Mary "Little Dove" HYANNO
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The Rest of the Story: The Ancestors of Sarah May Paddock Otstott
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Mary "Little Dove" HYANNO (1624-aft1660)

Name: Mary "Little Dove" HYANNO 1,2
Sex: Female
Nickname: "Little Dove"
Father: John "Iyannough" HYANNO (1595?-1623)
Mother: Mary NO-PEE (NOEPE) (1600?-1624)

Individual Events and Attributes

Birth 1623/24 Cape Cod, Barnstable Co, Massachusetts
Death aft 1660 (age 35-36)
Burial Old Cemetery, Barnstable, MA
Occupation full blood Native American princess

Marriage

      picture     picture    
      Priscilla Bearse Hall gravestone says: HERE LYES Ye BODY OF PRESILLER HALL WIFE TO DECON JOHN HALL AGED 68 YEARS DIED MARCH 30th 1712. The photos are from the Farber Gravestone Collection owned by the American Antiquarian Society. This is one of the earliest dated winged heads on Cape Cod. Located at the Route 6A behind Cape Playhouse grounds.     Priscilla Bearse Hall gravestone. This is one of the earliest dated winged heads on Cape Cod. Located at the Route 6A behind Cape Playhouse grounds.    
 
Spouse Augustine BEARSE (1618?-bef1697)
Children Priscilla BEARSE (1643-1712)
Marriage 1639 (age 14-15) Manachee Village, Barnstable Co, Massachusetts

Individual Note 1

Alternative spelling of surname: Iyanough. Mary was a member of the

Wampanoag Tribe. She is described as having a light complexion and

flaming red hair. There is some conjecture that these features may be

due to intermingling with early Nordic explorers.

Father: John Hyanno b: ABT 1595 in Mattakeset, Barnstable, MA

Mother: Mary No-Pee b: ABT 1600 in Gay Head, , MA

Individual Note 2

NATIVE AMERICAN PRINCESS OF THE WAMPANOAG TRIBE

 

GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER OF THE GREAT NARRAGANSETT CHIEF CANONICUS

 

According to tradition, Mary was a beautiful, light skinned woman with flaming red hair. She was a member of the Cummaquid or Mattachee sub-group of the Wampanoag Tribe. Her father died the same year she was born, so she and her brother were sent to live with her grandfather.

 

"The evidence as to the identify of the wife of Austin Bearse is found in an unpublished manuscript, entitled: 'Who Our Forefathers Really Were. A True Narrative of Our White and Indian Ancestor,' by Franklin Ele-wa-tum Bearse (a Scaticoke and Eastern Indian). This manuscript is a certified copy of an original sworn statement now on file in the office of the Litchfield County, District Court, in Connecticut, and accepted by the State Commissioner in Charge of Indian Rights and Claims as an authentic and legal declaration of lineage. It bases its claim as to the identify of Austin Bearse's wife upon statements in the original diary of Zerviah Newcomb, who married Josiah Bearse, a grandson of Austin, and who wrote from personal knowledge of the facts. Her diary is called, 'A True Chronicle of the Bearse Family.' "It is said that the above manuscript is deposited in the Congressional Library and states that Austin Bearse married by Indian rites at the Mattachee Indian village Mary, daughter of John Hyanno, a Mattachee Sagamore, and son of the Sachem Ihyannough who befriended the Pilgrims on their first arrival. In Zerviah Newcomb's diary, Austin Bearse was said to be of the Romany or Gypsy race, and the name was originally Be Arce. He belonged to a family of Continental gypsies who had emigrated to England. There was great persecution; for some minor infraction of the English law, Austin was deported to the colonies. On arriving at Plymouth, Austin was the only prisoner allotted to Barnstable. No Puritan girl at that time would marry a gypsy, as there were eligible Puritans to select from. It was therefore natural that he should marry an Indian Princess. "Further it is said that Mary Hyanno was a lovely flaming-haired Mattachee princess. Her people had an ancient tradition that a long time before white men had landed on their shores and intermarried with them. This probably indicates a Viking descent, and why the Indians were called Wampannoags (White Indians). Mary's ancestry is given as: 1. Ihyannough, Sachem of the Mattachees 2. John Hyanno, Maryland No-pee, dau. of No-took-saet 3. Mary Hyanno, Maryland Austin Bearse." --Bruce Cox

