HMS Culloden

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Culloden, 1783
Type: 3rd rate ; Armament 74
Disposal date or year : 1813
BM: 1683 tons
Complement: 594
Notes:

2 May - 1 Jun 1794 Departure of the Channel Fleet from St. Helen's, and the lead up to actions and manoeuvres with the French fleet. 29 May - 1 Jun., what was to be known as the Battle of the Glorious 1st June commences, resulting in the capture of six sail of the line and one sunk. 1 Jun, Saved men from the Vengeur. Review of the part performed by each British ship engaged. 13 Jun, the fleet arrived back in home ports.

3-10 Dec 1794 Mutiny onboard, resulting in 5 men being hanged on 13 Jan 1795.

14 Feb 1795 the Channel fleet departed from Torbay for a brief cruise and to see various convoys safe out of the Channel.

14 Jun 1795 the British fleet, then off Minorca, joined by a squadron from Gibraltar and England, including the Culloden, Captain Thomas Troubridge.

8 Jul 1795, the fleet, at anchor at in San-Fiorenzo bay, once aware that the French fleet was close by, gave chase. It was sighted on the 13th and later the order was given for the general chase, but apart from the loss of a 74 by the French the result was inconclusive and resulted in not a little criticism, the consequence perhaps being Admiral Hotham's resignation on 1 Nov 1795.

6 Aug 1795, Admiral Hotham put to sea on a cruise, sighting the French fleet in Toulon road.

27 Dec 1795 Captain Troubridge's squadron, including the Culloden, when off Cape Matapan, chased the Badine, a part of M. Ganteaume's squadron. The Badine anchored close off the town; and on the next day the Lowestoffe anchored alongside of her. On the 31st of December Commodore Troubridge, with the remainder of his squadron, anchored in the harbour of Milo, and subsequently steered for Smyrna.

10 Dec 1796 At Gibraltar. The Gibraltar, Captain John Pakenham, and the Culloden 74, Captain Thomas Troubridge, were driven from their moorings and narrowly escape destruction, unlike the Courageux, lost on the same night.

21 Dec 1796 the Tagus. The Mediterranean fleet arrived.

Circa 20 Jan 1797 departed from the Tagus with a Portuguese convoy and was subsequently, 6 Feb., joined off Cape St.-Vincent by a squadron detached from the Channel fleet.

12 Feb 1797 Colossus in collision with the Culloden.

14 Feb 1797 Jervis's action with the Spanish off Cape St Vincent.

31 Mar 1797 departed from Lisbon to blockade Cadiz.

29 May 1797 Attack on Santa-Cruz, Teneriffe.

24 May 1798 departed from off Cadiz with a squadron of 10 ships of the line to join Nelson's squadron in the Mediterranean, arriving on 7 Jun.

7 Jun 1798 the search for the French fleet.

1 Aug 1798 the preparation for the Battle of the Nile.

1 Aug 1798 Battle of the Nile.

1-3 Aug 1798 Mutine assisted the Culloden off the reef on which she had grounded when entering Aboukir Bay prior to the Battle of the Nile.

19 Aug 1798 R.-adm Nelson, in the Vanguard, accompanied by the Culloden and Alexander, leave Aboukir Bay for Naples.

Sep-Oct 1798 Nelson detached Alexander, Culloden and Colossus from Naples to join the combined squadron of Portuguese and British ships under the Marquess de Niza in the blockade of Malta which commenced circa 12 Oct.

28 Nov 1798 Vanguard, Culloden, Minotaur, Terpsichore, and hired cutter Flora capture the Genoese corvettes Le Tigre and L'Eguaglianza, near Leghorn. Prize money paid 17 Jun 1802.

2 Feb 1799 arrived off Alexandria.

7 Mar 1799 departed to join Nelson off Palermo.

18 Mar 1799 arrived at Palermo from off Alexandria. 31st detached to blockade the port of Naples.

17 May 1799 joined Nelson at Palermo.

13 Jun-mid Aug 1799 departed from off Palermo for a cruise, arriving Naples 24th, where crews were involved in operations ashore.

29 Jul 1800 Plymouth, arrived from the Straits.

11 Sep 1800 Plymouth, in dock having leaks stopped.

21 Oct 1800 Plymouth, still in dock refitting.

27 May 1801 remains in dock.

2 Feb 1802 the Aquilon, 84 ; Culloden, 74 ; and Lapwing, 38, are in dock at Plymouth refitting. The Culloden is completely stripped of her planks, and her bends and knees are strong and perfect. The Aquilon is also stripped, and her lower timbers appear also to be sound.

