Warren House" of Surry. (See V.H.G.1
Marriage*say 1675 She married Edward Boykin say 1675. Some early writers gave "Ann Marshall" as Edward Boykin's wife without any proof, whereas his wife was evidently a daughter of William Gwaltney, Sr., who made his will in Surry, March 28, 1728, same probated March 2, 1732. (WB 8-257) (See H. S. F. Vol. II, p. 116) Wm. Gwaltney gave his "Grandson Edward Boykin, one cow". This was Edward Boykin, Jr., who returned an account of the estate of his father, Edward Boykin, March 1730/31 in Isle of Wight. (C 11-51).1 
Married Namesay 1675  As of say 1675, her married name was Boykin.1 
(Executor) Will4 January 1725/26 Ann named as executor(s) in the will of Edward Boykin at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, on 4 January 1725/26.2 
Death*circa 1727 She died circa 1727. 

Family

Edward Boykin (say 1650 - 27 May 1728)
Children
Last Edited23 January 2005

Citations

  1. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
  2. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
    Copied from original will, recorded in Book 3, Isle of Wight Co, VA page 98.

LeRoy Holt Boykin1

M, (28 March 1840 - )
FatherDr. Samuel Boykin (1786 - 29 Apr 1848)
MotherNarcissa Cooper (28 Apr 1803 - 14 Jun 1857)
Birth*28 March 1840 LeRoy was born at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia, on 28 March 1840. Birthplace assumed from father's known residence.2,3 
(Heir) Will28 April 1848 Thomas and LeRoy named as heir(s) in the will of Dr. Samuel Boykin at Muscogee Co., Georgia, on 28 April 1848.4 
(Household member) 1850 Census1 June 1850 Thomas, Samuel, Emily, Narcissa, LeRoy, Emily and Harriet was listed as a household member living with Narcissa Cooper on the 1850 Census at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia.5 
Marriage*13 February 1859 He married Laura Eloise Hunter on 13 February 1859 at age 18.2,3 
1880 Census*1880 LeRoy was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Fayette Co., Georgia

Family

Laura Eloise Hunter (say 1841 - )
Children
Last Edited4 December 2002

Citations

  1. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
  2. Boykin Family Papers, Collected by Eleanor Boykin (#9929) and given to Warren Culpepper, 1983.
  3. Mrs. Bun Wylie -- State Regent 1930-32, Boykin Family Bible (Given to Emily Boykin Tichenor on 16 Apr 1861 by Sam and Laura Boykin), Transcription contained in "Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters, DAR, Vol. IV Old Bible Records and Land Lotteries, 1932.
  4. Muscogee Co., GA Court of Probate Records. Transcribed by Warren Culpepper from photocopy by Mrs. Eugene Millsaps III.
  5. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    pages 338 and 339, Ancestry.com images 87 & 89
    Mrs. Narcissa Boykin, 47, F, GA
    Samuel Boykin, 20, M, GA
    Emily C. Boykin, 18, F, GA
    Narcissa Boykin, 16, F, GA
    Eliza H. Boykin, 12, F, GA
    Leroy Boykin, 10, M, GA
    Lula Boykin, 4, F, GA
    Thomas C. Boykin, 14, M, GA (separated from rest of family and listed at very end of census).

Judith Harvey

F, (say 1775 - )
FatherJames Harvey1 (1751 - c Oct 1807)
MotherSarah Judith Clarke (c 1758 - a 1813)
Birth*say 1775 Judith was born say 1775. 
Deed*14 December 1793 She granted a deed on 14 December 1793 at Greene Co., Georgia,

Book B, Page 372: 14th December 1793. James Harvey and Sarah, his wife, of Greene County to Edward Prince of Edgefield County, South Carolina for the sum of twenty shillings for a tract of land in Greene County on the waters of Twelve Mile Beaverdam and joining Tucker's land and by Bishop's land and Reid's land and by Sheffield's land. Said land containing four hundred acres, it being the same granted to said Harvey and dated 6th December 1792. Signed by James Harvey and Sary Harvey. Wit: John Lamar, J.P. and Jeremiah Clark.2
 
Married Name1797  As of 1797, her married name was Cooper. 
Marriage*1797 She married Thomas Cooper Jr. at Hancock Co., Georgia, in 1797. 
Deed*22 June 1801 She granted a deed on 22 June 1801 at Clarks Fork of Long Creek, Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Book UU, 1803-1804, p. 205, 22 June 1801, Thomas Cooper & Judith, his wife, of Hancock Co., Ga., to Thomas Wellborn of Wilkes Co., Ga., for $1260, 420 acres in Wilkes Co. on Clark Fork of Long Creek, adj. N.W. by Crews & Springer, N.E. by Robertson, S.F. & S.W. by vacant at time of original survey, being two tracts originally granted to James McLane, one 5 Aug. 1785, the other 23 Jan. 1799. (signed) Thomas Cooper, Judith Cooper. Wit: F. Tucker, J.P., Wm. Raburn, J.I.C. Rec. 14 Mar. 1804.3 
(Heir) Will16 January 1807 Sarah and Judith named as heir(s) in the will of James Harvey at Hancock Co., Georgia, on 16 January 1807.4 

Family

Thomas Cooper Jr. (1771 - 5 July 1843)
Children
Last Edited2 July 2004

Citations

  1. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Will of Thomas Cooper dated 29 May 1843 and probated 10 Jul 1843. Page 29: Cites Will Book B-page 178.
  2. Hancock Co., GA Deed Books 1794 - 1802, .
  3. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
  4. Hancock Co., GA Wills (1792-1842), DAR, 1950.
    Cites Book C (1803-1806), page 429.
  5. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    "Alexander's - Southside VA/NC, GA & AL"; contact: e-mail address.
  6. Kenneth Coleman and Charles Stephen Gurr, Dictionary of Georgia Biography, University of Georgia Press, 1983.
    pages 217-218.
  7. Dates are only estimated, but Clinton Cooper is believed to have died as an infant.