 

 

From: [email protected]

Date: Mon, 14 May 2001 15:33:01 -0700

Subject: [Barss/Bearse/ie/ce] Iyannough

To: [email protected]

Dear Friends:

I have been asked to post what I believe to be the line of the Sachim Iyannough based on what I have been taught by oral tradition and family genealogies. This information may not be entirely correct but should be viewed as oral history and open to your judgments. I do not propose to be the best authority, but please bare with me as I explain what I believe to be true. The Wampanoag people were a confederation of southern New England tribal groups, separate from each other, but with a common language and cultural base. At the time of the first English in the early 1600's there were over 60 different tribal groups within the confederation. Mary Hyanno was Mattachee also sometimes called Cummaquids, Chawmun or Shaumes. The word Mattachee translates to "place of worn planting fields." The area around Barnstable was called Mattachee/Mattachiest, with the Yarmouth area known as Mattakeeset. The Mattachee were under authority of a local leader (Iyannough) but also pledged themselves to Ousamequin, the Massasoyt at Pokenoket who was in power over much of the area. The Mattachee were closely related to the Nauset people who were located further up the Cape and who often did not join in the Wampanoag confederation. My oral tradition:

1. Highyannough: Old Cape Sachim, father of Iyannough, said to have married daughter of Canonicus, Narragansett Sachim.

2. Iyannough: Young Sagamore at Cummaquid, father of John Hyanno and Mary Hyanno. Said to have married Mary, aka Mary Nopee who was daughter of Martha's Vineyard Sachim. He was accused of being a conspirator with Massachusett people to overthrow the English. He went into hiding in swamps on the Cape and died of sickness the year of his daughters birth, along with the Sagamores Coneconam of Manamet and Aspinet of Nauset.

3. John Hyanno: Brother of Mary Hyanno and Sachim at Cummaquid and also on Martha's Vineyard, (mother's connection).

4. Mary Hyanno, daughter of Iyannough, granddaughter of Highyannough, brother of John Hyanno.

My belief is:

Highyannough 1554 to 1641 died at 87 yrs.

Iyannough 1595 to 1623 died at 28 yrs.

John Hyanno 1620 to 1680 died at 60 yrs.

Highyannough, Iyannough, and John Hyanno are sometimes confused and combined with each other. Iyannough died in the swamps at a very young age of 28 or so, the same year of his daughters birth. Mary was raised by her grandfather and later her brother until taken in marriage by Austin Bearce in 1639 at about 15 or 16 years of age. In the early days of the English 1621 to his death in 1623 Iyannough would have not been given the Christian name of John as some say, as there was no missionary contact on the Cape in those early times. His son and daughter were most likely given Christian names of John and Mary after his death when the English became more established on the Cape. The grandfather who died in his late 80's is the most likely source of the land given to Austin. The grandson, John Hyanno with other variations of his name, became the leader in the area and also is shown on deeds of land on the Cape as well as on Martha's Vineyard where he died in 1680. Historical birth and death dates do not indicate that the three men could have been one in the same. Thank you for your kindness, "Nunocksuk Matannash" (There are many stars) iootash [:ITAL] --courtesy of Alice Raven

 

Native American genealogical researcher Mary Hilliard notes that the Franklin Bearse information is regarded as accurate and trustworthy, whereas Jacobus's work is highly suspect.