14 Mar 1802 remains in dock in Hamoaze.

1 Apr 1802 in Hamoaze the Conqueror, 74, now in dock, is almost ready to go out, and the Tenant, 84, and Culloden, 74, are completely stripped to have their timbers thoroughly examined.

4 Oct 1802 went out of dock at Plymouth after being thoroughly repaired.

12 Nov 1802 commissioned by Captain Lane.

16 Nov 1802 a party of marines embarked on board the Culloden, 74, Captain C.N. Lane, fitting for sea in Hamoaze.

22 Nov 1802 J. Liddell, Deputy Judge-Advocate at Portsmouth, is also appointed from the Culloden, 74, to be Purser of the Conqueror, 74, now in ordinary in the Tamar.

25 Nov 1802 Major Coles, and 100 of the Royal Plymouth Division of Marines, embarked on board the Culloden, 74, Captain C.H. Lane, now fitting for the East India Station, it is said to receive the broad pendant of Commodore Sir Thomas Trowbridge, Bart for that station ; she gets seamen very fast, as the men that enter in time of Peace, prefer a foreign to an home station.

22 Dec 1802 was fitting for sea in Hamoaze, alongside the Yarmouth hulk, and was expected to be ready for sea in about a fortnight.

12 Jan 1803 R.-Adm Dacres shifted his flag in the Hamoaze, from the Courageux to the Culloden.

3 Feb 1803 the Escort, Rambler and Gannet arrived Plymouth from Ireland with volunteer seamen for the Courageux, and Culloden fitting for sea in Hamoaze.

17 Mar 1803 Adm Keith arrived Plymouth this morning and hoisted his flag on board the Culloden, R.-Adm Dacres having transferred his flag to the Spitfire, Capt Keen, in Hamoaze.

23 Mar 1803 Capt Otway is understood to have been appointed to the Culloden, vice Capt Lane, who is appointed to the receiving ship Prince Frederick.

26 Mar 1803 this forenoon, bent her final sail, the main-sail, preparatory to going down into Cawsand Bay.

28 Mar 1803 at noon, went down the harbour and came to in Hamoaze.

30 Mar 1803 a tender with pressed men arrived at the back of the island of St Nicholas, Plymouth, and lay to, whilst several boats from the Culloden and the Courageux came down to take the men back to their ships.

11 Apr 1803 are reported to be under orders to depart Cawsand Bay for Torbay, the Culloden, R-Adm Campbell, Capt Otway ; Courageux, Capt Hardy ; and Albion, Capt Ferrier, and will sail this evening, wind permitting.

15 Apr 1803 departed Cawsand Bay for Torbay, the Culloden, Venerable, Courageux, and Thunderer.

29 Apr 1803 as a result of the expected forthcoming collapse of the Treaty of Amiens, aka, Peace of Amiens, the following squadron was arriving from Cawsand Bay and slowly forming up off Brixham Quay, at Torbay, the Culloden, Neptune, Ardent, Albion, Courageux, Venerable, and Thunderer.

16 May 1803 Adm Cornwallis sailed on Monday from Torbay, with a squadron consisting of the following ships : Dreadnought, 98, Hon Adm Cornwallis, First Capt Murray, Second Capt Brace ; Neptune, 98, Capt Drury ; Albion, 74, Capt Ferrier ; Minotaur, 74, Capt Louis ; Ardent, 64, Capt Winthorp ; Culloden, 74, R.-Adm Campbell, Capt Lane ; Venerable, 74, Capt Searle ; Sceptre, 74, Capt Dickson ; Thunderer, 74, Capt Bedford ; and Russel, 74, Capt Williams. The Tonant, Malta, Spartiate, Plantagenet, Mars and Conqueror, lying in Cawsand Bay are nearly ready for sea, and want but few men to complete their complement.

18 Jun 1803 the Dryad arrived Spithead from the fleet, the Culloden, Russell, and Doris forming the inshore squadron at present, whilst the Tonnant, Spartiate, and Mars were cruising off Rochefort.