Captain Thomas Cooper

M, (1733 - before 13 February 1796)
Ancestry Unknown* Information about the ancestry and siblings of Captain Thomas Cooper is wanted. See page footer for contact information.
     On 14 Dec 2010, Martin Cooper wrote: "I have been trying for several years to prove the connection of Captain Thomas to my earliest proven Cooper ancestor, John (1742-1835), whom Sarah Edna Cooper Holtzclaw listed as a sibling of Captain Thomas. I do have some additional info on John, but nothing that connects him to Captain Thomas other than the Holtzclaw statement. Also, I have a very good book on the life of "Mark Anthony Cooper, the Iron Man of Georgia." It contains a lot of detail on the wife of Captain Thomas, Sarah Anthony. There is also an interesting article on the Coopers and Anthony's from the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, vol. 9."1 
Birth*1733 Thomas was born at Frederick Co., Virginia, in 1733. In The Family Record of John Cooper 1778-1909, privately published in 1909, Sarah Edna Cooper Holtzclaw states “In 1620, there was a corporate body of men formed in London, known as the London Company. They settled in Virginia, their object being to develop the country and to protect the English interests as well. Among the names of this corporation we find that of John Cooper, who, we think, is the ancestor of our family, as our family came from Virginia. The next Cooper we find is Thomas, Sr., who lived in Henry County, Virginia. We think Thomas Jr and John were his sons and probably James, William and Arthur as all lived in the same county.”.2,3 
Immigration1741 He immigrated in 1741 to Virginia
Marriage*8 January 1762 He married Sarah Anthony at Bedford Co., Virginia, on 8 January 1762. 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1783
(DAR Listing: Thomas Cooper, born circa 1733-35 in Virginia, died 13 Feb 1796 in Georgia, married Sarah Anthony, Patriotic Service, Virginia.)4 
Relocation*say 1790 He relocated say 1790 at Wilkes Co., Georgia, In his Story of Georgia, and Georgia People, George G. Smith wrote that many of the Hancock County settlers came from Mecklenberg and Rowan counties, in North Carolina, as well as from Virginia. Many of these lived in Jefferson and Burke counties before moving into the section of Washington County which later became Greene and Hancock. Smith wrote that there were two classes of people before 1800: (1) slave owners with a few Negroes and about four hundred acres, and (2) yeomen with two hundred acres and only his family for labor. The wealthier families cultivated their plantations in the county but built their homes in Sparta.
     Choice land in Hancock County was considered to be along the Oconee River and its tributaries, particularly Shoulderbone Creek. Fort Creek junctured with Shoulderbone very near where it junctured with the Oconee. Quite early Fort Twiggs was built in this vicinity to give protection to the settlers and to guard the ford where the Upper Trading Path of the Creeks crossed these creeks. This protection attracted additional settlers to the area. Pine Woods House Trading Store, built near the fort, became the hub of political and social activities for the area.
     Shoulderbone Creek is a long creek rising in Greene County, with numerous tributaries. The naming of Shoulderbone Creek is similar to the naming of Scull Shoals. Prehistoric earth mounds and an early Indian village and burial grounds were in close proximity. Spring floods through the years have continued to wash up human bones. In the early days, a human scapula and humerus bone were found against a rock in the creek, so the pioneer settlers called it Shoulderbone Creek. The county line established in 1793, when Hancock was cut off from Greene County, was just below Fosters' Stockade, a short distance from where Shoulderbone Creek enters the Oconee River.
     (A list of Hancock County settlers along the Oconee River tributaries and valley is then given, and included among them are Thomas Cooper and Mark A. Cooper.)
     All the settlers sought a desirable spot near a spring, and near a trail leading to civilization. As quickly as possible, trees were cut to clear land for a home and a patch for a food crop. The trees were used to build first a stockade for protection against the Indians, then a log cabin-many double, because most families were large in number with some sons old enough to help. Rails were split to fence around the patches. The livestock roamed in the grasslands and woodlands. Settlers helped each other accomplish these necessary tasks, while some were on constant watchful guard against the Indians.
     In the early years, farm crops were primarily for human and animal consumption. Food crops of corn, beans, and potatoes were planted. Also, a few rows of cotton were planted in the garden for personal household use. The seeds had to be tediously picked from the lint before spinning could be done. A herd of sheep provided the wool for most of the clothing and covering. Tobacco and indigo were planted for personal use and as cash crops. The indigo was used to make a blue dye. Tobacco had been the primary money crop on their Virginia and North Carolina farms and it would continue to be until after the War of 1812. Surpluses of both these crops were exported and the cash used for sugar, coffee, tools, medicine, and ammunition.
     Other sources of income were from their livestock and from timber….5 
Will*20 August 1793 He made a will at Greene Co., Georgia, on 20 August 1793

The Will of Thomas Cooper, Georgia, Hancock County.
In the name of God, Amen! I Thomas Cooper of Green County and State of Georgia being in perfect health and sound mind calling to mind the mortality of the body do make and constitute this my last will and testament.
First, - I give my soul to god who gave it to me, and my body to the grave to be decently buried in hopes of a resurection to eternal life through the merits of Jesus Christ.
I give to my loving wife Sarah Cooper one negro woman named Winney, one horse and saddle, one feather bed and furniture and two cows and calves to her and her heirs forever. I lend to my during her life two negroes named George and Hannah.
I lend by wife one other negro named Judah until my youngest daughter comes of age or marries.
I lend to my wife during her widowhood, the trace of land whereon I now live together with the mill thereon and it is also my will that by the consent of my wife my executors shall dispose of the land whose title shall be valid and with the money purchase a tract of land northerly where I wish my wife and family to remove to and further it is my will that after my wifes decease or marriage the above willed land shall be sold and equally divided between all my surviving daughters.
I give to my daughter Elizabeth, two negroes Rachel and Charles.
I give to my son Joseph, two negroes Milly and her youngest child together with a tract of land lying on Logden Creek, containing two hundred and seventy acres.
I give to my daughter Agnes, two negroes Vinney and Toney.
I give to my son Thomas one negro named Will, one feather bed and furniture, two cows and calves together with my upper tract of land on Logdam Creek containing two hundred and seventy acres.
I give to my daughter Polly, two negroes Boland and Davy.
I give to my daughter Penelope four negroes, Jim, Biddy, Thency and Benn, one feather bed and furniture, one horse and saddle and two cows and calves.
I give to my son John, one negro named Sam, one horse and saddle one bed and furniture, two cows and calves.
I give to my son Micajah, one negro named Nelly, one horse and saddle, one feather bed and furniture and two cows and calves.
I give to my daughter Sarah, four negroes, Theny Frank and John, when she marries or comes of age and after my wifes death or marriage a negro named Judah.
I give to my two sons John and Micajah my two bounties of land on Sand Run to be equally divided by my executors, having respect to quality and quantity, and it is further my will that my mill Logan Creek together with a lot of land containing 30 to 35 acres be sold to the best advantage, ten pounds of which money I give my son Joseph and ten pounds to my son Thomas, the balance to be equally divided between my two sons John and Micajah, and
It is further my will that all my just debts be paid and all my estate not herein bequeathed shall be at the disposal of my executors to purchase a tract of land and make the improvements etc for my wife and family should she choose to move Northwardly, and
It is further my will that after the decease or marriage of my wife, the property purchased with my estate shall be equally divided among all my children.
I do constitute and appoint as my executors, Thomas Stoval, John Dillard, Joseph Cooper, Jr., Thomas Cooper, Jr., George Hamilton and Henry Graybill for this my will and testiment, making all former wills void. Witness my hand this twentieth day of August, seventeen hundred and ninety-three. /s/ Thomas Cooper. Wit. B. Anthony, Josiah Carter, Joseph Cooper.
 
Deed*28 February 1794 He or Thomas Cooper Jr. was granted a deed. On 28 February 1794 at Clarks Fork of Long Creek, Wilkes Co., Georgia, ([M)]; Book MM, 1794-1795, p. 338, 28 Feb. 1794, James McLean and Ruth, his wife, to Thomas Cooper, all of Wilkes Co., for £50, on Clarks Fork of Long Creek, 80 acres, adj. Robertson, said McLean, part of 500 acres granted to said McLean, 5 Aug. 1785. (signed) Jas. McLean, Ruth (x) McLean. Wit: Clayton Talbott, George Hamilton, Wm. Hudspeth. Proved by Geo. Hamilton, 30 Dec. 1794, H. Mounger, J.P. Regd. 10 Jan. 1795. (This grant was either to Thomas Cooper Sr. or Jr.6
Deed28 February 1794 He or Thomas Cooper Jr. was granted a deed. On 28 February 1794 at Clarks Fork of Long Creek, Wilkes Co., Georgia, ([M)]; Book MM, 1794-1795, p. 339, 28 Feb. 1794, James McLean and Ruth, his wife, to Thomas Cooper, all of Wilkes Co., for £200, 300 acres, originally granted to said McLean, on Clarks Fork of Long Creek. (signed) Jas. McLean, Ruth (x) McLean. Wit: George Hamilton, Wm. Hudspeth, Clayton Talbott. Proved by George Hamilton, 30 Dec. 1794, H. Mounger, J.P. Regd. 10 Jan. 1795. (This could be either Thomas Cooper Sr. or Jr.)6
 
Biography*circa 1796 "Around 1796, there was raised in Hancock County what was claimed to be the first crop of cotton ever grown in Georgia," wrote James E. Callaway, in The Early Settlement of Georgia. This statement should probably be qualified by adding short-staple cotton, as coastal Georgia had been growing long-staple cotton years before that. Thomas Cooper, who owned 1,596 acres of red clay oak and hickory land, deemed to be the best suited for cotton cultivation, was reputedly the cultivator of this first cotton crop. It is not known whether Cooper had acquired a replica of the cotton gin, invented by Eli Whitney in 1793, to remove the seeds from his short-staple cotton. The invention of the cotton gin revolutionized cotton production in the South.7 
Death*before 13 February 1796 He died at Hancock Co., Georgia, before 13 February 1796.8 
Probate*13 February 1796 A probate action was taken on his estate on 13 February 1796 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Will probated by the oath of Josiah Carter and Joseph Cooper, Sr., two of the subscribing witnesses. Joseph Cooper, Jr. and Thomas Cooper Jr. qualified as executors.