 

REGARDING INDIAN NAMES

"[Mary Hyanno's] Indian name is unknown and no records record it. At some point, her name is given as Nopee. This most lokely was not her name but old maps

show that the island where she lived was Nopee Island. Knowing Indian naming customs and Sachemship laws is vitally important to research. Nopee Island was known by that name prior to the landing of the Mayflower therefore, it would have taken it's name from a Sachem or Squaw Sachem prior to Highyannough. Once that person died, (since Algonquains considered it a great insult to speak the name of a dead ancestor of reknown), it would have changed it's name to the new Sachem or Squaw Sachem. Since Mary Hyanno didn't marry anyone of equal station, she forfeited the right to name the island after herself. Therefore, the right to do so would have gone to the Chief Sachem which was, at the time the pilgrims landed, Massasoit. Since he had a sister-in-law who had marrried one of his 2 brothers (we don't know which one although mane people have made guesses), the pilgrims themselves might have named the island after her, Margaret. My guess is that the island took it's name from Mary's mother or mother-in-law since history doesn't record prior to the landing of the Mayflower. So, the Indian name of Mary Hyanno is unknown. At some point, researchers and story tellers have assighed her other names or interpertations. These are fiction. Also, so are the names now showing up on the internet that have been assigned to the parents of Massasoit. His fathers name was never spoken by the Indians and so is inrecorded. Proof of this is with the history of Hobomock who spoke ill of the father of Massasoit and so a warrent for his death was issued by Massasoit and the pilgrims had to intervene to save his life because they needed him. So Massasoit spared him." --Mary Hilliard

 

REGARDING RESEARCH BY JACOBUS AND THE FATE OF MIXED BLOOD CHILDREN IN THE 1600's

"That brings me to Jacobus. There are 2, father and son. They were not researchers, but compilers. They simply collected the information a town provided and published it. They did several towns a year. Only those who could afford an artist to do their picture and their own genealogy were entered into the town's book often refering to them as the "prominent men" of the town... no one required proof or evidence of any kind. So his sources at best are almost worthless. People at that time were hiding the true identity of their mixed blood children because they could be sold as slaves, the mother sold because of the children, and the father either sold or imprisoned. They could not hold land, inherit, get an education, etc. etc. etc. So it was a very common practice to hide the true indetity of your wives and children and others to assist you in doing so. As a result you see that often baptismal and christening records don't agree with the town records and it's common to show a woman with duplicate children with sluightly different dates because some actually belonged to the Indian wife or slave." --Mary Hilliard

 

 

 

WARNING: Some show Mary's Indian name as "Little Dove," apparently a fabricated name with no historical basis in fact. Mary's brother John Hyano has been confused with her father in many sources.

 

Presidents George H. W. and George W. Bush, as well as writer Ambrose Bierce are descendants.

 

Notes on this website are authored by Larry Overmire, unless noted otherwise. Permission of the author is required to reproduce elsewhere.

 

Sources:

1) Bruce Cox Database

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET &db=bcox2899&id=I6070

2) Who our Forefathers really were, Franklin Bearse

3) Alice Raven Database

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET &db=raviac&id=I10303

4) Inman/Goodwin Genealogical Database

http://members.aol.com/InmanFam/PERSONS.html

5) Narragansett Indians' Teepee

http://hometown.aol.com/MaryARoots/Indians.index.html

6) The Pioneers of Massachusetts, by Charles Henry Pope, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1981 [originally published in 1900]

7) Bearce, Colvin, Harring, Marston, Capiferri and Capaccioli Genealogy

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Prairie/3374/http://www.geocit ies.com/Heartland/Prairie/3374/

8) Cape Cod Genealogy, by Edward A. Cooper, 2000.

http://history.vineyard.net//allen/Web%20Cards/WC17/WC17_034.HTM

9) Little Dove

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze297s2/hyanno.htm

10) Lee Murrah's Hyano Family Page

http://www.murrah.com/gen/hyanno.htm

11) Bearse / Barss Family Page, by Lee Murrah

http://www.murrah.com/gen/bearse.htm

12) "Saints and Strangers" by George F. Williams (page 408; Time Inc. edition, 1964)

Discusses Rev. Lothop's Church.

13) Rosemary West Database, Pedigree of Dorothy Walker

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED &db=rkwest&id=I5686

14) Jacobus, Donald L., "Austin Bearse and His Alleged Indian Connectionis", The American Genealogist, published abt. 1936.