9 Jul 1803 arrived Plymouth, from the Channel Fleet ; left them all well last Tuesday, cruising off the Ushant, and brings with her a small schooner of 8 guns, a prize.

Circa 18 Jul 1803 R.-Adm Campbell struck his flag on board the Culloden and shifted it to the Canopus.

24 Jul - 2 Sep 1803 chase of and escape of the Duguay-Trouin, 74 and the 40-gun frigate Guerriθre.

5 Oct 1803 arrived Cawsand Bay from the Channel Fleet to refit, and it is reported that she will sail for off Ferrol and Corunna when ready.

18 Oct 1803 departed Plymouth the Culloden, Capt Damer, to join the Squadron off Ferrol and Corruna, and not the Channel Squadron as previously stated.

Circa 13 Feb 1804 Capt G Reynolds apptd to the Culloden.

17 Jun 1804 the Culloden, Capt Cole, arrived Spithead, from Plymouth.

Circa 30 Jun 1804 the Baring, United Kingdom, Lord Hawkesbury, Duke of Montrose, Airly Castle, Worcester, Monarch and Sovereign, arrived at the Motherbank, to proceed to India under convoy of the Culloden, Capt Cole. R.-Adm. Pellew is expected Monday to hoist his flag. The Alexander is to arrive from the Downs. The 17th Regt at Cowes, and a number of troops from the depot in the Isle of Wight are to embark on board the Indiamen.

4 Jul 1804 Sir E Pellew arrived Portsmouth, and hoisted his flag on board the Culloden.

7 Jul 1804 the Culloden and East India ships dropped down to St Helen's, from whence they are due to depart tomorrow, wind and weather permitted. Sir J Craddock, and Major-Gen Smith are embarked for Madras.

10 Jul 1804 departed the Culloden, R.-Adm Sir E Pellew, Capt C Cole, with the Baring, Sovereign, Alexander, Monarch, Mangles, Worcester, Airly Castle, Duke of Montrose and Lord Hawkesbury, outward-bound East Indiamen, under convoy. The Mangles returned, having lost the convoy in a fog ; and is since gone to the Motherbank.

May 1805 East Indies

27 Nov 1806 a part of a squadron under R.-Adm. Pellew which arrived off the road of Batavia and destroyed the Dutch frigate Phoenix and other vessels lying there.

23 Sep 1806 captured the French privateer Emilien on the East Indies station.

20 Nov-11 Dec 1807 A part of a squadron under R.-adm Sir E. Pellew which entered Gressie, Dutch EI, to destroy vessels and stores.

10 Jun 1808 captured the French privateer Union on the East Indies station.

8 - 17 March 1809 extract from the log during convoy duties in the Indian Ocean, when overtaken by a hurricane.


Extract from the log of HMS Culloden, Captain P. B. Pellew.

Hour K. F. Courses Winds Remarks
Wed 8 Mar 1809
A.M.          
1     WSW SE A.M. Moderate breezes.
2          
3          
4         Fresh winds, with rain.
5          
6       E by S Ditto weather.
7          
8          
9          
10          
11          