An account registered of the receipts of Legatees and others of said estate by Joseph and Thomas Cooper, executors, Jan. 10, 1798

1. Jas.Nesbit, recp't for property willed to him by Thomas Cooper, Sr., dec'd.
2. George Hamilton's rec'pt for the property willed to him by said deceased.
3. John Weeks recp't for the property willed to him by said deceased.
4. Thomas Lancaster's recp't for fifty dollars as part of a legacy bequeathed by said deceased.
5. Thomas Lancaster's recp't fo four negroes willed to him by the said deceased. (Remark: Thomas (wife Sarah) was not to receive the fourth negro until the death of wife of decedent according to the will. A married daughter could not receive her share, but her husband. (Ga. Law))
6. George Hamitlon's recp't for fourteen dollars part of his legacy.
7. John Cooper's receipt for fourteen dollars part of his legacy.
8. James Cooper's receipt for fourteen dollars as part of his legacy.
9. Thomas Lancaster's receipt for fourteen dollars as part of his legacy.
10. John Weeks receipt for fourteen dollars as part of his legacy.
11. Joseph Coopers Ditto Ditto
12. James Coopers receipt for $tp as part of his legacy.
13. John Cooper's receipt for 1 negro named Sam, cream colored mare at $43.00, cow and calf, furniture, etc. as part of his legacy

Record Book A A page 40
Vouchers registered by the Estate of Thomas Cooper dec'd - the 7th of Jan'y, 1799

James Nesbits receipt for %50, being a Legatee..........$50.00
H. Holt recpt for tax, 1797                           6.201/4
Joseph Cooper, guardian for Micajah Cooper (minor)
recp't for 1 negro womand child being part of the
property willed to him by Thos.Cooper dec'd. Jos.
Coopers recp't as above................... 131.00

Augustine Thomas, and Joseph Stovall attorneys for
John Waller, recp't for fourteen dollars..............14.00

Ellet Woods proven acct. for half (?) illegible -
Pound sign l - 8s -8d and 3s sterling           5.39

One Letter of Attorney to Joseph Stovall and Augustine
Thomas of Virginia to Collect the legacy of John Waller,
a Legatee of the Estate of Thomas Cooper, dec'd lodged in
my office by the executors of said Estate Jan. 7, 1799

Martin Martin's recp't for costs
Wm. Lawson against Thos. Cooper, Ex                      77.25
Nov. 1801
J. C. Waltons recp't for fees in the above suit           4.00
Henry Graybill (atty) receipt                          2.50
Micajah Coopers receipts for attendance as witness           2.85
S. Abercrombies receipt for tax                     12.1/2

Record Book AA, page 41. Hancock County , GA.
Thomas Cooper, Executor of the Estate of Thomas Cooper, dec'd.
Received of Moses Going, for the said estate, Oct. 15, 1801 $132.39

An account of moneys paid out of estate of Thomas Cooper, dec'd:

Thomas Lancaster     Receipt          $27.00
George Hamiltons     ditto           27.00
James Nesbits           ditto      27.00
John Weeks           ditto           27.00
Micajah Coopers      ditto      27.00
Joseph Coopers           ditto      27.00
John Coopers      ditto      27.00
John Matthews      ditto           8.00
Myles Greens          ditto           1.75
Andrew Baxters          note 19.36.9
 

Family

Sarah Anthony (15 August 1742 - 13 February 1796)
Children
Last Edited30 April 2012

Citations

  1. E-mail written 14 dec 2010 to Warren Culpepper from Martin Cooper, e-mail address.
  2. William J. Northern, Men of Mark in Georgia, Vol. V, A. B. Caldwell, 1910.
    " Samuel Boykin", pages 338-340.
  3. E-mail written 4 Jul 2008 to Culpepper Connections from Penny Hall, e-mail address.
  4. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  5. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    pages 62-63.
  6. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
  7. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Page 205.
  8. Based upon date of probate.
  9. http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~lksstarr/reports/thewill.txt
  10. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Page 126.
  11. http://www.oursouthernancestors.com/clark-002.htm, which cites John Bennett Boddie, "Historical Southern Families, pages 30-31.
  12. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    "Alexander's - Southside VA/NC, GA & AL"; contact: e-mail address.
  13. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    "CONNECTED"; Contact: Jana Long, e-mail address.
  14. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Will of Thomas Cooper dated 29 May 1843 and probated 10 Jul 1843. Page 29: Cites Will Book B-page 178.

Sarah Anthony1

F, (15 August 1742 - 13 February 1796)
FatherJoseph Anthony Sr. (2 May 1713 - 23 Nov 1785)
MotherElizabeth Clarke (15 Feb 1720 - 1813)
Name Variation She was also known as Sallie. 
Birth*15 August 1742 Sarah was born at Louisa Co., Virginia, on 15 August 1742.2 
(Family Member) Relocationcirca 1758 She was an accompanying familiy member in the relocation of Joseph Anthony Sr. circa 1758 at Bedford Co., Virginia.3 
Marriage*8 January 1762 She married Captain Thomas Cooper at Bedford Co., Virginia, on 8 January 1762 at age 19. 
Married Name8 January 1762  As of 8 January 1762, her married name was Cooper. 
(Heir) Will24 September 1785 In Joseph Anthony Sr.'s will on 24 September 1785 at Henry Co., Virginia, Elizabeth, Sarah, Christopher, Elizabeth, Penelope, Joseph, James, Mary, Agnes, Micajah, Rachel, Winifred, Mark, Bolling and Judith named as heir(s).4 
Death*13 February 1796 She died at Hancock Co., Georgia, on 13 February 1796 at age 53.2 

Family

Captain Thomas Cooper (1733 - before 13 February 1796)
Children
Last Edited24 October 2002

Citations

  1. LDS Church, compiler, Ancestral File, Intellectual Reserve, Inc..
    http://www.familysearch.org
    AFN:JJ3J-2H.
  2. Patricia Davidson-Peters, compiler, Patricia Davidson-Peters, Anthony: Quakers of Colonial Virginia, 2000-2005.
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~sunnyann/anthony.html
  3. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    page 255.
  4. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    pages 253-254.
  5. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Page 126.
  6. http://www.oursouthernancestors.com/clark-002.htm, which cites John Bennett Boddie, "Historical Southern Families, pages 30-31.
  7. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    "Alexander's - Southside VA/NC, GA & AL"; contact: e-mail address.
  8. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    "CONNECTED"; Contact: Jana Long, e-mail address.
  9. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Will of Thomas Cooper dated 29 May 1843 and probated 10 Jul 1843. Page 29: Cites Will Book B-page 178.

William Boykin I

M, (say 1680 - 19 June 1731)
FatherEdward Boykin (s 1650 - 27 May 1728)
MotherAnn Gwaltney (s 1652 - c 1727)
Birth*say 1680 William was born at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, say 1680. 
Marriage*say 1703 He married (?) Burwell say 1703. 
Marriage*say 1720 He married Margaret Vickers say 1720.1 
Will*19 June 1731 He made a will at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, on 19 June 1731, naming as executor(s) Margaret Boykin, naming as heir(s) William Boykin II, John Boykin, Thomas Boykin, Simon Boykin and Martha Boykin.