15) Descendants of Augustine Bearse

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze297s2/ab_descendents.htm

16) Bearse/Bearce

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Prairie/3374/bearce.htm

17) Jim Baker Database, Pedigree of Ambrose Bierce

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED &db=wesslingbaker1&id=I3155

18) E-mail from researcher and Native American genealogical expert Mary Hilliard, [email protected] or [email protected], 5 Dec 2004

19) Mary Hilliard Database, 11 Nov 2004

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET &db=maryhilliard&id=I11023

Individual Note 3

Marriage 1 Augustine (Immigrant, 1638 “Confidence”) * Bearse b: 1618 in Longstock, Hampshire, England

Married: Summer 1639 in Mattachee Village, (Barnstable) MA

Change Date: 10 Jul 2008

Children

Priscilla * !!! Bearse b: Bef 10 Mar 1643/44 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA

Sarah (President Bush Ancestor) Bearse b: 28 Mar 1646 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA

James (Ambrose Bierce Ancestor) Bearse b: 31 Jul 1660 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA

Joseph Bearse b: 25 Jan 1650/51 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA

 

Marriage 2 Sgt. William (Immigrant) Cornwall b: 25 May 1609 in Terling, Essex England

Married: by 1639

Change Date: 24 Jun 2005

 

Media: Website

Abbrev: Overmire Tifft Richardson Bradford Reed

Title: The Ancestry of Overmire, Tifft, Richardson, Bradford, Reed

Author: Larry Overmire

Publication: RootsWeb World Connect Project, © 2000-2007

Date: 3 May 2007

Individual Note 4

Birth: 1625 Barnstable County, Massachusetts

Death: 1700 Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts

 

These Indians were a branch of the Wampannoags or White Indians. "Austin Bearse was the 4th great grandfather of Jacob Hamblin, through his daughter Sarah Bearse who married John Hamblin. They raised a large family of children and many of the prominent families of America today can trace their ancestry to Mary Hyanno, the flaming haired princess of the Wampannoags. "The evidence as to the identify of the wife of Austin Bearse is found in an unpublished manuscript, entitled: "Who Our Forefathers Really Were. A True Narrative of Our White and Indian Ancestor," by Franklin Ele-wa-tum Bearse (a Scaticoke and Eastern Indian). This manuscript is a certified copy of an original sworn statement now on file in the office of the Litchfield County District Court, in Connecticut, and accepted by the State Commissioner in Charge of Indian Rights and Claims as an authentic and legal declaration of lineage. It bases its claim as to the identify of Austin Bearse's wife upon statements in the original diary of Zerviah Newcomb, who married Josiah Bearse, a grandson of Austin, and who wrote from personal knowledge of the facts. Her diary is called, "A True Chronicle of the Bearse Family." "It is said that the above manuscript is deposited in the Congressional Library and states that Austin Bearse married by Indian rites at the Mattachee Indian village Mary, daughter of John Hyanno, a Mattachee Sagamore, and son of the Sachem Ihyannough who befriended the Pilgrims on their first arrival. In Zerviah Newcomb's diary, Austin Bearse was said to be of the Romany or Gypsy race, and the name was originally Be Arce. He belonged to a family of Continental gypsies who had emigrated to England. There was great persecution; for some minor infraction of the English law, Austin was deported to the colonies. On arriving at Plymouth, Austin was the only prisoner allotted to Barnstable. No Puritan girl at that time would marry a gypsy, as there were eligible Puritans to select from. It was therefore natural that he should marry an Indian Princess. "Further it is said that Mary Hyanno was a lovely flaming-haired Mattachee princess. Her people had an ancient tradition that a long time before white men had landed on their shores and intermarried with them. This probably indicates a Viking descent, and why the Indians were called Wampannoags (White Indians). Mary's ancestry is given as: 1. Ihyannough, Sachem of the Mattachees 2. John Hyanno, md. No-pee, dau. of No-took-saet 3. Mary Hyanno, md. Austin Bearse.