12

      ESE Lat 18° 19’, long 79° 30’ E
P.M.          
1     WSW SE P.M. Strong winds and squally.
Took in the third reef of the topsails.
Sent the royal-masts on deck.
Close-reefed the topsails ; handed the main-topsail.
2        
3        
4        
5        
6        
7        
8        
9        
10        
11        
12         Strong winds, with a great sea from the SE.
Thurs 9 Mar 1809
A.M.          
1 7 2 WSW SE A.M. Strong winds and squally.
2 7 0      
3 7 6      
4 7 6     Ditto weather.
5 7 2      
6 7 0     Out fourth reefs ; set the mizen-topsail.
7 6 4      
8 7 4      
9 8 0     Long. (by sun and moon) 76° 15’ E.
10 8 0     Strong winds.
11 8 4      
12 8 2     Lat. 19° 22’ S, long 76° 38’
Roderique, S 84° W, 130 leagues.
P.M.          
1 7 4 WSW SE P.M. Strong winds ; loosed the mainsail.
2 7 2      
3 7 2      
4 7 4      
5 7 4      
6 7 6     Ditto weather ; convoy in company.
7 7 0      
8 7 0     Furled the mainsail.
9 7 0      
10 7 4     Strong winds, with a great sea from the SE.
11 7 4      
12 7 2   SE by S  
Fri 10 Mar 1809
A.M.          
1 7 2 WSW SE by SSE    A.M. Strong winds.
2 7 4      
3 7 6      
4 7 4     Ditto weather ; convoy in company, except the Northumberland.
5 8 0     Up foresail.
6 7 6      
7 7 2     Saw the Northumberland astern.
8 6 4     Long. (by lunar obs.) at A.M. 73° 53’ 30".
9 7 0      
10 7 2      
11 7 0      
12 7 2     Lat 20° 17’ ", long 73° 58’ E.
Thermometer 77°.
Cape St. Mary, S 79° W, 533 leagues.
P.M.          
1 7 0 WSW SE by S P.M. Strong winds.
Set the fore and main-topsail-staysails.
2 6 6    
3 7 4      
4 8 0      
5 7 6      
6 6 4      
7 6 6      
8 7 0     Strong breezes, with a great swell from the SE.
9 6 6      
10 6 6      
11 6 6      
12 7 0     Ditto weather ; twelve ships in sight.
Sat 11 Mar 1809
A.M.          
1 6 0 WSW SE by S A.M. Strong winds.
2 6 0      
3 6 2     Split the foresail ; set the mainsail and main-topmast-staysail.
4 7 2   SSE
5 6 6      
6 7 0      
7 7 2     Unbent the foresail ; fore and mizen-topsails, and bent new ones
8 7 0 W by S S by E
9 7 4      
10 8 2      
11 8 4      
12 8 4     Lat 20° 58’ S, long 71° 10’ E.
Cape St Mary S 90° W, 483 leagues.
P.M.          
1 6 2 W by S SSE  
2 6 4      
3 6 4     P.M. Strong winds and squally.
4 6 6   SE by S Ditto weather ; convoy in company.
5 7 0      
6 6 4   SSE  
7 6 4      
8 7 2      
9 7 2     Strong breezes, with rain.
10 7 6      
11 7 6      
12 7 4      
Sun 12 Mar 1809
A.M.          
1 7 0 W by S S by E A.M. Strong winds ; close reefed the fore-topsail.
2 7 2    
3 7 4      
4 7 6     Ditto weather ; ten sail in sight.
5 8 0      
6 8 2     Strong winds and squally, with a great sea ; all the fleet in sight.
7 7 6    
8 6 6   Se by S  
9 7 4      
10 7 4     Fresh winds and squally.
11 7 4      
12 7 0     Lat 20° 41’ S, long 68° 14’ E.
Cape St Mary S 80° W, 430 leagues.
Thermometer 78°.
P.M.          
1 7 0 W by S SE P.M. Strong winds and squally.
2 6 0      
3 6 2      
4 6 4      
5 6 4     Ditto weather ; convoy in company.
6 6 2      
7 6 4      
8 6 4      
9 6 4     Squally, with rain ; seven ships in sight.
10 7 0      
11 7 0      
12 7 4      
Mon 13 Mar 1809
A.M.          
1 7 2 W by S SE A.M. Strong winds and squally.
2 7 2      
3 7 4      
4 7 4     Ditto weather ; handed the fore-topsail at daylight ; set it again.
5 6 4    
6 6 4      
7 6 6      
8 7 2 W   Strong breezes and cloudy ; convoy in company.
9 8 0 W by S SSE  
10 7 0      
11 6 0      
12 8 0     Cape St Mary S 80° W, 370 leagues.
Lat 22° 19’ S, long 65° 23’ E.
Thermometer 77½°.
P.M.          
1 8 0 W by S SE  
2 7 6      
3 8 0      
4 8 0     P.M. Strong winds and squally.
5 7 4      
6 7 4     Ditto weather, with rain.
7 8 0      
8 8 2      
9 7 2     Fresh gales and squally.
10 7 4      
11 7 4   SSE Five ships in sight.
12 7 4      
           
           
           
A.M.         Tuesday, March 14, 1809.
1 7 0 W by S SSE A.M. Strong winds and squally, with hard rain ; at daylight, squally, with hard rain; down top-gallant-yards; got the flying jib-boom in, and handed the fore-sail.
2 7 0    
3 7 6    
4 7 4    
5 7 2    
6 6 6      
7 7 0      
8 7 0      
9 6 6     Strong gales and equally; got the jib-boom in; handed the fore-topsail ; bent main-staysail and trysail.
10 7 4   SE
11 7 4    
12 7 2     Strong gales; six ships in sight.
Lat. 22° 54’ S, long. 62° 14' E.
SW point Isle of France, N 65° W, 118 leagues.
         