In the name of God Amen. I, William Boykin being very sick and weak of body but of perfect mind and memory, praise be therefore given to Almighty God, do ordain this my present and last Will and Testament and in manner and form following: (that is to say)
     First and principally I commend my Soul into the hands of Almighty God. Hoping thro merits death and passion of my Saviour Jesus H C to have full and free pardon of all my sins and to inherit everlasting life and my body to be decently buried at the discretion of my Exec. hereafter named. As touching the dispositon of all such Temporal Estate as it hath pleased Almighty God to Bestow upon me I give and dispose as followeth, first I Will that all my Debts and funeral Charges be paid and discharged.
     Item; I give unto my loving wife Margaret Boykin the use of the Plantation whereon I now live and all the lands thereunto belonging beginning at the Mouth of the Cattail Branch and so up Tuckers Swamp to the Sfourth Branch which said Branch being the first Branch below the Plantation I bought of Thomas Boykin and so up the said Branch to the line quantity in all about one hundred and twenty acres during her Natural life and after her death I give the same to my son Simon Boykin and his Heirs forever.
     Item. I give and bequeath to my son William Boykin the two hundred and forty acres of land at Roanoak that I bought of James Spears to him my said son William Boykin and his Heirs forever.
Item. I give to my son William Boykin seven cows and eight Heifers out of my part of the Stock--that John Bruce has at fishing Creek to raise at halves to him my said son William Boykin and his Heirs forever.
     Item. I give and bequeath unto my son John Boykin the Plantation and the land I bought of my Brother Thomas Boykin, beginning at a Branch below the Plantation and so up the Swamp to the Second Branch above the Plantation and so up the said Branch till it winds off, and then straight to the Line; quantity in all about one hundred and forty acres to him my said son John Boykin and his Heirs forever.
     Item. I give and bequeath unto my son Thomas Boykin all my lands in the fork of Tuckers Swamp also a Patent for one hundred eighty acres of land where John Phillips formerly lived to him my said son Thomas Boykin and his Heirs forever.
     Item. I give unto my Daughter Martha Boykin Twenty Pounds Current and Money to her my Daughter and her Heirs forever.
     Item. I give unto my loving wife Margaret Boykin the use of my Negro Man named George during her natural life or widowhood and after her death or marriage I give the said Negro George to my son Simon Boykin and his Heirs forever.
     Item. I give and bequeath unto my sons William, John, Thomas and Simon Boykin five hundred acres of land in my patent at Fishing Creek in North Carolina to be equally divided to them my sons William, John, Thomas and Simon Boykin and their Heirs forever.
     Item. All the rest and residue of my Good Chattels and personal Estate whatsoever I give to my loving wife Margaret Boykin my sons William Boykin, John Boykin, Thomas Boykin, Simon Boykin and my daughter Martha Boykin to be equally divided to them my wife Margaret my sons William, John, Thomas, Simon and my daughter Martha and their Heirs forever and I do constitute and ordain my loving wife Margaret Boykin my whole and sole Executrix of this my last Will and Testament Revoking Disannulling and making Void all other Wills and Testament heretofore made by me. In Witness whereof I have put my hand and Seal to this my present last Will and Testament this 19th day of June 1731.
          Willam W Boykin (Seal)
Signed sealed and delivered for his last Will and Testament in presence of us
     Wm (x) Carroll, Thos. T. (x) Moor, Jun., M. Kinchin

On the border of the paper is the following
     Item. I give and bequeath unto my loving friend John Bruce one hundred acres of land in my part at fishing Creek in North Carolina to him the said John Bruce and his heirs forever.

Appraisement of the Estate of Goods and Chattels of William Boykin, Deceased etc., June 25, 1733, Value £379-9-4. (Will Book C, Isle of Wight Co., VA, p. 351-4.)2
 
Death*19 June 1731 He died at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, on 19 June 1731. 
Biography* William Boykin (I) m. Margaret, daughter of Ralph Vicars, who married secondly Thomas Vaughan. Ralph Vicars died after his son-in-law William Boykin. Ralph's will was dated Feb. 16, 1744, and probated Feb. 1747. He bequeathed to "Grandsons Thomas and Simon Boykin tract of land bought of Benjamin Boykin, permission to gr. daughter Martha Boykin to live on plantation as long as she shall live; to daughter Martha Vaughan, the wife of Thomas Vaughan, one shilling. Brother Abraham Carnall, sole executor.
     William Boykin was evidently married twice, as Ralph Vicars only mentioned three of his Boykin grandchildren in his will and they were his sole heirs. William made his will June 19, 1731, and probated Sept. 25, 1732, as follows "To wife Margaret Boykin, use of plantation where I live and land below plantation I bought of Thomas Boykin, 120 acres, for life and after death to son Simon Boykin , to son William Boykin , 240 acres I bought at Roanoke of James Shears and cattle that John Bruce has at Fishing Creek; to son John, land I bought of my brother Thomas Boykin 140 acres; to son Thomas all land at Lucke's Swamp. Also patent of 150 acres where John Phillips formerly lived; to daughter Martha Boykin £20, to sons William, John, Thomas, Simon, my patent of 500 acres at Fishing Creek at N.C. Wife extex. Moved to S.C.
     Kath Dunkley, will 1758, was a Joyner. She mentions sister Elizabeth wife of John Boykin of So. Carolina, sister Cherry, wife of John Boykin of N.C., names two brothers, mother, and Thomas Joyner.
     William Boykin, son of the above William, appears to be the one whose will dated Oct. 26, 1786, was probated in Southampton Co., Feb. 12, 1789. His legatees were: daughters Patience Whitehead and Catharine Harris, son William; residue of estate to be divided between children, Brittain, William, Shadrick, Sarah Williamson, Widow, and Martha Hough. Wits. Edward Neal, Stephen Summerell. (CII- 89).
     John Boykin, brother of above William, married Cherry Joyner, who is mentioned in the will of Katrine Joyner Dunkley in 1758 as her sister (Southampton Wills I, Chapman). John made his will in Halifax, N.C., Jan. 10, 1762, probated March Court 1762; legatees sons Benjamin, Joseph, Chaney Boykin; James M. Lane, Wm. Pope, James and Eli Harris. Exrs. wife Cherry and James Harris. (Bk I-60)
     John Boykin made his will Oct. 8, 1794, in Southampton as John Boykin, Sr., same probated April 9, 1795. His legatees were: dau. Cherry, wife of Robert Eley; sons, Mathew, John, Joel, Daniel and Ely; dau. Patience, wife of Jacob Turner; dau. Elizabeth, Dau. Martha, wife of Thomas Vick; dau. Ava, wife of William Branch; dau. Keziah; dau. Sarah, wife of Arthur Sherrod. Exrs., son Ely and Jacob Turner. Wits. Britton Britt, John Cook, Prederick Boykin. (CII-130).
     Simon Boykin, brother of the above William and John Boykin, made his will June 15, 1787, probated Sept. 11, 1788. His legatees were sons Arthur, Simon; daughter Martha Bridger and grandchildren James, William, Patsy and John Bridger; granddaughters Sally Williams Boykin and Charlotte, daughters of Simon Boykin. (CII-85).3
 
Biography William Boykin mar. twice, 1st (Burwell?) (name unknown), 2nd wife Margaret Vickers, dau. of Ralph Vickers (mentioned in Will) He also mentions his brother Thomas Boykin. "In 1724-1727 granted 479 acres of land" (Bk.12, 0.499) Feb. 22, 1724, one hundred and seventy acres"      "William Boykin, of Southampton Co., Va., sells for 47 pounds 10-s-current money of Va., to me in hand paid by James Maxfield, of Duplin Co., NC. "signed Wm. Boykin.p-459-b-16-Va. Land Grants "Land" south side of Main Black Water Swamp, to Ed. Boykin. (This Ed. Boykin was his brother, who settled in Northampton Co., VA before 1743) "In Will of Kinchen Taylor- William Boykin, owed money to his estate, which he leaves to dau. Charlotte Elizabeth Taylor", "in 1732, Wm. Boykin -.85-Bk 2 Will & Adm. settled 23 May 1737 by John Dunkley-Thomas Gale-p-72-Wm. Boykin Est. to Thomas Vaughan, who married-the Extx R. Feb-1734.
Issue 1st wife, Burwell?
     1-William Boykin who moved to SC abt. 1755
     2-John Boykin died 1795
Issue 2nd wife, Margaret Vickers
     3-Thomas Boykin
     4-Simon Boykin
     5-Martha Boykin.4
 