 

In 1936, genealogist Donald Lines Jacobus submitted an article in "The American Genealogist" debunking this story of Austin Bearse's wife being an Indian Princess. The story, however, has persisted through time, no doubt with the help of the Internet. There is no proof for this theory.

 

 

Burial: Ancient Cemetery, Yarmouth Port, Barnstable County,

Massachusetts

 

 

Created by: Danette Cogswell

Record added: Jul 09, 2008

Find A Grave Memorial# 281652354

Individual Note 5

1639, Metachee Village, Cape Code. Austin Bearse and Mary "Little

Dove" Hyanno are married under Wampanog tribal ceremonial rights.

(...) Mary was a Native American princess and the daughter of Sachem

(Chief) John Iyanough of the Cummaquid, grand-daughter of Highyanough,

Sachem of all the Wampanoag, and great-granddaughter of Grand Sachem,

Canonicus, Chief of all the Narragansett. The marriage of Austin and

Mary was a major factor in the temporary peace that was maintained for

approximately two generations between the Wampanoag and the English.

 

Source:

Ancestors & Relations of Note, by Everett P. Inman, 2000

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~rett1950/gbu/gbu.html5

Individual Note 6

"Most historians call every settlement, every Indian village, a

distinct tribe - with a distinct ruler of it. They speak of their

being originally some fifteen tribes resident on Cape Cod. It is true

there were that number of villages, but was every one a distinct tribe

with its own individual form of government? (...) [No, it wasn't

because] Every Indian village on Cape Cod consisted of a people, each

and every one a member of one and the same tribe. This tribe did not,

however, live just on Cape Cod, but all the way to Narragansett Bay."

 

Source:

Cape Cod Indians - Page 1, by Susan S. Martin, 2000

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~massasoit/ccod01.htm

 

So I will refer to Mattacheese as a village and its surrounding area

which existed whithin a greater tribal community, the Pokanoks, or

Wampanoags.

The Wampanoags were one of the many Algonquin tribes, who dwelled in

the regions today known as New Brunswick and New England. You will

find a timeline of Wampanoag histoy, covering the years 11,500 BC to

1689 AD here:

 

Plimoth On Web: An Overview of Wampanoag History

http://www.plimoth.org/Library/Wampanoag/ewamphist.htm

 

This website provides highly interesting information on Wampanoag

history, political organization anc culture:

 

Wampanoag History, by Lee Sultzman

http://www.tolatsga.org/wampa.html

 

Even more extensive, with additional links to other sites on the

Wampanoag, is this source:

 

Plimoth On Web: The Wampanoag People

http://www.plimoth.org/Library/Wampanoag/wamp.htm

 

In fact, there is lots of information on the Wampanoag people on the

web, far too much to mention it all here in brief. In case you would

like to collect more information, I recommend following this search

link:

://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=wampanoag

 

Plimoth On Web: The Wampanoag People

http://www.plimoth.org/Library/Wampanoag/wamp.htm

 

In fact, there is lots of information on the Wampanoag people on the

web, far too much to mention it all here in brief. In case you would

like to collect more information, I recommend following this search

link:

://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=wampanoag

 

Now, about the village of Mattacheese. "Mattacheese" is a term from

the Wampanoag dialect of the Algonquin language, meaning "plowed

fields". This is not surprising since the Wampanoag were an

agricultural tribe; they successfully cultivated corn on their fields

and also sold it to those who were less lucky in obtaining food.

The Mattacheese area was a division of the Wampanoag federation of

villages; the leader of such a division was called "Sagamoh", which

meant "Second Chief" (to distinguish him from the "Massi-sowet", the

"Great Chief", supreme ruler of all Wampanoags). The leader of an

ordinary individual village would have been called "Mugwomp" (Captain

or Chief).