         
P.M.          
1 7 4 W by S SE P.M. Hard gales and thick weather, with a great sea.
2 7 0    
3 7 0     Took in the main-topsail; set the main-staysail ; it blew to pieces.
4 6 6    
5 6 4      
6 6 6      
7 7 2     Hard gales, with a heavy sea ; none of the ships in sight.
8 7 4    
9 7        
10 8 4      
11 7 6      
12 8 2     Very hard gales and a heavy sea.
Wed 16 Mar 1809.
A.M.          
1 9 2 W by S S E by E A.M. Heavy gales.
2 9 0     The fore-staysail blew to pieces; a sea struck the larboard-quarter boat, broke the davit, and stove the boat; the starboard quarter gallery was washed away.
3 9 0    
4 9 0    
5 8 0    
6 8 0      
7 8 0      
8 9 0 WSW ESE Attempting to cut away the mizen-topmast it went, and carried away the head of the mizenmast, the gaff, and part of the top; lost the whole of the rigging &c. ; bent the fore-topmast-staysail for a main-staysail.
9 9 0
10 7 4
11 7 0
12 8 4     SE point Isle of Bourbon, N 67° W, 170 miles.
Lat. 22° 34' S, long. 58° 38’ E.
P.M.          
1 8 0 SW b W ESE P.M. got the fore and main-top-gallant-masts on deck; double breeched and cleeted the lower-deck guns; got the main-runners up.
2 8 0    
3 8 0     Took in the slack of the lee main rigging.
Hard gales, with tremendous heavy gusts.
4 8 0 SW ½ W E The gale appeared to break.
5 7 6      
6 7 0     More moderate, with less sea ; set the reefed foresail.
7 7 0    
8 7 6 SW    
9 8 0 SW E  
10 8 6      
11 8 0      
12 8 0     Strong gales, with rain at time.
Found 160 yards of the spanker saved, the rest was lost with the mizenmast head, and spanker-boom; found several knees broke, the transom worked very much, and the nails of the lower deck planks drawn three or four inches ; the Upper stroke broken in the wake of the mainmast, &c.
Thurs 16 Mar 1809
A.M.         A.M. Strong gales and cloudy.
1 7 0 SW  
2 7 0    
3 7 6    
4 7 4    
5 7 2    
6 6 6    
7 7 0     At 7, up foresail; brought-to for the convoy : employed mending the service of the rigging, putting the ship to rights, &c.
Lat. 26° 6' S, long. 66' 371 E.
Cape St. Mary, N 87° W, 213 leagues.
8
9
10
11
12
    up SSE
off S b W
E by N
P.M.          
1 8 4 NW ENE P.M. Strong winds and hazy.
2 8 6      
3 9 4      
4 10 0     Set up the larboard main-rigging.
5 9 0   NE by E  
6 9 0      
7 10 4 W   Hard gales, with rain and a heavy sea.
8 10 4     Larboard gallery washed away.
9 9 0     A very hard squall; clewed up the main-top-sail ; it blew away; hauled up the foresail and handed it; the ship strained and laboured much, one chain and one hand pump kept her free.
10 9 0 W by N  
11 7 4    
12 7 0    
         
Fri 17 March 1809
A.M.          
1 4 0   NNE A.M. Very hard gales, with heavy sea.
2 4 0   N  
3 3 6     Set the trysail.
4 3 4   NNW The ship strained, and leaked in every part of the upper works and deck; at daylight, found the fore and main belly-stays, the inner bob-stays, and laniards of the two foremost fore-shrouds carried away.
5
6
    up SW ½ W  
7
8
9
    off N W
10
11
12
    SSW W N W Cape St. Mary, N 82° W, 194 leagues.
Lat. 26° 53’ S, long. 64° 42’ E.
P.M.          
1
2
3
4
    up SSW
off S by E
W by S P.M. Fresh gales and cloudy, with a great swell from the S W.
5 1 6 NW b N    
6 2 0 ½ N
NW b N
   
7 2 0      
8 2 0      
9 2 0      
10 2 4 NW    
11 2 6      
12 4 0 NW b W S W Wind veering to the southward; fine weather.