Research note* It appears possible that the genealogy as published here is in error. The Francis Boykin will below seems to indicate that Francis, not William, is the grandfather of Samuel and Francis Boykin. However, this may be a different pair of Francis and Samuel Boykins than the ones in this genealogy that are the sons of William Boykin II.
--------WILL------------
From: Margaret M. Hoffman, "Northampton Co., NC 1759-1808 Genealogical Abstracts of Wills", 1975
Will 38, pg. 58, Francis Boykin, 1 Aug 1761, Halifax County September Court 1761
To daughter Mildred Wall, 1 table.
To grandsons Samuel Boykin and Francis Boykin, 1 shilling 3 pence.
Residue of my estate, tenements, goods and chattles within doors and without doors to be equally divided between my loving wife Sarah Boykin and my 4 children (names not given).
Extrs: my son John Boykin and my son-in-law William Pace; Wits: John Wade, Charles Gregory.
------END OF WILL--------------
More research is needed, and I have recorded the possible discrepancy here to make sure I eventually try to resolve it. If anyone can help me with this, please contact Warren Culpepper (contact info in footnote.)5

 

Family 1

(?) Burwell (say 1682 - )
Children

Family 2

Margaret Vickers (say 1700 - )
Children
Last Edited15 August 2004

Citations

  1. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
    This marriage proved in Isle of Wight Co., VA Bonds-Chapman-5, page 52: "Margaret Vickers Boykin, widow of William Boykin, married Thomas Vaughan."
  2. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
    Cites: Wills of Isle of Wight Co., VA, Book 3, p 321-22.
  3. "Boykin of Isle of Wight," Historical Southern Families, Vol. IIIFTM CD191.
  4. Anne Jacobs Boykin (Mrs. Robert Neal) Murphy, History and Genealogy of the Boykin Family, Mrs. Robert Neal Murphy and Bernard Carter Boykin, Richmond, VA, 1964.
  5. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.

Etienne Mallet

M, (circa 1707 - )
Name-Comm His was commonly known as Stephen. 
Birth*circa 1707 Etienne was born circa 1707. 
Marriage*1728 He married an unknown person in 1728. 
Research note* On 5 Dec 2005, Lawrence Edward "Larry" Mallette wrote:
     You asked about parents of Etienne, father of Judith Mallet Clark. His father was Etienne, who arrived in 1699 with his wife Marie aboard the "Mary and Ann", the first of four ships bearing Huguenots from London to Virginia, to settle at Mannakintown, near present day Richmond. Etienne died in about 1712, leaving his son and two daughters orphans, as Marie had predeceased him. The three children are listed in Brock in a census from around 1714 as among 14 orphans. All this is available online. See: http://manakin.addr.com/, http://manakin.addr.com/web.htm and http://manakin.addr.com/brock4.htm. Another copy and background is at http://www.ls.net/~newriver/va/manakin.htm
     BTW, I am descended from Judith's older brother, William.
     Etienne's will stated he was a native of Bordeaux and lists his three children, thereby authenticating Etienne as his son. Unfortunately, I do not have authenticated any information about Etienne and Marie's life before Virginia.
     There was an Etienne Malett baptized in Sep 1674 at the Huguenot church in Threadneedle Street, London, the son of Jacob Malett. Another Etienne Mailet was witness (godfather).
     In Jul 1673, an Etienne Mailet, a native of Montauban, married Marie Coquart at the church. He was son of Etienne.
     It is possible the the Elder Etienne had two sons, Jacob and Etienne, and that Jacob named his son after his grandfather. But why would Etienne have been born in Bordeaux and baptized in London? Perhaps he was carried to London so that his grandparents could serve as godparents. Bordeaux is just west of and down river from Montauban, so perhaps Jacob and wife were en route when the infant arrived, or they could have removed to Bordeaux from Montauban before deciding to leave France later.
     I lack two key bits of authentication:
          1. Etienne bap. 1674 as our Etienne who came to Virginia.
          2. Jacob as son of Etienne the Elder, and brother of Etienne who married in 1673.
     I'd like to find a birth registration for Etienne in Bordeaux, which would
give his parents names. I'd like to find the record of his marriage to Marie. If I could find one of these two items, we could verify that Jacob was the father of the same Etienne who came to Virginia. Then we would need to connect Jacob to his father Etienne.
     A couple of sites on the internet have already made these connections, but without giving the authentication source.
     Hope this helps. Let me know if you locate any of the missing records above.1
 

Family

Child
Last Edited1 January 2012

Citations

  1. E-mail written 5 Dec 2005 to Warren Culpepper from Lawrence Edward "Larry" Mallette, Houston, Texas, e-mail address.

Joseph Anthony Sr.1,2

M, (2 May 1713 - 23 November 1785)
FatherMark Anthony (s 1680 - )
MotherIsabella Hart (1682 - )
Birth*2 May 1713 Joseph was born at Henrico Co., Virginia, on 2 May 1713. 
Marriage*27 April 1741 He married Elizabeth Clarke at Louisa Co., Virginia, on 27 April 1741 at age 27.3 
Relocation*circa 1758 He relocated circa 1758 at Bedford Co., Virginia,4 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1783
(DAR Listing: Joseph Anthony, Sr., born 2 May 1813 in Virginia, died 23 Nov 1785 in Virginia, married Elizabeth Clarke, Patriotic Service, Virginia.)2 
Will*24 September 1785 He made a will at Henry Co., Virginia, on 24 September 1785, naming as executor(s) Thomas Cooper Jr., naming as heir(s) Elizabeth Anthony, Sarah Cooper, Christopher Anthony, Elizabeth Candler, Penelope Johnson, Joseph Anthony Jr., James Anthony, Mary Carter, Agnes Blakey, Micajah Anthony, Rachel Anthony, Winifred Anthony, Mark Anthony, Bolling Anthony and Judith Anthony.

The will of Joseph (probated 22 Dec 1785, Henry Co. Will Book 1, p. 120) named his wife Elizabeth and his children Sarah Cooper, Christopher, Elizabeth Candler, Penelope Johnson, Jospeh, James, Mary Carter, Agness Blaky, Micajah, Rachel, Winiford, Mark, Bolling and Judith. Thomas Cooper, husband of Sarah, and the sons Joseph, James and Micajah were executors. Shortly after the death of the elder Joseph, many of his family moved to Georgia, being found in the records of Wilkes, Elbert, Lincoln, Franklin and subsequently other counties.5 
Death*23 November 1785 He died at Henry Co., Virginia, on 23 November 1785 at age 72. 
Biography* The members of the Anthony family who moved from Henry Co., VA to Wilkes Co., GA, are said to have gone to Bedford from Louisa Co., VA arriving in Bedford as early as 1858 when John was a lieutenant of militia. By 1782, most of the family were seated in Henry, Bedford and Campbell counties. James, Joseph, Joseph Sr., Joseph Jr. and Micajah were taxed in Henry Co.6 

Family

Elizabeth Clarke (15 February 1720 - 1813)
Children
Last Edited30 April 2012

Citations

  1. LDS Church, compiler, Ancestral File, Intellectual Reserve, Inc..
    http://www.familysearch.org
    AFN:8J6Z-WM.
  2. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  3. LDS Church, compiler, Ancestral File, Intellectual Reserve, Inc..
    http://www.familysearch.org
    AFN:5WZH-C0.
  4. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    page 255.
  5. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    pages 253-254.
  6. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    page 253.
  7. Genealogies of Virginia Families, .
    Volume I, A-Ch, Anthony-Cooper, page 13.
  8. Genealogies of Virginia Families, .
    Volume I, A-Ch, Anthony-Cooper, page 14.
  9. Genealogies of Virginia Families, .
    Volume I, A-Ch, Anthony-Cooper, page 14.