When the Pilgrim Fathers landed at Cape Cod in 1620 - the Wampanoag

had contact with Europeans since 1524 already, so the Pilgrim Fathers

were by no means the first Europeans they encountered -, the leader of

Mattacheese was Iyanough. In 1620, the Pilgrims actually skirted the

area on their journey to Plymouth, but decided not to enter the harbor

due to a snowstorm. In 1621, a young Pilgrim by the name of John

Billington wandered back into the forests of Mattacheese, lost his

way, and was eventually rescued by a band of Pilgrims aided by

Iyanough.

Iyanough was followed by his son, Hyanno, who married his daughter to

the Austin Bearse mentioned above.

At that time, however, Mattacheese was not part of the Wampanoag

federation anymore. The Narragansetts, another Algonquin tribe that

was located west of the Wampanoag territory, had taken over the area.

However, it is not clear in what year exactly the Cape Cod region

changed owners. In 1617, a plague brought by Europeans had devestated

what is New England today. Many Wampanoag tribes had been hit hard by

the pestilence, but not the Narragansetts who were ruled by their

supreme chief Canonicus, who would become an ally of the newly

arriving English later and give them land to settle.

In 1639, the village of Mattacheese became the place where the

Reverend John Lothrop and his congregation founded their settlement

the town of Barnstable.

 

Additional sources:

 

Indian History, Chapter III. Author unknown

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ma/barnstable/hbch02.txt

 

The Barnstable Patriot: 'There's more to know about Iyanough', by

Louis Cataldo

http://www.barnstablepatriot.com/01-11-02-news/cataldo.html

 

Crocker Tavern: Location

http://www.crockertavern.com/location.htm

 

Barnstable County, MA Genealogy, by Ray Sears

https://sites.rootsweb.com/~mabarnst/

 

Native Americans: Narragansett

http://nativeamericans.com/Narragansett.htm

 

FROM: http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=132397

Individual Note 7

Mary Hyanno

 

Father: John Hyanno

Mother: Mary No-Pee

Birth: 1625 Cape Cod,Massachusetts

Death: Barnstable,Barnstable Co.,Massachusetts

m: Austin (Augustine) Bearse (ABT 1618-ABT 1686)

on 1639 at Mattacheevillage,Barnstable Co.,Massachusetts

Children:

Mary Bearse (1640-)

Martha Bearse (1642-)

Priscilla Bearse (10 MAR 1644-30 MAR 1712) m. John Hall (13 MAY 1638-13 OCT 1710) on 1660 at Yarmouth,Barnstable Co.,Massachusetts, children: 1. John Hall (1661-), 2. Joseph Hall (29 SEP 1663-1737), 3. Bethia Hall (15 NOV 1668-8 MAR 1709), 4. Priscilla Hall (FEB 1671-), 5. Hester Hall (12 APR 1672-BEF 1718), 6. Mary Hall (1673-), 7. Martha Hall (24 MAY 1676-), 8. Nathaniel Hall (15 SEP 1678-).

Sarah Bearse (28 MAR 1646-) m. John Hamblen (26 JUN 1644-AFT 23 JAN 1683) on AUG 1667 at Barnstable,Barnstable Co.,Massachusetts, children: 1. Melatiah Hamblen (1 JUL 1668-AFT 1734), 2. Priscilla Hamblen (30 APR 1670-), 3. Sarah Hamblen (1 JUL 1671-), 4. Martha Hamblen (16 FEB 1673-AFT 1734), 5. Experience Hamblen (16 APR 1674-26 JUL 1766), 6. Hannah Hamblen (16 FEB 1676-BEF 6 JUL 1737), 7. Esther Hamblen (17 MAR 1677-), 8. Thankful Hamblen (16 OCT 1679-), 9. John Hamblen (10 MAR 1681-), 10. Ebenezer Hamblen (12 MAY 1683-), 11. Abigail Hamblen (24 APR 1685-), 12. Benjamin Hamblen (11 FEB 1686-).