Elizabeth Clarke

F, (15 February 1720 - 1813)
FatherChristopher Clarke (1681 - 1754)
MotherPenelope Johnson (14 Aug 1684 - 10 Aug 1756)
AFN* Her Ancestral File Number is AFN:5WZH-C0. 
Birth*15 February 1720 Elizabeth was born at Louisa Co., Virginia, on 15 February 1720. 
Marriage*27 April 1741 She married Joseph Anthony Sr. at Louisa Co., Virginia, on 27 April 1741 at age 21.1 
Married Name27 April 1741  As of 27 April 1741, her married name was Anthony.1 
(Family Member) Relocationcirca 1758 She was an accompanying familiy member in the relocation of Joseph Anthony Sr. circa 1758 at Bedford Co., Virginia.2 
(Heir) Will24 September 1785 In Joseph Anthony Sr.'s will on 24 September 1785 at Henry Co., Virginia, Elizabeth, Sarah, Christopher, Elizabeth, Penelope, Joseph, James, Mary, Agnes, Micajah, Rachel, Winifred, Mark, Bolling and Judith named as heir(s).3 
Death*1813 She died at Wilkes Co., Georgia, in 1813. 

Family

Joseph Anthony Sr. (2 May 1713 - 23 November 1785)
Children
Last Edited29 September 2002

Citations

  1. LDS Church, compiler, Ancestral File, Intellectual Reserve, Inc..
    http://www.familysearch.org
    AFN:5WZH-C0.
  2. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    page 255.
  3. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    pages 253-254.
  4. Genealogies of Virginia Families, .
    Volume I, A-Ch, Anthony-Cooper, page 13.
  5. Genealogies of Virginia Families, .
    Volume I, A-Ch, Anthony-Cooper, page 14.
  6. Genealogies of Virginia Families, .
    Volume I, A-Ch, Anthony-Cooper, page 14.

James Harvey

M, (1751 - circa October 1807)
Father(?) Harvey (s 1724 - ); 
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Birth*1751 James was born at Virginia in 1751. 
Marriage*before 1775 He married Sarah Judith Clarke at Edgefield Co., South Carolina, before 1775.1 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1783
(DAR Listing: James Harvey, born 1755 in North Carolina, died 1807 in Georgia, married Sarah Clarke, Private, Georgia
-----------------------------------------------
Battle of Kettle Creek, Wilkes Co., GA. A monument has been erected at the site in memory of the Revolutionary War soldiers who fought there.)2,3 
Deed*1 July 1784 He granted a deed to Josiah Carter on 1 July 1784 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Book A, 1784-1786, p. 51, 1 & 2 July 1784, James Harvey and Sarah his wife, to Josiah Carter, all of Wilkes Co. Lease and Release, for £50, 200 acres, on the N. side of Ogechee, granted Harvey, 25 Nov. 1783, adj. N.W. by Ogechee River, all other sides vacant when surveyed. (signed) James Harvey, Sarah (x) Harvey. Wit: Henry Graybill, J.P., John Harvey, Richard (x) Hamlin. Proved 27 July 1785 by witnesses, Benj. Thompson, J.P. Regd. 12 Oct. 1785, Benj. Catching, C.W.C.4
 
Deed*5 July 1788 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted on 5 July 1788 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Book FF, 1789, p. 28, 5 July 1788, Josiah Carter and Mary, his wife, to James Thweat, all of Wilkes Co., for £30, 795 acres, on Ogechee, adj. W. by Wm. Ramsey & James Harvey, all other sides vacant at time of orig. survey, granted Carter, 26 Apr. 1787. (signed) Josiah Carter, Mary (x) Carter. Wit: John Bush, J.P. Mary Carter, wife of Josiah Carter, rel. dower rights before John Bush, J.P. Regd. 30 June 1789.4
 
Deed23 August 1789 He witnessed a deed grant on 23 August 1789 at Greene Co., Georgia,

Book D, Page 169: 23rd August 1789. Abraham Reddick and Ahannah, his wife, of Greene County to William Turner of same place for the sum of one hundred pounds for a tract of land containing two hundred acres in Greene County on the Twelve-Mile Beaverdam of Shoulderbone. Said land granted to said Abraham Reddick 31st March 1786. Wit: Hen. Graybill, J.P. and James Harvey. Reg: 23rd August 1799.5 
Deed18 October 1790 He witnessed a deed grant on 18 October 1790 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Book MM, 1794-1795, p. 413, John Hill, now of Wilkes Co., Ga., for £50, to John Robertson of Greene Co., Ga., planter, 140 acres, part of 500 acres granted to said Hill in 1786, on creek side on old line, a direct square to a disputed line, down disputed line to Rocky Comfort Creek, up creek, adj. Thomas Flin, 18 Oct. 1790. (signed) John Hill. Wit: Jas. Harvey, J.P., Thos. Clark. Regd. 23 Feb. 1795.4
 
Deed*December 1792 He was the original land grant recipient in the deed granted in December 1792 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book C, Page 100-103: 10th April 1797, Edward Prince and Lucy, his wife, of Edgefield County, South Carolina to John Shakleford, Senr. of Hancock County, Georgia for sum of five hundred and fifty three dollars for all that tract of land containing 388 acres in Hancock County, GA. and on waters of Beaver Dam. Adj. Capt. Samuel Reed's line and William Wiley's corner and Dixon Hall's land and between Gaither & Wiley. Said land being granted to James Harvey of Hancock County, GA day December 1792. Wit: James Shackleford, Samuel Reed and William Harper. Reg: 25th July 1798.5
 
Deed27 August 1793 He witnessed a deed grant on 27 August 1793 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book A, page 26: 27th August 1793. Obadiah Richardson and Jane, his wife of Greene County to Stephen Bishop of Washington County for the sum of two hundred pounds, for a tract of land lying in Greene County and containing two hundred and eighty seven and half acres, lying on the twelve mile Beaverdam Creek of Shoulderbone and adjoining lands of John Swinney, Nicholas Long and Daniel Richardson. Signed by Obadiah Richardson and Janey Richardson. Wit: Joshua Bishop, Zebadiah Briggs, Dixon Hall and James Harvey, J.P.5
 
Deed13 December 1793 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted on 13 December 1793 at Greene Co., Georgia,

Book B, Page 374: 13th December 1793. Peter Jackson and Susana, his wife, of Greene County to John Michael and Samuel Lawrence, merchant, of same place for the sum of five hundred pounds sterling for a tract of land in Greene County on the waters of Powel's creek south of Ogeechee, containing two hundred and twelve acres, it being part of a eight hundred and sixty five acre tract of land granted to said Peter Jackson on 10th December 1793, and bounded by Herndon and Harvey, by Graybill, by Stewart's, and by Middleton's land. Wit: James Orrick and Tunstall Roan.5
 
Deed*14 December 1793 He granted a deed on 14 December 1793 at Greene Co., Georgia,

Book B, Page 372: 14th December 1793. James Harvey and Sarah, his wife, of Greene County to Edward Prince of Edgefield County, South Carolina for the sum of twenty shillings for a tract of land in Greene County on the waters of Twelve Mile Beaverdam and joining Tucker's land and by Bishop's land and Reid's land and by Sheffield's land. Said land containing four hundred acres, it being the same granted to said Harvey and dated 6th December 1792. Signed by James Harvey and Sary Harvey. Wit: John Lamar, J.P. and Jeremiah Clark.5
 
Deed15 March 1794 He witnessed a deed grant on 15 March 1794 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book ?, Page 376: 15th March 1794. John Lamar of Hancock County, and Franky, his wife, to Thomas Airs of same place for the sum of one hundred pounds sterling for a tract of land containing two hundred and nineteen acres being part of an eight hundred acre tract granted to Robert Middleton on 21st February 1785 in Wilkes County, now Hancock County on Shoulderbone and joining Williamsons's and others. Wit: William Mornix(?), Joshua King and James Harvey, J.P. Reg: 7th May 1800.5
 