Abigail Bearse (18 DEC 1647-) m. Allen Nichols on 12 APR 1670

Hannah Bearse (16 NOV 1649-)

Joseph Bearse (25 JAN 1652-27 JAN 1727/1728) m. Martha Taylor (-AFT 13 SEP 1695) on 3 DEC 1676 at Barnstable,Barnstable Co.,Massachusetts, children: 1. Mary Bearse (16 AUG 1677-19 JAN 1760), 2. Joseph Bearse (21 FEB 1679-), 3. Benjamin Bearse (21 JUN 1682-15 MAY 1748), 4. Priscilla Bearse (31 DEC 1683-), 5. Ebenezer Bearse (20 JAN 1686-), 6. John Bearse (8 MAY 1687-), 7. Josiah Bearse (10 MAR 1690-31 AUG 1753), 8. James Bearse (3 OCT 1692-).

Hester Bearse (2 OCT 1653-)

Lydia Bearse (ABT 30 SEP 1655-)

Rebecca Bearse (26 SEP 1657-) m. William Hunter (ABT 1642-) on 17 FEB 1670 at Barnstable,Barnstable Co.,Massachusetts

James Bearse (ABT 31 JUL 1660-7 OCT 1728) m. Experience Howland on 1684 at Barnstable,Barnstable Co.,Massachusetts

Notes:

An article in the Utah Genealogy Magazine, July 1935, states that a diary of Zeriah Newcomb , in the collection of the Library of Congress, shows that Austin Bearse married Mary Hyanno, daughter of John Hyanno, and granddaughter of the Sachem of Wampanoag. [Info from Jeanne Theberge Carrier Aug 1997].

 

This Mary Hyanno theory has been challenged and is considered to be without evidence (although not completely disproven). One site suggests Austin Bearse's wife was Martha Wilder, b. c1620 in Shiplake, Oxfordshire England.

 

http://chrisman.org/pedigree/out60.htm

Individual Note 8

Mary Hyanno, known as "Litttle Dove", is said to have married early Plymouth settler Augustine Bearse. Mary was the daughter of John Hyanno, who was born in 1595 at the Mattachee Village at what is now Barnstable, Massachusetts, and Mary No-Pee, who was born at Gays Head on Martha's Vineyard and was the daughter of No-Took-Seet. John was the son of Iyannough, the sachem of the Mattachee village of Wampanoags of Cape Cod, and Princess Canonicus. He died after 1680 on Cape Cod. Princess Canonicus was the daughter of Canochet (Chief) Canonicus and Posh-Pw. Canochet Canonicus was the son of Wessonsuoum and Keshechoo. Wessonsuoum was the son of Chief Tashtassuck, who was born before 1520.

 

Mary Hyanno is said to have been of fair complexion and red hair. The Wampanoags were often referred to as "white Indians" due to their light skin and are thought by some to have descended from Viking explorers. This assertion is very controversial. There indeed was an Iyannough, and Hyannis, Massachusetts is named for him.

 

The Bearse/Hyanno marriage entered the written record via a document filed in the 1930's by Franklin Ele-watum Bearse, a Scaticoke and Eastern Indian, in an attempt to obtain benefits as an Indian from the State of Connecticut. Mr. Bearse's claims are analyzed in a article by Jacobus entitled "Austin Bearse and His Alleged Indian Connectionis" in THE AMERICAN GENEALOGIST published about 1936. Mr. Jacobus does not accept the Franklin Bearse story and endeavored to disprove it. However, family traditions of the Hyanno marriage exist to this day in other branches of the Bearse family. These traditions do not appear to have been derived from Franklin Bearse.

 

The Cornwall family also claims Mary Hyanno as an ancestor.

 

http://www.murrah.com/gen/hyanno.htm

Sources

1Curfman, Robert Joseph, "The Paddock Genealogy : Descendants of Robert Paddock of Plymouth Colony, Blacksmith and Constable 1646" (LC: CS71.P122 1977).
2"Find A Grave" (findagrave.com). http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=54510&GRid=28165318&.
3"rootsweb.com". http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=glencoe&id=I14235.
4"Find A Grave" (findagrave.com). http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=28165235.
5"rootsweb.com". http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~rett1950/gbu/gbu.html.