(Deed Witness) Deed15 April 1794 He witnessed a deed grant by Joseph Cooper on 15 April 1794 at Wilkes Co., Georgia, (Book PP, 1796-1798, p. 115, 15 Apr. 1794, Joseph Cooper of Hancock Co., Ga., to James Brewer of co. afsd., for £200, 200 acres in Wilkes Co., Ga. on Rocky Creek waters, being all the tract granted to Samuel Simpson, 13 Dec. 1785. (beginning of deed is 15 Apr. 1794, ending of deed is 15 Apr. 1797). (signed) Jos. Cooper. Wit: Jas. Harvey, J.P., Thos. Crittenden. Regd. 17 July 1797.)4 
Deed2 May 1794 He witnessed a deed grant on 2 May 1794 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book B, Page 9: 2nd May 1794. Jones Parsons of Hancock County to Edmund Crowder of same place, sold a tract of land containing four acres, situated in Hancock County on the waters of Ogeechee, adjoining tract of land belonging to the society of Powell's Creek Meeting House, and bounded by James Hutchinson's land and by Parson's land. Wit: Jas. Harvey, J.P.5
 
Deed12 May 1794 He granted a deed on 12 May 1794 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book B, Page 292: We, James Christopher and James Harvey of Hancock County are firmly bound unto Myles Greene, Register of Probate for Hancock County for the sum of one thousand pounds sterling. The condition of this obligation is such that James Christopher, administrator of the goods and chatties and credits of Henry Guyer, deceased, do make an inventory of said deceased. This 12th May 1794.5
 
Deed2 December 1794 He witnessed a deed grant on 2 December 1794 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book B, Page 384: 2nd December 1794. John Lamar of Hancock County to William Williams of same place for the sum of one hundred pounds sterling for a tract of land containing two hundred and thirty acres in Hancock County on the waters of Rocky and Island Creek, adjoining Clemons' land formerly called Smith's land and Glascock's land called in plat of this land when first surveyed, vacant, and by Grey's land also called vacant, by Felps' land and Barren's land. Wit: Jas. Harvey and Lewis Barnes.5
 
Deed8 May 1795 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted on 8 May 1795 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book ?, Page 251: 8th May 1795. John Boyd and Robert Boyd, planters, of Edgefield County to Edmond Garrett of Hancock County for the sum of sixty pounds a tract of land containing two hundred acres or one old ware, lying in Hancock County and on the Beaverdam Creek of Ogeechee River adjoining James Harvey's and Richard Hamblin's land, being granted to said John Boyd on 10th February 1785. Wit: Michel Gilbert and Henry Garrett. Reg: 10th January 1800.5
 
Deed11 October 1798 He witnessed a deed grant on 11 October 1798 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book C, Pages 159-161: State of Georgia, 11th October 1798, Thomas Johnson of Hancock County, Georgia to William Sanders of same place for sum of 685 dollars for a tract of land containing 150 acres in Hancock County, GA on Buffaloe Creek. Adj. Hilley Philips' corner and Pinkerton and Harvey's land. Wit: Williamson Reese and Josiah Dennis. Reg: 22nd October 1798.5
 
Deed19 July 1799 He granted a deed on 19 July 1799 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book ?, Page 497: 19th July 1799. James Harvey of Hancock County to Robert Gilbert of same place for the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars for a tract of land containing two hundred and twenty seven acres in Hancock County on the waters of Ogeechee and being granted to the said James Harvey dated 6th February 1799. Wit: Hen. Graybill, J.P. and John Bandle. Reg: 24th September 1800.5
 
Deed29 January 1801 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted on 29 January 1801 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book ?, Page 98: 29th January 1801. George Collins and Sarah, his wife, of Hancock County to Abner Atkins of same place for the sum of four hundred and fifty dollars for a tract of land in Hancock County on Fulsoms Creek, containing eighty nine acres adjoining Benj. Evans' line and by Harvey's, Hawkins's line. Wit: (illegible) Collins and (illegible). Reg: 5th March 1801.5
 
Deed3 July 1801 He witnessed a deed grant on 3 July 1801 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Book ?, Page 233: 3rd (illegible) 1801. John Harvey of Hancock County to Obdiah Richardson of same place for the sum of one thousand dollars for a tract of land in Hancock County containing six hundred acres, excepting that part that lies within the limits of Samuel Parson's land, adjoining Call's and vacant land and by the Wilkes old County line. Said land granted to Edmond Byne on 7th September 1786 and conveyed by said Byne to John Harvey on 11th January 1801. Wit: Hines Holt, James Harvey and Jos. B. Chambers, J.P. Reg: 24th July 1801.5
 
Miscellaneous28 April 1804 The earliest school whose location is definitely known was in Powelton for on April 28,1804, John Michael, "for and in consideration of the love of learning," gave half an acre of land to James Harvey, William Lee, Sampson Duggar, Thomas Cooper and John Michael as trustees of the Powelton school "lately built" on the site. He also conveyed the privilege of using water from the spring convenient thereto. This school was a predecessor of Powelton Academy founded in 1811 and incorporated in 1815 with a board of trustees consisting of William Rabun, Nicholas Childers, Thomas Cooper, Sampson Duggar, Archibald R. S. Hunter, James Crowder, Reuben T. Battle, John Veazey and Stephen Weston. 
Will*16 January 1807 He made a will at Hancock Co., Georgia, on 16 January 1807, naming as executor(s) Thomas Cooper Jr. and Rev. John Harvey, naming as heir(s) Sarah Judith Clarke and Judith Harvey. It was witnessed by Michael Harvey.

In his will, probated on 4 Nov 1807, James Harvey named his wife, Sary Harvey; his sons John, Richard, Apsey, Leroy, Jeremiah and Asenath; and his daughters Judith, Elizabeth Lucy, Mary, and Rebecah. Exrs: Sary Harvey, Thomas Cooper, John Harvey; Wits: John Harvey, Hardy Jernigan and Michael Harvey Sr. (Need to look up actual will on microfilm.)6 
Death*circa October 1807 He died at Hancock Co., Georgia, circa October 1807. 

Family

Sarah Judith Clarke (circa 1758 - after 1813)
Child
Last Edited30 April 2012

Citations

  1. Alton Lewis Harvey, The John Harvey (1720-1772) Family of the Edgefield District, SC, A. L. Harvey, 2006, Repository: Warren Culpepper's Personal Library.
  2. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  3. Ceded Lands - Records of St. Paul Parish and Early Wilkes Co., GA, Alden Associates, Albany, GA, 1964.
    page 88.
  4. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
  5. Hancock Co., GA Deed Books 1794 - 1802, .
  6. Hancock Co., GA Wills (1792-1842), DAR, 1950.
    Cites Book C (1803-1806), page 429.
  7. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Will of Thomas Cooper dated 29 May 1843 and probated 10 Jul 1843. Page 29: Cites Will Book B-page 178.

Sarah Judith Clarke1

F, (circa 1758 - after 1813)
FatherJohn Clarke1 (1728 - 1794)
MotherJudith Mallet1 (2 Sep 1736 - )
Birth*circa 1758 Sarah was born circa 1758. 
Married Namebefore 1775  As of before 1775, her married name was Harvey. 
Marriage*before 1775 She married James Harvey at Edgefield Co., South Carolina, before 1775.2 
Deed*1 July 1784 She granted a deed to Josiah Carter on 1 July 1784 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Book A, 1784-1786, p. 51, 1 & 2 July 1784, James Harvey and Sarah his wife, to Josiah Carter, all of Wilkes Co. Lease and Release, for £50, 200 acres, on the N. side of Ogechee, granted Harvey, 25 Nov. 1783, adj. N.W. by Ogechee River, all other sides vacant when surveyed. (signed) James Harvey, Sarah (x) Harvey. Wit: Henry Graybill, J.P., John Harvey, Richard (x) Hamlin. Proved 27 July 1785 by witnesses, Benj. Thompson, J.P. Regd. 12 Oct. 1785, Benj. Catching, C.W.C.3
 
(Heir) Will16 January 1807 Sarah and Judith named as heir(s) in the will of James Harvey at Hancock Co., Georgia, on 16 January 1807.4 
Death*after 1813 She died at Hancock Co., Georgia, after 1813. 
Biography* Sarah Clark, daughter of John and Judith Clark, married prior to 1779 James Harvey, son of Thomas and Rachel Harvey, who was born an Virginia about 1755 and died in Hancock Co., Ga. in 1807. Sarah (Clark) Harvey died an Hancock Co. in 1813. James Harvey, like his father Thomas Harvey (sic) (Thomas was actually a brother of James)2 and his brothers, John, Evan, Michael and Richard Harvey, served in the Revolution an South Carolina and Georgia (see Harvey Family), and received land-grants an Georgia for has Revolutionary services (see D.A.R. Lineage Book, XX, 39; Salley "Stub Indents to Rev. Claims in S.C."; Candler "Rev. Records of Ga.", II, Pp. 555 and 677, Knight "Ga. Roster of the Rev.", p. 383; Smith' Story of Ga. and Ga. People", p. 617). James Harvey lived for several years in Wilkes Co., Ga., but was in Greene Co. in 1792, and by 1802 was in Hancock Co., where he died. His will was dated Jan. 16, 1807 and his appraisement occurred on Nov. 4, 1807 (Hancock Co. W.B. "C", pp. 429 and 432). The will mentions has wife Sarah and children Judith, Lucy, Mary, Rebecca, John, Elizabeth, Jeremiah, Richard, Epsy, Leroy, and Asenath; makes has wife Sarah, son-in-law Thomas Cooper and son John Harvey executors; and was witnessed by has brothers, John Harvey, Sr., and Michael Harvey, Sr. The inventory of Sarah (Clark) Harvey was dated Jan. 21, 1813 (Hancock W.B. "G", p. 158). I have no record of the descendants of the sons of James and Sarah (Clark) Harvey. Of the daughters, the eldest, Judith Harvey, married Thomas Cooper, Jr., of Eatonton, Ga., a prominent member of the Baptist Church and a wealthy man in his day. They were parents of Congressman Mark. A. Cooper of Georgia; ancestor of the Nisbet family; and grandparents of Rev. Thomas and Rev. Samuel Boykin, distinguished Baptist ministers of Atlanta, Ga. Of the other daughters, Lucy married Edmund Low; Mary married Bennett Hillsman; Rebecca married William Williams; Elizabeth married a Mr. Johnston; Epsy married Benjamin Rutherford; and Asenath died young.1 

Family

James Harvey (1751 - circa October 1807)
Child
Last Edited5 June 2006

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.
  2. Alton Lewis Harvey, The John Harvey (1720-1772) Family of the Edgefield District, SC, A. L. Harvey, 2006, Repository: Warren Culpepper's Personal Library.
  3. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
  4. Hancock Co., GA Wills (1792-1842), DAR, 1950.
    Cites Book C (1803-1806), page 429.

John Clarke1

M, (1728 - 1794)
FatherThomas Clarke (4)1 (c 1703 - 1752)
MotherSarah Norwood1 (s 1700 - )
Birth*1728 John was born at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, in 1728. 
Marriage*circa 1755 He married Judith Mallet circa 1755. 
American Revolution*circa 1776 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War circa 1776
(Revolutionary soldier in South Carolina.)2 
Death*1794 He died at Edgefield District, South Carolina, in 1794. 
Biography* John(5) Clark, son of Thomas(4) and Sarah (Norwood) Clark, was born in Isle of Wight Co., Va. The date of his birth was 1728 according to the D.A.R. Line of Mrs. Hattie Nisbet Latta, a descendant of his daughter, Sarah (Clark) Harvey, who joined the D.A.R. many years ago on John Clark's record as a Revolutionary soldier in South Carolina (D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. XX, p. 39). John Clark died in Edgefield County, S.C. in 1794. His will shows that his wife was named Judith and a series of notes made over 75 years ago on the Clark and Harvey families by Rev. Thomas Boykin, a descendant, gives her maiden name as Mallett. The notes include a letter written by John and Judith Clark's grandson, Judge James Clarke (b. 1798) of Atlanta, Ga., and the information about Judith's maiden name no doubt came from Judge Clarke. The statement in the notes was confirmed by a great-granddaughter, Mrs. Fannie Keene, who stated that Judith, wife of John Clark, was French, that she was named Mallett, and that her father was Etienne Mallett. Judith Mallet, daughter of Etienne (Stephen) and Olive (Magdaleine (Salle) Mallet was born Sept. 2, 1736 at the Huguenot colony at Manakintown, then in Goochland Co., Va. The father, Stephen Mallett, movedto Lunenburg Co., Va., about 1750, and Judith Mallett and John Clark were probably married there about 1755 (for further ancestry, see the Mallet and Salle Families). Mr. Boykin's notes further state that John Clark had a brother named Carter Clark, who lived in Mecklenburg Co., Va., which further confirms the connection of this Clark family with Thomas(4) Clark and his sons, mentioned in the preceding paragraph.

John(5) Clark first appears in the Virginia records in 1736, when his uncle, William Norwood, left him land in Isle of Wight Co., as as small child. The land fell into Southampton Co. on the organization of that county, and in 1763, as "John Clark of Lunenburg Co.", he deeded the land away. Between April 14, 1767, when he and his brothers James and Carter deeded the negro from Jordan Thomas Clark's estate to Jesse Clark, and Dec. 3, 1767, John Clark moved from Mecklenburg Co., Va., to Granville Co., S.C. (later Edgefield Co.) On the latter date John Clark of Granville Co., S.C. sold Carter Clark of Mecklenburg Co., Va., 300 acres on Allen's Creek in Mecklenburg Co. (Mecklenburg D.B. 2, p. 5); and on Nov. 12, 1770, no doubt in connection with the settlement of his brother Jesse's estate, John Clark of Granville Co., S.C., appointed James Clark his attorney for collecting debts in Mecklenburg Co. (D.B. 2, p. 540). According to his grandson, Judge James Clarke, John Clark settled about 16 miles north of Hamburg, S.C. on Stephens Creek. During the Revolution he served as a soldier in the South Carolina troops. In Rev. Thomas Boykin's notes, it is stated that John Clark was killed by marauders in his house in 1777; and my father's cousin, Ben Carter, told me that he had heard from his own grandfather, Benjamin W. Clark (another grandson of John Clark), that John was called to the door of his house and shot by Tories. This testimony seems certain, so far as John Clark's being shot and wounded is concerned. However, he could hardly have been killed, as his will, dated 1779 in Edgefield Co., S. C. , was not probated until 1794, which must have been the date of his death. The will, dated July 7, 1779 and probated at the March Term, 1794, in Edgefield Co., leaves 8 negroes and considerable landed property to his wife Judith, her property to go later to sons Jeremiah and Jesse and "the child that my wife is now big with"; son Thomas; son John, son William, son James, daughter Frances Clark; daughter Rebeckah Clark; and appoints the wife Judith and son Thomas executors. It is possible that John Clark died from his wounds in 1779, and that the will was not probated until 1794, possibly on the death of his wife. However, there was a Judith Clark who died in Edgefield Co. in 1815, her estate being administered by John Adams and payments made to Willoughby and Elizabeth Clark, minors,
under the guardianship of Thomas Dozier. This may possibly have been Judith, wife of John Clark, and the minor Clark children may have been her grandchildren, children of Jeremiah or Jesse Clark.

John Clark's wall does not mention the eldest daughter, Sarah Clark, who had already married James Harvey at the time the wall was written. However, Sarah is a well attested daughter, being mentioned in the Boykin notes, and also by Judge James Clark in 1876, he being both her nephew and her husband's great-nephew. The Boykin notes also mention a daughter Elizabeth, who was probably the unborn child mentioned in John Clark's will. Of the other children, Thomas lived and died in Edgefield Co., S.C., and so apparently did John. James Clark moved to Green Co., Ga. with has brother William, and died there. According to the Boykin notes, either Elizabeth or Frances married a Mr. Christopher, while Rebecca married an Ousley and lived in Auburn, Ala.1

 

Family

Judith Mallet (2 September 1736 - )
Children
Last Edited30 April 2012

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.
  2. D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. XX, p. 39.